Margaret Schmitt

About Margaret Schmitt

Margaret Schmitt is an Electronics Business Developent Director at ANSYS, Inc. She has 15 years of experience in IC and electronic systems design and power integrity sign-off. She specializes in the areas of low-power and power/thermal management, and has prior experience in chip design from Sun Microsystems. She has authored/co-authored several papers on power and signal integrity as well as thermal management of electronic systems. Ms. Schmitt holds a Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering from the Technical University of Berlin, Germany.

ANSYS Chip Package System Analysis Ready for the “Next Big Thing” in Mobile Design

Delivering a truly innovative product for the mobile revolution requires optimization at every level of design for power, performance, thermal and structural integrity. The success of today’s electronic products are tied to the success of their entire system, including all components from antenna to board, and from chip to chassis. Designing a smart watch, for example, requires multiple iterations of chip, package, board, antenna, and cooling strategy to arrive at a final optimized product. Continue reading

Designing without Borders – DesignCon 2016

designcon demosProduct development of today’s complex mobile and IoT devices requires the cooperation of independent design teams working at the chip, package, and system level. However, several roadblocks in the electronics design flow make this cooperation very difficult, impacting time, effort, and ultimately the cost required to deliver a successful product to market. Continue reading

Tackling Next Generation CPS Design Challenges

System design and even system integration have taken on a whole new meaning with the latest trends in mobile and wearable computing. Integrating the compute power formerly associated with super-computers into a wrist band puts entirely new challenges on engineers, as they struggle with ensuring  signal and power integrity, as well as controlling the thermal profile. For these next-generation designs, full system analysis in the form of a Chip-Package-System (CPS) co-analysis is not an option anymore — it is an absolute necessity in order to achieve convergence. Continue reading

There’s a Power Battle Going On with the Internet of Things

What do antennas, sensors and integrated circuits all have in common in an IoT-connected device? They are all fighting for the same power supply resources. Indeed, power consumption may be the biggest challenge facing designers of mobile devices for the Internet of Things. As battery sizes shrink to allow for smaller form-factors, battery lifetime becomes critical to meeting cost, performance, and reliability requirements. Continue reading

Enabling EMI Clean Design: Starting with PCB SI & PI Analysis

With the trend to more high-performance and compact systems, EMI compliance has become a critical metric for system success in the automotive, computing, and aerospace industries. Electromagnetic interference issues discovered late in the design cycle can result in the entire system failing to meet regulatory EMI/EMC requirements. Addressing regulatory compliance and product debug can cost not only engineering time to investigate and mitigate issues, but can also threaten product release dates. PCB designers, therefore, need a strategy to address potential issues early in their design, to ensure the system meets compliance. Continue reading

System-level Approach to Robust ESD Design

The battle is on for manufacturers of automotive, medical, industrial and consumer electronics to drive new innovations, deliver exciting products, and ensure safety and reliability of the devices that proliferate our world. Mobile devices that are intended to interact with our world face unique reliability challenges such as electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection, making a robust ESD design a necessity. While we want our mobile phone, tablet and smartwatch to be “connected” and “interactive”, the number of interface ports on these devices make them vulnerable to an ESD event. Interfaces such as network connectors, USB ports, and antennas need careful planning of the location and size of ESD protection structures. Continue reading

Automotive Electronics: Engineering the Ultimate Mobile Device

When we think of “mobile devices”, images of smartphones and tablets come to mind. These devices connect us virtually to events around the world, our family, our friends, and the global marketplace, without ever leaving our homes. And with the advancements in automotive electronics, our driving experiences can also be enhanced, where we are as globally connected to our environment as our smart phones. Such connectivity could augment our driving experience and enhance our security, by providing early warning and accident avoidance capabilities. Imagine cars being aware, not just of the surroundings but also aware of their driver. Imagine a future where your interface to the virtual word is limited not to queries on a touch screen, but rather the entire environment of your car, from the windshield to the seat to the car electronics, which are all engineered to provide a globally connected driving experience unique to you. Continue reading