About Ellen Meeks

Director of Development, Reacting Flows at ANSYS. Ellen has led product development and engineering services for more than 15 years at Reaction Design, including oversight of all major software releases, industry consortia, and several government-funded research projects. Previously, she was a researcher at Sandia National Laboratories in the areas of combustion, materials, and plasma processing; she was one of the principal developers of the CHEMKIN Software.

Including Fuel Effects in 1-D Automotive Powertrain Simulations

Many automotive engine designers are familiar with the 1-D powertrain simulation capabilities of Gamma Technologies’ GT-SUITE. This is a common workhorse for system exploration and optimization of overall engine performance and efficiency. In GT-SUITE a network of component models is used to test the impacts of changes to the turbocharger, manifold configuration, exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) loop, engine cylinder or aftertreatment devices on the overall powertrain performance and controllability. Engine cylinder-to-cylinder and cycle-to-cycle effects can also be studied to assess engine performance metrics.

Mutual ANSYS and Gamma Technologies customers can now evaluate fuel effects within GT-Power simulations, using ANSYS Chemkin-Pro. The interoperability of these two products gives engineers the ability to test the impact of different fuel compositions on engine performance. Continue reading

Using CHEMKIN Simulation Software for Complex Chemical Processes

As a new member of the ANSYS family, via the Reaction Design acquisition, I thought I would take the opportunity to give you a little background on the product line I represent — CHEMKIN.

The software had its beginnings at Sandia National Laboratories, as part of the U.S. Government’s response to the oil crisis of the 1970s. Scientists at Sandia began studying how to make more efficient, cleaner-burning engines, and they created software to simulate the complex molecular-level chemical reactions that take place during fuel combustion. In 1997, Reaction Design licensed that software from Sandia and evolved the technology into a commercial-quality software suite that enables engineers and scientists in microelectronics, combustion and chemical processing industries to develop a comprehensive understanding of chemical processes and kinetics. Continue reading