About Sudhir Sharma

Sudhir Sharma is the director of high tech industry strategy and marketing at ANSYS. Prior to joining ANSYS, he served in key managerial and technical roles at MathWorks, Texas Instruments, Cirrus Logic, and Compaq Computer Corp. He has designed more than a dozen ASICs and authored 19 U.S. patents for innovative wireless communication, computer networking, video and image processing, and semiconductor memory designs.

Electrification – The Need for Optimizing Power, Performance and Cost

The electrification of our world continues at a rapid pace. Having established a strong footprint across the globe via communication technologies, the high tech industry is now forming alliances with automotive companies to make our cars smarter. You need look no further than the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show, where the automobile industry stole the show with their demonstrations of autonomous vehicles, which are moving ever closer to market. Continue reading

So You Want to Design Medical Devices

Healthcare is often cited as one of the leading applications for the Internet of Things (IoT). Looking around the Web, it is clear that leading high tech companies like Qualcomm, Intel, Cisco, Juniper all have initiatives on healthcare. A notable example is Google, which has already created a prototype contact lens to help measure glucose levels in diabetic patients.

“Better patient outcome” is a goal that all of us can get behind!

But even the most successful high-tech companies are quickly discovering that designing medical devices is different than designing consumer electronics. Designing for the healthcare industry requires extra rigor, insight, and collaboration with healthcare industry experts. Continue reading

Designing a Robust Electronics Product: The Smartphone

smartphone drop testAt last year’s ANSYS Electronics Simulation Expo conference in Japan, my colleague Sandeep Sovani was delivering a keynote when he took out his Samsung smartphone and purposely dropped it on the stage! He was confidently making a point about designing robust electronic products.

The fact that a minor impact didn’t damage his phone’s exterior or degrade the performance of electronics, as best as we can tell, provides testimony that today’s engineers are paying close attention to product reliability and robustness. Continue reading

Mad About Designing a Smartwatch?

Click image to see his 2 watches in action

Jim Cramer is the host of Mad Money. I watch his high-energy, entertaining, investment show regularly. “Booyah!”. Yesterday, I was surprised to see his wrist loaded with two watches. As he didn’t explain, I can only guess as to why he was sporting his Apple Watch along with an analog timepiece. Continue reading

Happy IoT Day !

IotDayToday marks the 5th anniversary of IoT Day. Communities around the world are hosting events that facilitate “conversations around technologies, security, data privacy and the enormous potential that an “Internet of Things” is capable of.” Why does it matter? Because the IoT connectivity boom is transforming how products are designed, delivered, serviced, and consumed. Continue reading

Speeding Innovation For IoT Electronics

In the U.S., CES 2015 kicks off today. You can bet we’ll be watching the trends with a proud eye knowing ANSYS was used in the design of some of the most forward-thinking IoT products.

Hardly a day goes by when I don’t come across an updated industry forecast related to the Internet of Things opportunity. The latest forecast from Radiant Insights predicts that there will be over 100 billion Internet connected devices by 2020. This figure is 4 times higher than previous estimates by Cisco Systems. Continue reading

Designing Products for the IoT Economy

image of Mike North Discovery Channel

Last month I had the pleasure of attending the Designers of Things  conference in San Francisco.  One of my favorite presentations came from Dr. Mike North — host of Discovery Channel shows Prototype This,  Outrageous Acts of Science and In The Making — where he discussed the vast scope of technology’s reach in the modern world. In the video he presented, a sensor-loaded unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) responded to a cell-phone call to pin-point a swimmer in distress and deliver a life jacket to them. What we could only imagine a decade ago, is now fast becoming a reality – intelligent, autonomous, helpful machines.

The connected era, known as the Internet of Things (IoT) is here. Continue reading

Engineering Wearable Technology for the Internet of Things

image of wearable technology internet of thingsThere are already 1.9 billion devices connected to the internet — from home thermostats to fitness bands and refrigerators — with that number slated to reach over 9 billion by 2018. In terms of dollars, according to the latest forecast from IDC, the Internet of Things (IoT) market will grow to more than $7 trillion, up from $2 trillion today with wearable technology leading the way. Continue reading

Designing Cool, Wearable Electronics with ANSYS and Synapse

nike fuel band Hardly a day goes by when we don’t hear about the upcoming revolution in wearable devices or the Internet of Things (IoT). The $3.2B acquisition of Nest® by Google clearly got noticed by all of us. But, the Nest thermostat is just one example of connected devices that are poised to change our lives over the coming years. The Nike FuelBand® and Fitbit® have already been helping us shape up for some time. Continue reading

Powering the Internet of Things

toothbrush2014 is forecast as a banner year for Internet of Things (IoT). The Internet of Things is simply taking electronic devices and connecting them to the Internet — and in many cases connecting them to each other. It was all the rage at the recent Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, where a whole new generation of products were introduced from connected cars to connected toothbrushes. So how might this play out?

Gartner is forecasting that by 2020 there will be 26 billion smart devices and 7.3 billion smartphones. By 2050, analysts are projecting that there will be 50 billion Internet-connected devices, or five gadgets for every man, woman and child.

Meanwhile, Cisco is projecting a 66% CAGR (Compound Annual Growth Rate) in data traffic from 2012 to 2016. We will be transferring 7.4 extabytes of information each month over our mobile networks in 2016. (I looked up exabyte. It is 1018!) Continue reading