MUR Motorsports Leverages ANSYS Simulation to Win

As the winners of the Formula SAE competition Australia last year, MUR Motorsports is looking to repeat our success by designing a more aggressive aerodynamics package and optimizing the weight of the vehicle. These targets were deemed by our in-house lap simulator to be two of the driving factors for winning the F-SAE Australasian competition in December. To effectively manage our workload and streamline the design process, we used ANSYS simulation software in almost all of our subteam’s design processes. Continue reading

Electromagnetic Braking Simulation by the CMU Hyperloop Team

Elon Musk’s Hyperloop concept, a futuristic train in a pneumatic tube that propels passengers across the country at near super-sonic speeds, could — if successful — revolutionize mass transportation. The Hyperloop, theoretically, can achieve fantastic speeds of up to 760 miles an hour because the train — or pod — magnetically levitates over an I-rail track inside the continuous metal tube, eliminating friction, while the vacuum in the tube itself minimizes air resistance and drag.

As a competitor in the Spacex Hyperloop pod competition, Carnegie Mellon University’s Hyperloop team is building a version of the Hyperloop pod using simulation with the theory that electromagnetic braking is the most effective way to slow the Hyperloop pod. Continue reading

AirLoom Energy On Track to Replace Wind Turbine Using Simulation

AirLoom Energy (from left to right): Mookwon Seo (engineer), Olivia Lim (engineer), Robert Lumley (president), Blossom Ko (operations). Additional staff (not pictured): Lance Goode (systems administrator), Josh Hamblin (engineer)

AirLoom Energy (from left to right): Mookwon Seo (engineer), Olivia Lim (engineer), Robert Lumley (president), Blossom Ko (operations). Additional staff (not pictured): Lance Goode (systems administrator), Josh Hamblin (engineer)

Breakthrough energy innovation comes in many forms, as we at AirLoom Energy are proving with our revolutionary design of an alternative to the wind turbine. AirLoom Energy is a startup wind energy company housed at the incubator program (WTBC) at the University of Wyoming, home of the Cowboys football team and big, BIG wind. We were recently awarded an SBIR grant from the National Science Foundation to support the prototype development of our novel AirLoom wind power generation technology, a milestone that can be credited in large part to support received through the ANSYS Startup program. Continue reading

RIT SAE Team Developing Snowmobile Using ANSYS

image001RIT Clean Snowmobile Team SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) is a student organized team that is designing, building, and racing a low emissions and high efficiency snowmobile in the SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge. The Clean Snowmobile Challenge (CSC) is an engineering design competition for college and university students that challenges future engineers to redesign an existing snowmobile for reducing emissions and noise. The intent of the competition is to develop a snowmobile that is acceptable for use in environmentally sensitive areas, such as our National Parks and other pristine regions. Continue reading

SGI and ANSYS Achieve New World Record in HPC

Looking back at the past couple of years of extraordinary joint engineering projects SGI and ANSYS have undertaken, it is clear to me that when a synergetic hardware and software partnership is established you, our joint customers, are the clear beneficiary. To that end, I would like to walk you through four such examples.

The first example was outlined over a year ago in my ANSYS guest blog, “Solving the Impossible Electromagnetic Simulation with HPC” where with a “grand challenge” benchmark we jointly demonstrated that the SGI® UV platform and ANSYS HFSS software could solve very large, high frequency electromagnetics problems like cosite analysis and radar cross section (RCS) analysis, as well as allow multiple frequency sweeps to be run without running out of computer system memory. Continue reading

BorgWarner Goes Full Speed with ANSYS HPC Parametric Packs

It doesn’t matter what car you drive — it could be a snazzy Ferrari or a humble FIAT Punto — ultimately what we’re all looking for is a car that performs well and maybe saves us a little money at the pump.

The upcoming joint ANSYS-ESTECO webinar on September 15th will discuss just how important a single component, in this case, a tensioner arm, can be. Chain tensioner arms may not be as well known as pistons and gearboxes, but, by maintaining the correct amount of tension on the chain at all times throughout its duty cycle, they are important for reliable operation of the accessory chain drive system. The chain tensioner also helps protect other components, such as the alternator and water pump, from undue stress and premature failure. A well-designed chain tensioner can also help boost engine performance and efficiency. Continue reading

Scaling ANSYS-Related Workloads to Increase Performance

Manufacturers are under intense pressure to create and introduce new products on a consistent basis in order to remain competitive. Those that can conceive, develop, test and bring products to market quickly stand to realize improvements to overall business performance and profitability.

Computer-aided engineering (CAE) streamlines the product development process and drives faster time-to-market by helping manufacturers resolve design challenges, forecast real world product performance and test fewer prototypes.

Best-of-breed CAE software like ANSYS can nurture design innovation and enable faster delivery of more successful product offerings, but only if IT can scale to support a wide range of CAE applications and workloads. Continue reading

Should They Ban Motorcycles from Cycling Races?

The former Belgian top cyclist Johan Museeuw once stated: “Crashing is part of cycling as crying is part of love.” Indeed, probably every elite cyclist has experienced in-race crashes that put him or her in the hospital. But recently, things seem to have become much worse. In the past two years, many prestigious elite races have been stained by serious crashes between riders and in-race motorcycles. The tragic culmination so far of these crashes was reached on 27 March 2016, when Belgian rider Antoine Demoitié got hit by a motorcycle in the race Gent-Wevelgem and died later in hospital due to his injuries. Later, on 28 May 2016, 19 cyclists were involved in a major crash with two motorcycles, which put Belgian rider Stig Broeckx in hospital in a coma. Continue reading

Upstream and Downstream of a Hyperloop Pod

If you’re a regular subscriber of the ANSYS blog, you’ve probably already heard about Elon Musk’s Hyperloop Pod Competition. Texas Guadaloop is a team from the University of Texas at Austin that was chosen to participate in this Hyperloop Design Weekend Competition back in late January among 150 other teams after SpaceX accepted our preliminary Design package.

From the beginning of our design iteration, Guadaloop has been committed to creating a simple and executable design. One of the major challenges we encountered in the external configuration of our pod design was determining the aerodynamic viability of propelling our pod through a tube. With the elimination of a compressor in our design, the Kantrowitz limit needed to be actively combated. Continue reading

Advanced Mesh Morphing in ANSYS Mechanical

It is a great pleasure to guest blog for ANSYS again after my post in 2014 entitled Reshaping the Future of CFD Using Mesh Morphing. We continue to increase our commitment to deliver the high-performance mesh morphing technology of RBF Morph and began our new product project at the beginning of 2014.

We presented the first industrial applications at the Automotive Simulation World Congress in Tokyo in October 2014, and officially launched the RBF Morph ACT Extension on the market at the ANSYS Italian UGM in May 2015. At the end of 2015, we posted a free version (with limited functionality) in the ANSYS App Store. Continue reading