Constitutive Modeling of 3D Printed FDM Parts: Part 2 (Approaches)

In part 1 of this two-part post, I reviewed the challenges in the constitutive modeling of 3D printed parts using the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process. In this second part, I discuss some of the approaches that may be used to enable analyses of FDM parts even in presence of these challenges. I present them below in increasing order of the detail captured by the model. Continue reading

Constitutive Modeling of 3D Printed FDM Parts: Part 1 (Challenges)

Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is increasingly being used to make functional plastic parts in the aerospace industry and this trend is expected to continue and grow in other industries as well. All functional parts have an expected performance that they must sustain during their lifetime. Ensuring this performance is attained is crucial for aerospace components, but important in all applications. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is an important predictor of part performance in a wide range of industries, but this is not straightforward for the simulation of FDM parts due to difficulties in accurately representing the material behavior in a constitutive model. In part 1 of this article, I list some of the challenges in the development of constitutive models for FDM parts. In part 2, I will discuss possible approaches to addressing these challenges while developing constitutive models that offer some value to the analyst. Continue reading

Improving Hydro Turbines for Developing Countries using ANSYS CFD

Our research is motivated by the need to design more efficient, yet simple in design and inexpensive to manufacture, crossflow turbines for small-scale hydro systems. In the past, the cost and ease to design and manufacture were the key design objectives and their efficiency was less important, because small-scale systems were mostly installed in remote locations where there are no resource constraints (e.g. head and flow rate). However, in today’s and future energy systems, efficiency along with the cost and ease to manufacture, is a critical design consideration to optimize resource utilization and improve sustainability of such systems. Continue reading

Upshift Into the Next Gear With ANSYS AIM

In my almost 20 years of work at CADFEM, an Elite channel partner of ANSYS in central Europe, I have seen a continuous transition in the usage of simulation from experts to development engineers. One big step in this direction was the introduction of ANSYS Workbench. A second — often undervalued — approach, how simulation helps our customers in a better product development is the usage of automated simulation processes by implementing products such as ANSYS AIM. Continue reading

HyperXite and the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Design Contest

Editors Note: Today’s Guest Blog is brought to you by HyperXite’s Project Leads at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) who are competing in the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Design Contest.

What if there was a system of transportation cheaper, faster and most importantly, safer than driving, flying or boating? This next evolution in transportation is the Hyperloop, to design and build a pod that can transport 840 people between Los Angeles and San Francisco at 760 mph while floating on a cushion of air. Developing this technology is, however, a huge endeavor and the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Design Contest was created to ‘crowd source’ the design of the vessel. Continue reading

Solving the Impossible Electromagnetic Simulation with HPC

solving impossible electromagnetic simulation

I was speaking with an ANSYS HFSS developer about a year ago when he mentioned they were starting to see customers who wanted to run 3-D full wave electromagnetic field simulations that would need more than a terabyte of computer system memory, something this developer hadn’t been able to do before. Continue reading

Could a Car Following a Cyclist Determine the Tour de France Outcome?

This Sunday one of the most popular sporting events for tens of million people around the world begins. The Tour de France starts in Utrecht, the Netherlands. We will again see the world’s best top athletes fighting for the stage victory every day. We’ll admire them as they climb the steepest slope at an amazing speed and be impressed to see them completing a time trial at an average speed above 50 km/h. Throughout the past years, the regulations have continuously improved to guarantee a clean and fair race. As an example, during time trials, neither cars nor motorbikes are allowed in front of the cyclists as this would obviously reduce air resistance. Similarly, if a cyclist is catching up to the one ahead, they must stay on different sides of the road. However, there is no regulation to prevent a vehicle from following the athlete as it is commonly believed that a car riding behind a cyclist cannot influence him.

But is this really true?

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Guest Blog: Turbulent Combustion Modeling at CRAFT Tech

craft tech temperature contours combustion modelingCRAFT Tech (Combustion Research and Flow Technology, Inc.) is a small and well-established CFD consulting firm that specializes in addressing unique and challenging problems for both government and commercial customers. The focus of two recent projects was the accurate modeling of flame extinction and blow-out effects in aircraft propulsion and power generation systems. Within these applications there are strong interactions of flow turbulence with the flame dynamics. Continue reading

Aircraft Cabin Airflow: Curbing Disease Spread

For me, science and engineering has always been about designing solutions to the various problems in our everyday lives. When I began doing research in seventh grade, my very first project was a roof that converted the impact energy of precipitation into electricity to help power the home. The following year, I came up with a dynamically supportive knee brace that implements smart fluids to vary the amount of support that patients received, depending on the physical activity. Last year, I created a self-cleaning outdoor garbage bin to tackle the issue of urban sanitation in our neighborhoods.

raymond wang intel science fair winnerYet perhaps, I am best known for my most recent project, which won the 2015 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, out of 1,700 students nationally selected from 75+ countries. This year, I tackled the issue of airborne pathogen spread in aircraft cabins, generating the industry’s first high fidelity simulations of airflow inside airplane cabins. Using my insights, I engineered economically feasible solutions that altered cabin airflow patterns, creating personalized breathing zones for each individual passenger to effectively curb pathogen inhalation by up to 55 times and improve fresh air inhalation by more than 190%. Continue reading

Using ANSYS CFD to Analyze High-Lift Wing Design

Agastya ParikhFour years ago, as a high school sophomore, I began work on an independent project that explored ways to improve the performance of high-lift systems used on the Airbus A330-300. One of the biggest challenges facing me was how to best conduct experiments to assess the performance of the different designs. In prior years, I had conducted simple research on aircraft wing design and aeroelasticity using unpowered balsa models of the aircraft being tested. To employ this same method would be unworkable for the relatively complex systems of flaps and slats required by the Airbus aircraft. I would have needed to build a larger scale model or perform wind-tunnel testing — neither of which was viable because I did not have access to equipment of the complexity required. Continue reading