Mark Hindsbo

About Mark Hindsbo

Vice President and General Manager, Design and Platform Business. I straddle the worlds of technology and business, with a leg solidly planted in each. Prior to joining ANSYS I was the Sr. Vice President of Customer Success at Parallels (now Odin). I spent a little over a decade at Microsoft in roles ranging from General Manager in the Server and Tools Business Group, to Vice President of the Developer Business in the US. I have also worked as a management consultant at The Boston Consulting Group, co-founded an interactive agency, did scientific computing at Novo Nordisk, and nuclear research at CERN. I hold a Master of Science in applied physics & mathematics from the Technical University of Denmark. I am a software developer who grew up with assembly programming on 8/16-bit computers and still code for fun. I am also a lifelong martial artist, holding a 5th degree karate black belt and have competed on the Danish National team as well as in US Nationals. I enjoy speaking on the topics of technology innovation, and business strategy.

Enabling Digital Exploration with ANSYS 18.1

Digital exploration has never been more vital to long-term business success than it is today. The product design space is exploding, driven by increasingly smarter devices, advanced materials, and next-generation manufacturing technologies like 3-D printing and mass customization. At the same time sustainability and cost put pressure on identifying and eliminating unnecessary safety margins, while still ensuring long-term product strength and durability. Design engineers have an unprecedented opportunity to innovate and explore product designs, but also orders of magnitude more complexity to manage. Continue reading

Complex Product Development and the Internet of Things

Internet of things (IoT) Pause and think about the now ubiquitous smartphone for a moment. Our smartphones have revolutionized how we communicate, shop, socialize and work. Now think about the rising complexity in product development from the old rotary phone to today’s smart phone. And phones are just one highly visible example of the smart product revolution. Modern cars, now embedded with millions of lines of code, are quickly on their way to becoming autonomous driving vehicles. Drones are emerging as a transformative technology spanning product delivery to agricultural applications. Even industrial equipment, from tractors to turbines, is becoming smart and connected. All are orders of magnitude more complex than their predecessors.

Welcome to the Internet of Things (IoT)!

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