Internet of Things is Going to Rain Money!

Raining money on a businessman…or so one of my friends, Professor Mark Bachman of UC Irvine said.  “It’s up to you to know where to place the buckets” he continued.  He made this clever comment at a recent presentation at the University of California Irvine’s Calit2 “Igniting Technology” event on the Internet of Things (IoT) November 13th.

There were presenters delivering corporate insights from Broadcom, Cisco, Frost Data Capital, and several others. The buckets comment was quoted often during the evening to a crowd that numbered well over 100. The other oft-quoted number that evening was $19 trillion in opportunity by 2020. So where are you going to place your bucket? Continue reading

Designing Superior Turbomachinery Products

fan blades turbomachineryRotating machinery (or turbomachinery) is an application area that spans many industry segments. Each of these significantly influences the performance and efficiency of the entire system. Rotating machinery also covers a range of different scales from very large hydraulic turbines (10m diameter runner), steam and gas turbines to small automotive turbochargers that can fit roughly in the palm of our hand. Improving the performance of rotating machinery has long been realized as a crucial factor in the success of the system as a whole. Continue reading

Supercomputing Milestones via Partnerships

In a previous blog, I was expressing our privilege of having a strong HPC technology partnership with NVIDIA. Earlier this week, we announced a supercomputing milestone of scaling to 36,000 cores with fluid dynamics simulations being achieved thanks to a strategic partnership with the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Now, you may wonder what the relevance of this achievement is for you when you don’t have access to a supercomputer. Continue reading

Taking Material Modelling to the Next Level – Implementing a user-defined constitutive equation using USERMAT

From a structural reliability point of view, it is very important to understand and accurately characterize the material behavior when designing or analyzing an engineering application.

In this respect, ANSYS Mechanical software provides a vast library of material models that can help users simulate various kinds of behaviors such as elasticity, plasticity, creep and hyperelasticity, just to name a few.

Although these models can be used to investigate the mechanical response of a large number of different materials such as metals, rubbers, biological tissues and special alloys, users may wish to incorporate their own material laws into ANSYS. Continue reading

ANSYS Webinars This Week – Nov 17th

ANSYS Webinar Learning EventsHow’s your Monday going? Mine is just GREAT! I’m watching the rain turn to snow from the window near my desk. I was also looking at the fabulous list of ANSYS webinars on the event calendar for the week of November 17 – 21 and just knew you’d be able to find something of interest to you.

We still have a healthy line up of topic for the remainder of the year, so if you want to do a little more advanced planning, visit our Events Calendar, sort by the type of event you’re looking for and time frame and get registered today! Continue reading

This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology Articles

Hello all! My top engineering technology picks of the week include a flying aircraft carrier, self-assembling furniture and a baseball-playing robot. Have a great weekend!

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Cars and Electronics in Tokyo: 2014 Automotive Simulation World Congress

This is the third year that ANSYS hosted the Automotive Simulation World Congress (ASWC), an international conference focused on engineering simulation in the ground transportation industry. The ASWC is an annual conference that rotates between the three major regions of the world. In previous blogs, I wrote about the 2012 and 2013 ASWC’s held in Detroit and Frankfurt respectively. This year the conference was held in Tokyo on October 9 and 10. Continue reading

Update on Tablet Computing and ANSYS Mechanical

Some time ago, I wrote a couple of posts describing the performance of ANSYS Mechanical APDL on several different tablet computers. Previously, I had studied two separate tablets: one from Fujitsu, which was more of a shrunken laptop with an Intel® Core i5 processor and a second from Dell, which had an Intel® Atom™ processor and was more in line with the look and feel of an iPad. The Fujitsu tablet was clearly faster, but bulkier and pricier. The Dell tablet was lighter, smaller, cheaper, and also less powerful. Continue reading