Should They Ban Motorcycles from Cycling Races?

The former Belgian top cyclist Johan Museeuw once stated: “Crashing is part of cycling as crying is part of love.” Indeed, probably every elite cyclist has experienced in-race crashes that put him or her in the hospital. But recently, things seem to have become much worse. In the past two years, many prestigious elite races have been stained by serious crashes between riders and in-race motorcycles. The tragic culmination so far of these crashes was reached on 27 March 2016, when Belgian rider Antoine Demoitié got hit by a motorcycle in the race Gent-Wevelgem and died later in hospital due to his injuries. Later, on 28 May 2016, 19 cyclists were involved in a major crash with two motorcycles, which put Belgian rider Stig Broeckx in hospital in a coma. Continue reading

Upstream and Downstream of a Hyperloop Pod

If you’re a regular subscriber of the ANSYS blog, you’ve probably already heard about Elon Musk’s Hyperloop Pod Competition. Texas Guadaloop is a team from the University of Texas at Austin that was chosen to participate in this Hyperloop Design Weekend Competition back in late January among 150 other teams after SpaceX accepted our preliminary Design package.

From the beginning of our design iteration, Guadaloop has been committed to creating a simple and executable design. One of the major challenges we encountered in the external configuration of our pod design was determining the aerodynamic viability of propelling our pod through a tube. With the elimination of a compressor in our design, the Kantrowitz limit needed to be actively combated. Continue reading

Advanced Mesh Morphing in ANSYS Mechanical

It is a great pleasure to guest blog for ANSYS again after my post in 2014 entitled Reshaping the Future of CFD Using Mesh Morphing. We continue to increase our commitment to deliver the high-performance mesh morphing technology of RBF Morph and began our new product project at the beginning of 2014.

We presented the first industrial applications at the Automotive Simulation World Congress in Tokyo in October 2014, and officially launched the RBF Morph ACT Extension on the market at the ANSYS Italian UGM in May 2015. At the end of 2015, we posted a free version (with limited functionality) in the ANSYS App Store. Continue reading

Tools of the Trade – Preparing Students for the Real World with ANSYS AIM

Preparing students for the real world means introducing them to industry-standard tools such as ANSYS AIM — as early as sophomore year.

Undergraduate engineering students are incredibly busy, overloaded with curricular activities. My mechanical and mechatronics engineering students carry a load of five courses in such complex subjects as mathematics, physics, materials, thermal science, and automation and control. Every four months, they also complete a co-operative education term in industry.

Because undergrads are so busy, I was shocked two years ago when a group of second-year students approached me about incorporating a new project into an already-challenging class, numerical methods. Continue reading

Calsol Solar Team Produced Optimized Design Using Simulation

CalSol Solar Vehicle Team, UC Berkeley, is a student-run organization that designs, builds, tests, and races solar vehicles capable of traveling at highway speeds. Through participation in solar races and alternative energy as well as community outreach events, the team also aims to raise awareness of solar energy while focusing on the engineering challenges inherent in solar vehicle technology.

image001

In order to be a competitive vehicle team, an aerodynamic vehicle design and good battery cooling systems are very important. Continue reading

Seamless Integration of FKM Guideline in ANSYS Workbench with ACT

As we all know, a frequent challenge in FEM is the evaluation of stress results, in particular with cyclic stresses. The FKM guideline “Analytical Strength Assessment of Components” describes a static strength assessment as well as a fatigue strength assessment. This guideline was developed by the Advisory Board for Engineering and Research for various applications in mechanical engineering and other sectors. Continue reading

BadgerLoop Takes Number 3 Spot at Hyperloop Competition

badgerloop hyperloop competition ansysOur story began in the afternoon of Monday, June 15, 2015. It was just like any other day until an email with SpaceX’s announcement of a Hyperloop competition was received. We got to thinking and within a week, BadgerLoop was created purely by word of mouth. 15 students worked from around the world, while on summer internships, to solidify the core of BadgerLoop. Continue reading

Incredible High Frequency Design Accuracy with ANSYS HFSS and Modelithics Models

In the five short years that I have been in the RF and Microwave design industry, I have seen the demand (and need) for quick and accurate electronic design simulations escalate rapidly. I have also had the opportunity to interact with many design engineers during this time who have come to the same conclusion – they need more accuracy. Whereas ideal component simulation models or s-parameter files were once acceptable, this is much less often the case now. Parasitics have a considerable effect on component response, and even more so as design frequency increases. Labor and material costs multiply with each design iteration, so it is very important to limit these cycles and achieve a successful design early on. Continue reading

Constitutive Modeling of 3D Printed FDM Parts: Part 2 (Approaches)

In part 1 of this two-part post, I reviewed the challenges in the constitutive modeling of 3D printed parts using the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process. In this second part, I discuss some of the approaches that may be used to enable analyses of FDM parts even in presence of these challenges. I present them below in increasing order of the detail captured by the model. Continue reading

Constitutive Modeling of 3D Printed FDM Parts: Part 1 (Challenges)

Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is increasingly being used to make functional plastic parts in the aerospace industry and this trend is expected to continue and grow in other industries as well. All functional parts have an expected performance that they must sustain during their lifetime. Ensuring this performance is attained is crucial for aerospace components, but important in all applications. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is an important predictor of part performance in a wide range of industries, but this is not straightforward for the simulation of FDM parts due to difficulties in accurately representing the material behavior in a constitutive model. In part 1 of this article, I list some of the challenges in the development of constitutive models for FDM parts. In part 2, I will discuss possible approaches to addressing these challenges while developing constitutive models that offer some value to the analyst. Continue reading