About Thierry Marchal

Thierry Marchal is the Industry Director for Healthcare, Construction and Consumer Products at ANSYS, Inc., a role he has held since 2006. In his two decades of professional experience, Thierry has worked as a Global Material Market Segment Manager with Fluent, Inc., and Product Manager with Polyflow. Beyond his usual professional responsibilities he also directs ANSYS's global thought leadership initiative. Thierry holds a degree in Mechanical Engineering and a MBA in Marketing both from Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. View Thierry Marchal's LinkedIn profile

3 Milestones on Our Way to the Medical Digital Twin: ANSYS Leads the Charge

In September 2016, I wrote about the medical digital twin concept. I continue to read numerous articles showing confidence that we are indeed on our way towards the medical digital twin. One particular article from the BBC nicely described how our heart digital twin could prevent its failure. If everybody agrees this is the direction we need to follow, many think that the medical digital twin is a concept way ahead in the future.

I slightly disagree as there are 3 major on-going initiatives paving the way to the medical digital twin likely to reach key milestones in the foreseeable future: Continue reading

No Heartbreak, No Heart Failure: This is Valentine’s day!

If one thing is forbidden today, it is a broken heart or heart failure. Both are extremely complex matters. For the first one, I have only pragmatic, personal but successful experience. For the second one, my job gives me the gift of new understanding and knowledge every day, enabling me to imagine the fantastic engineering complexity of the heart. Yet, it is fascinating to analyze the parallels between the two topics. Continue reading

High Cost of Healthcare Calls for New Technologies

healthcare medical devicesThe unacceptably high cost of healthcare calls for new technologies to make medicine more accessible and affordable as well as to face the challenges of an aging population. However, the overarching tenet remains patient safety, and government regulations ensure that medical products and treatments will do no harm despite the large human variability. But at what price? The years-long R&D and approval cycle drives up medical costs. The good news is that the industry benefits significantly from global rapid technology innovation, leveraging high-tech advances from miniaturization to wireless to intelligent software. Continue reading

Technologia et Circenses et ANSYS Sports

Running with determinationIn just a few days, millions of eyes will be on the biggest sporting event of the summer. This upcoming major international multi-sport event is due to take place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from August 5th to the 21st. For those of us participating in sport or simply keen to watch these events, I think this will be a fantastic firework of performances, achievements and discoveries of sports that we barely know but that we might be watching with great interest. Continue reading

Simulating Smart Medical Implants for the Medical IoT

Digital health technology is taking the healthcare industry by storm and is expected to reach $233.3 billion by 2020, driven particularly by the mobile health market. Connected medical devices and associated services offer safer and more effective healthcare through real-time monitoring of patient adherence, disease state, and procedure recovery. Examples include pill bottles that remind patients when it’s time to take a medication, watches that monitor heart rate and automated insulin pumps that monitor and respond to blood glucose levels. Each of these rely on the premise that early detection of an emerging problem enables a preemptive treatment response, maximizing the chances of successful treatment in the most cost-effective way.   Continue reading

Feather or Synthetic Shuttlecock Design to Win the Game?

Every Friday night, I’m playing badminton with a few friends in my village of Perwez in Belgium. Beyond the motivation of staying fit and healthy while having good time, I’m also pushed by the strong desire to defeat my friend and colleague Michel Rochette from our Lyon office. Occasionally, we are organizing international games to challenge each other and so far, the results are very tight. But I now have a winning strategy!  Continue reading

10 Compelling Reasons to Upgrade to ANSYS 17 for Healthcare Applications

On January 27, ANSYS released its biggest version ever, ANSYS 17.0. Although the ANSYS simulation platform is renowned for its comprehensive coverage of virtually every industry through its extensive range of simulation tools, this latest release is particularly suited for the healthcare industry, whether you are modeling structural, fluid or electromagnetic applications — not to mention those of you engaged with multiphysics modeling. Among the hundreds of new features coming with this release, it might be easy to miss those which are truly important for the medical device, pharmaceutical or clinical sectors.  Let me highlight 3 new or enhanced capabilities. Continue reading

In Silico Medicine: Let’s Do It … TOGETHER … NOW!

in silico simulation2015 was a fantastic year for the medical Internet of Things (Medical IoT), in silico clinical trials and personalized medicine. Many thought leaders and industry pioneers elaborated exciting visions. Leading regulatory authorities, such as the FDA, encouraged a number of innovative approaches, including the large-scale adoption of computer-based models to streamline the regulatory approval process. Continue reading

3 Things High-Tech Companies Should Consider When Entering the Healthcare Market

Head_SARBecause of the growing emphasis on the Internet of Things (IoT), a large number of analysts see the healthcare market as one of the biggest opportunities for high-tech. As a specialist in the healthcare business, I certainly agree that the next major step for healthcare requires treating pathologies in the very early stages, what IoT technology will enable. Early treatments are usually easier, cheaper and maximize the chance for a complete cure. This is called P4 medicine — preventive, participatory, predictive, personalized. But this requires continuously measuring many parameters within our bodies. If we don’t want to live with our physician, we need to wear the necessary measurement equipment and this is where the new high-tech industry plays a role. Continue reading

Monthly Healthcare Webinar: Sharing Knowledge to Innovate Faster

This is very frustrating. I have the chance to travel quite a bit and meet with numerous medical partners —academic leaders, industrial experts, thought leaders and medical device executives. Many of them are as passionate as I am about using simulation to accelerate the pace of innovation for medical device and pharmaceutical solutions. Yet, most of them are amazed when I show them some of the achievements of their peers. Some simply didn’t know that this application or model was possible to simulate or didn’t know how to do it .If all of them would share great results in their areas of expertise then everyone could learn and benefit.

This is not acceptable for an industry where our pace of innovation means better comfort, less pain or perhaps survival for the patient! Continue reading