Hybrid Aircraft with Distributed Electric Propulsion

Courtesy Mark Moore, Design Engineer at NASA Langley Research Center

Courtesy Mark Moore, Design Engineer at NASA Langley Research Center

Recently, when I attended the AIAA SciTech2014 Conference, I was impressed by a talk about electric aircraft, with a focus on distributed electric propulsion, presented by Mark Moore, a Design Engineer at NASA Langley Research Center. After returning from the conference, I started to read more about these concepts — especially looking for the benefits, challenges and most importantly to see how ANSYS simulation tools can help address the challenges.

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Ocean Waves – A Nightmare for Offshore Structures

You may have heard about the grounding of an Alaskan oil rig in January, 2013. The 28,000-tonne rig was pushed toward the shore by waves up to 35 feet and winds up to 62 mph, dragging its main towing vessel and a tug behind it. There have been several such oil rig incidents over the past few decades. The below image shows the failure of an another oil rig platform due to extreme wave forces. A huge wave hitting the offshore platform leads to high wave impact loads that can eventually result in significant platform damage and collapse. These incidents can cause fatalities and damages that can cost hundreds of millions of dollars. Continue reading

Simplifying Fatigue Analysis

iStock_failed wind turbineOne way to measure the effectiveness of engineering software is the amount of time it takes to reach a sufficiently accurate solution. Simulations by definition are an approximation of reality. Those who solve complex problems— using structural, fatigue analysis, CFD, electronics —  know that we have to pay for more accuracy with additional work and/or longer computing time.

Best in class software enables the user to capture the majority of work done, so it need not be repeated again and again, after all repetition is best done by computers. In this blog we will focus on fatigue simulation, which at first glance can be daunting to new users. There are several different solution methods that can be used with numerous additional correction factors available in most durability programs. There is a “best” combination of methods for most types of problems, which can be guided by experience and expertise. The ability to encapsulate the most appropriate method in a “fatigue workflow” as implemented in ANSYS nCode DesignLife is a major labor saving feature. Continue reading

Prof Bert Blocken Kicks off CFD MOOC This Month

“Sports and Building Aerodynamics”, MOOC  with Professor Bert Blocken

“Sports and Building Aerodynamics”, MOOC with Professor Bert Blocken

A fun and interesting online course to learn fluid mechanics and CFD as well as how they are applied to sports and environments around buildings is coming up soon. In his MOOC (Massively Open Online Course) entitled “Sports and Building Aerodynamics,” Professor Bert Blocken of Eindhoven  University of Technology (TU/e) plans to introduce wind tunnel testing and the use of ANSYS CFD. The course begins April 28, 2014.

You might have wondered about how aerodynamic shaping of cars, bikes, etc. affects the win/loss or margin of victory in a race. This course will give you insights about how the physics shapes these objects and influences performance. Continue reading

Reshaping the Future of CFD Using Mesh Morphing

A cool title, isn’t it? Hello ANSYS blog readers! This is my first time in this blog as a guest blogger. You will notice a brief resume of mine together my photo as the author of this post, but let me introduce myself so that you can understand why I am here writing about mesh morphing to the ANSYS audience.

I am a Professor at University of Rome, with good experience in fluid structure interaction (FSI) and Fluent customization using UDF programming. Five years ago, driven by a Formula 1 Top Team, I developed a powerful mesh morphing tool crafted by tough specifications. Managing any kind of mesh, precise, fast and parallel! Nothing at that time was able to do this kind of job. We tried to go with (RBFs) Radial Basis Functions mesh morphing, one of the most promising techniques. And we made it. Continue reading

Designing Cool, Wearable Electronics with ANSYS and Synapse

nike fuel band Hardly a day goes by when we don’t hear about the upcoming revolution in wearable devices or the Internet of Things (IoT). The $3.2B acquisition of Nest® by Google clearly got noticed by all of us. But, the Nest thermostat is just one example of connected devices that are poised to change our lives over the coming years. The Nike FuelBand® and Fitbit® have already been helping us shape up for some time. Continue reading

How Can You Get More From An Oil Pump?

Imagine you have an oil pump in your car that has its outlet blocked. The pump is trying to throw the oil out but since the outlet is blocked the pressure in the pump keeps increasing. The excessive pressure that develops in the pump can be catastrophic to its strength and therefore life. This is precisely what happens when you try to operate the pump under extreme cold conditions, when the viscosity of the lubricant increases so much that the pump almost behaves as if its outlet has been blocked.

pumpsThis is a very common design scenario for pump manufacturers. Estimation of what is called as “shut-off” pressure and its implications on the structural integrity of the pump are key concepts that every pump manufacturer should bear in mind while designing pumps. Interestingly, simulations today allow manufacturers to develop deep understanding of such phenomenon and help them to design pumps, that perhaps they could not have, with just physical testing and prototyping. Continue reading

Educating the Next Generation of Engineers

This is an exciting time at universities and colleges around the world. Innovations in education make it easier, more accessible and more fun for students to learn — and for professors to educate the next generation of engineers. The rapid pace of interdisciplinary, collaborative academic research is directly (and indirectly, through relationships with industry) reshaping our daily lives in ways we could not have imagined a decade ago. More students participate in the challenge of gaining engineering knowledge today than ever before. In the classroom, in the lab or during student competitions, computer-aided simulation is a vital tool in engineering education. Our latest issue of ANSYS Advantage magazine features how the academic world uses engineering simulation. Continue reading