Todd McDevitt

About Todd McDevitt

Todd McDevitt is a Marketing Director at ANSYS, Inc. and has more than 15 years experience designing and developing commercial engineering software. His areas of expertise include nonlinear finite element analysis, multibody dynamics, embedded control systems, and model-based system engineering. At ANSYS his efforts are directed towards strategic marketing initiatives and facilitating the company’s R&D planning and decision-making. Mr. McDevitt received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan and holds a Professional Engineering license in the State of Michigan.

Learn About the Many Innovative Features of ANSYS 18

I’m excited and honored to share with you the innovations in the latest release of our suite of simulation solutions, ANSYS 18, on behalf of over a thousand R&D professionals at ANSYS. The driving force for these innovations is the spread of simulation to all areas of engineering practice, a trend we call “pervasive engineering simulation.”

This trend is enabling engineers to explore the design parameter space earlier in the product lifecycle (digital exploration), test thousands of detailed designs rapidly and efficiently (digital prototyping), and monitor and optimize their product’s operation after it has been deployed (using digital twins).

To make pervasive engineering simulation as easy as possible for all engineers, we’ve added a lot of new features to each product family, as you can see below. For more information on ANSYS 18, including demo videos, webcasts, application briefs and technical papers, see our ANSYS 18 web pages. Continue reading

Engineering Simulation – The 10x Multiplier to Top-Line Growth

ansys 17 10X engineering simulationOver the past two decades, I’ve had the good fortune to meet with product development teams in nearly every industry, attend a multitude of engineering conferences and read hundreds of case studies on engineering simulation. Without a doubt, the principle reasons driving businesses to invest in engineering simulation have been to reduce development time and costs while improving product quality. Continue reading

ANSYS Advantage: Spotlighting Process Compression

Around the world, businesses, no matter what the industry, are facing similar challenges:

  • Customers demand compelling products delivered on more frequent cycles.  
  • Products have become a complex mixture of mechanical, electrical and embedded software systems.  
  • Global markets offer more opportunity, but also more competition.

To remain competitive, companies must deliver innovative products to market faster and at a lower cost. But the pressure to innovate more quickly and move even faster is relentless. Simulation has long been a valuable tool to verify designs and reduce testing, saving both time and money, but using simulation towards the end of the product design cycle is no longer sufficient.  Continue reading

Can CAE Vendor Consolidation Still Meet Engineering’s Needs ?

CAE vendor consolidationEngineering teams and IT managers have been at constant odds with each other over vendor consolidation. IT wants to reduce costs by consolidating applications, Engineering wants best-in-class tools for specific tasks at hand. Over the past fifteen years, Engineering has had their way, and the IT organization has been left with a web of suppliers and tools to manage. Continue reading

Sustainable Model-Based Systems Engineering Initiatives

emedded software blueThe model-based systems engineering journey is evolutionary, not revolutionary. Deployment often starts with a single project or disciplinary area and becomes more sustainable as its business value is demonstrated. We’ve been studying MBSE deployments and the business value it delivers for some time now. Below I’ve shared some key success factors we’ve observed with deploying a sustainable MBSE initiatives, but first I’d like to share and event coming up that I think you may enjoy. Continue reading

Model-Based Systems Engineering – Measuring Success

Today’s blog post is a continuation of a series on Systems Engineering for Smart Products. Remember the old Xerox commercial featuring a monk tasked with making 500 copies of a multi-page, handwritten document? Well, fast forward to 2014 and replace the monk with a systems engineer verifying hundreds of requirements against a textual-based description of a product, and you have a typical scene playing out across many engineering enterprises. Continue reading

Deploying Model-Based Systems Engineering within the Enterprise

systems engineering imageToday’s blog post is a continuation of a series on Systems Engineering for Smart Products. In my previous posting, I described how traditional systems engineering has evolved to model-based systems engineering (MBSE), in which the authoritative system definition no longer resides in a set of static text-based design documents, but rather in a dynamic model.

While the benefits of MBSE have been extensively documented, there has been little guidance on how to successfully deploy MBSE within an engineering enterprise. Through engagements with many A&D, automotive and energy companies, we have identified the following success factors. Continue reading

Systems Engineering for Smart Products

I’ve got a lot to say about Systems Engineering for Smart Products, so this is the first in a series of blogs. In nearly every industry, consumers are benefiting from the evolution of smart products. These are highly-engineered, multi-functional products that interact with people and their environments in new ways to ensure our safety, improve efficiency or reduce energy consumption. Under the hood of every smart product is a complex system (or a series of subsystems) of micro-electronics, embedded software and advanced sensor technology that have to operate in unison to measure operating conditions, predict future events, communicate with other devices, and respond to changes faster and more accurately.

Engineering these systems into a commercially viable product is far from trivial. Today’s smart products have thousands of unique requirements that need to be served by a multiplicity of subsystems and components. Each component may have hundreds of design parameters and multiple interfaces that need to be engineered, verified and validated. The endless design dimensions present opportunities for innovation, as well as for design failures, which may result in recalls, lost revenue and a tarnished corporate brand. Continue reading