The Alternative Energy Challenge – UT Austin Students Innovate with Simulation

Since 2010, the Alternative Energy Challenge (AEC), a competition organized by the University of Texas at Austin, has allowed students to gain valuable hands-on experience building prototypes, and to develop both critical problem solving and public speaking skills. AEC 2018 is expected to be the biggest yet, with a large number of teams of 2-5 undergraduate students expected to build and present their prototypes.

Each team is tasked with designing and building an original prototype that mitigates or eliminates one or more risks and/or problems that can arise before, during, or after any kind of natural disaster. The device should fulfill the following requirements as much as possible:​

  • The waste product should be minimal. In other words, the materials that make up the device should be reusable wherever possible (recyclable, compostable, etc.).
  • The device should operate on a clean energy source. The device should not be powered by an energy source which contributes to the greenhouse effect. ​

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Embry-Riddle Students Crowdfunding to Shatter Land Speed Record

Today it’s not uncommon to see electrics cars around everywhere. In fact, I imagine many of you readers might even have one. I wonder how many of you dared to push your car to 250 miles per hour (402.3 kilometers per hour). That’s exactly what our team, Eagle Works Advanced Vehicle Lab from Embry-Riddle in Prescott, Arizona plans to do.

Our goal is to shatter the record in the E-2 Class for electric land speed vehicles. Continue reading

Simulating Eddy Current Testing of Honeycomb Aircraft Panels with ANSYS Discovery AIM

Wing of an airplane flying above the sunrise cloudy sky at morningWithin the aerospace and transportation industries, it is always desirable to minimize weight without sacrificing strength. One such method of achieving this in aircraft wings and other aircraft structures is to use honeycomb paneling. Such structures are susceptible to damage from things like hail or tool drop, however, and the damage may not be noticeable from the surface. The face sheet may rebound, leaving crushing to the honeycomb core hidden beneath the surface.

Accurately determining impact damage in aluminum honeycomb aircraft panels is critical to evaluating the remaining lifetime of these structures. The hidden crushed core decreases the residual strength of the panels, so it’s important to detect it. Based on using a dial depth gauge for measuring dents, determining the impact damage in honeycomb aircraft panels can be laborious and subjective. If the impact damage also includes crushing of the internal honeycomb core, a manual tap tester is often used, which is both manual and subjective. Continue reading

Thermo-Mechanical Analysis Methods for Printed Circuit Boards: Part 2

In part one of this series, we discussed modeling approaches for the complex geometry found in printed circuit boards. Now, we’ll move on to discussing methods for characterizing the thermal properties of integrated circuit (IC) packages.

Analysis of IC packages is critical at many levels of the design process, including package level thermal design, board level modeling including heat sink designs and package viability, as well as system level flow and thermal characterization. Much like a PCB, IC packages are geometrically complex, with disparate length scales that are challenging to explicitly capture in an analysis.

Typical IC Packages  Continue reading

Meet the ANSYS Embedded Systems and Software Team at Embedded World

Embedded World 2018 is just around the corner and we’re excited. Embedded World brings together over 30,000 embedded systems and software professionals focusing on new technologies in embedded systems and software, and I’m pleased to let you know that ANSYS will be there again this year in booth 4-631, located in Hall 4.

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ANSYS 19 Delivers Accurate CFD for Very Large and Very Small Details

ANSYS Fluent can simulate really big models (1)Engineering problems can be quite straight forward when confined to a single size scale. For example, designing an elephant-proof fence is simply an exercise welding together enough big steel bars. But what if it also has to confine mice? By mixing the very large and very small size scales, the mouse introduces a whole new set of problems that will greatly complicate the design and construction of the fence. Tiny gaps irrelevant to the elephant can be escape ways for the mouse!

ANSYS Fluent can simulate really small models (1) Continue reading

Efficiency Maps for Electric Motors Made Easy

Simulating electric motors saves time, minimizes the number of needed prototypes and enables innovation as it is possible to virtually test a wide range of possible designs. ANSYS can simulate electric motors in many ways: evaluate magnetic performance, predict thermal behavior, limit noise vibration effects, understand how to the machine interacts with the power electronics.

With the release of ANSYS 19, we are excited to introduce a new capability within ANSYS Maxwell specifically dedicated for electrical machines that are used in a wide range of operating conditions (speed, torque, current, etc). Think about an electric or hybrid car: the driver needs power for a variety of purposes (high torque when accelerating, high speed when cruising). Machine designers face big challenges to design and control such motors: how to optimize the performance when the motor is going to be used in a variety of conditions?

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Accelerating Rapid Product Development with ANSYS Discovery

Last September, we launched the preview of ANSYS Discovery Live — a new technology that can bring intuitive and real-time simulation insight to all engineering decisions.

 “… one of the biggest breakthroughs in design and engineering technology in the last ten years” – Develop3D

Today, we go from technology preview to the commercial availability as we introduce the ANSYS Discovery family of products. This is a big step towards the vision of simulation for every engineer and every product — to make it as easy to simulate a product’s physical performance, as it is to use Google Search. Continue reading

Improve Thermal Reliability with ANSYS Icepak

Electronics is at the heart of many exciting products like smartphones, tablets, and TVs, and it plays a key role in various industries from semiconductor, automotive, agriculture, aerospace, entertainment to healthcare. Modern electronic devices are faster, smaller, and denser than ever before. Since we pack millions of transistors within a small area, these devices tend to generate a lot of heat. Heat-induced mechanical effects, such as delamination, and breakage of solder joints connecting the chips to their printed circuit boards (PCBs), can cause system-wide reliability problems. It’s critical to simulate the electro-thermal and structural properties of electronic designs before you build the hardware. Simulation tools from ANSYS can solve these challenges and improve the reliability and performance of electronic products. Continue reading

Zyz Team is Simulating a Racing Sailboat with ANSYS

As an academic organization within the University of Palermo (Italy), our Zyz Sailing Team brings together students and professors with a shared passion for the design and manufacture of a racing sailboat. Our members have particular skill sets. Some are experienced with engineering design elements, such as CAD, the finite element method (FEM) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), while others are expert craftsmen.

We began designing and building small sailing boats in 2008. Our latest challenge was the creation of Ercte, a 16-foot foiling catamaran constructed of marine plywood and carbon fiber reinforced plastic.

ZYZ Sailing boat image of Ercte catamaran: initial designErcte catamaran: initial design

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