Ocean Waves – A Nightmare for Offshore Structures

You may have heard about the grounding of an Alaskan oil rig in January, 2013. The 28,000-tonne rig was pushed toward the shore by waves up to 35 feet and winds up to 62 mph, dragging its main towing vessel and a tug behind it. There have been several such oil rig incidents over the past few decades. The below image shows the failure of an another oil rig platform due to extreme wave forces. A huge wave hitting the offshore platform leads to high wave impact loads that can eventually result in significant platform damage and collapse. These incidents can cause fatalities and damages that can cost hundreds of millions of dollars. Continue reading

Simplifying Fatigue Analysis

iStock_failed wind turbineOne way to measure the effectiveness of engineering software is the amount of time it takes to reach a sufficiently accurate solution. Simulations by definition are an approximation of reality. Those who solve complex problems— using structural, fatigue analysis, CFD, electronics —  know that we have to pay for more accuracy with additional work and/or longer computing time.

Best in class software enables the user to capture the majority of work done, so it need not be repeated again and again, after all repetition is best done by computers. In this blog we will focus on fatigue simulation, which at first glance can be daunting to new users. There are several different solution methods that can be used with numerous additional correction factors available in most durability programs. There is a “best” combination of methods for most types of problems, which can be guided by experience and expertise. The ability to encapsulate the most appropriate method in a “fatigue workflow” as implemented in ANSYS nCode DesignLife is a major labor saving feature. Continue reading

Prof Bert Blocken Kicks off CFD MOOC This Month

“Sports and Building Aerodynamics”, MOOC  with Professor Bert Blocken

“Sports and Building Aerodynamics”, MOOC with Professor Bert Blocken

A fun and interesting online course to learn fluid mechanics and CFD as well as how they are applied to sports and environments around buildings is coming up soon. In his MOOC (Massively Open Online Course) entitled “Sports and Building Aerodynamics,” Professor Bert Blocken of Eindhoven  University of Technology (TU/e) plans to introduce wind tunnel testing and the use of ANSYS CFD. The course begins April 28, 2014.

You might have wondered about how aerodynamic shaping of cars, bikes, etc. affects the win/loss or margin of victory in a race. This course will give you insights about how the physics shapes these objects and influences performance. Continue reading

This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology Articles

Hello all! My top engineering technology picks of the week include a 3-D printed drone created with ANSYS software and a massive game of Jenga. Have a great weekend!

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The Pittsburgh Science and Engineering Fair and ANSYS

Every year I look forward to spring for two main reasons: Getting over the winter blues is an obvious one; attending the Pittsburgh Regional Science and Engineering Fair (PRSEF) is the other. This year was no exception. PRSEF celebrated its 75th anniversary, and more than 1,000 students from middle, intermediate and high schools in and around the Pittsburgh area participated and competed for best-project awards, sponsorships and scholarships. A few entries from the senior category go on to compete in the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Continue reading

Reshaping the Future of CFD Using Mesh Morphing

A cool title, isn’t it? Hello ANSYS blog readers! This is my first time in this blog as a guest blogger. You will notice a brief resume of mine together my photo as the author of this post, but let me introduce myself so that you can understand why I am here writing about mesh morphing to the ANSYS audience.

I am a Professor at University of Rome, with good experience in fluid structure interaction (FSI) and Fluent customization using UDF programming. Five years ago, driven by a Formula 1 Top Team, I developed a powerful mesh morphing tool crafted by tough specifications. Managing any kind of mesh, precise, fast and parallel! Nothing at that time was able to do this kind of job. We tried to go with (RBFs) Radial Basis Functions mesh morphing, one of the most promising techniques. And we made it. Continue reading

This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology News Articles

Our picks for interesting engineering technology news articles this week include lots of cool videos like a stick-on circuit that could power mobile devices from your fingertips and Disney’s Pixelbots and the software that controls it. And with opening day of baseball season behind us in the States, I felt it was only appropriate to feature an interesting piece about teaching kids the Science of Baseball.

Enjoy!

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Designing Cool, Wearable Electronics with ANSYS and Synapse

nike fuel band Hardly a day goes by when we don’t hear about the upcoming revolution in wearable devices or the Internet of Things (IoT). The $3.2B acquisition of Nest® by Google clearly got noticed by all of us. But, the Nest thermostat is just one example of connected devices that are poised to change our lives over the coming years. The Nike FuelBand® and Fitbit® have already been helping us shape up for some time. Continue reading