Sameer Kher

About Sameer Kher

Sameer is a Senior R&D Manager in the Systems business and leads development for the ANSYS Simplorer product line. He joined ANSYS in 2005 and has a BE in Electronics from the University of Pune, and MS in Computer Engineering from the University of Cincinnati and an MBA from Carnegie Mellon University.

The Role of Engineering Simulation in Energy Innovation

engineering simulation energy innovationA few weeks ago, I had the honor and privilege of being one of a few invited attendees at the DOE Mission Innovation Workshop on Grid Modernization. The workshop was hosted by the University of Pittsburgh and held at the Energy Innovation Center. Attendees included leaders from the Department of Energy, Pittsburgh city government officials, community and foundation organizations, and representatives from key local industries — including major utilities, electrical system integrators, electrical system manufacturers and technology companies (like ANSYS).

Pittsburgh, and other similar cities, face significant energy and sustainability challenges over the next few years. These challenges stem primarily from the significant disparity in the goals that have been set — as can be seen in the SmartPGH video — and the current state of the grid and industrial equipment. Continue reading

Reduced Order Modeling in the Context of System Level Simulation

Sameer ROMI recently had the pleasure of representing ANSYS as an invited plenary speaker at the MoRePaS international workshop on Reduced Order Modeling. Model order reduction techniques and the resulting Reduced Order Models are a critical technological advancement that are extremely important in the context of System Level Simulation. Applications of ROMs are vast, ranging from enabling product designers to more accurately simulate the whole product to enabling real-time system analysis. Continue reading

A New Model Exchange Standard – The Functional Mockup Interface

Nearly every industry today deals with issues of an increasingly complex supply chain, representing interconnected relationships between OEMs, and their Tier 1, 2 and 3 suppliers. Customers who perform simulation driven product development are acutely aware of the supply chain issues, because simulation tools used by various companies are usually different and often not interoperable. This is where standards come in — modeling standards like the IEEE VHDL-AMS language provide a clear modifiable description of behavior and all tools that support this language are expected to behave the same way. However, since each tool provides its own implementation of the language compiler (typically converting from the standard modeling language to C++ code), there can be some differences in behavior. Continue reading