Why Antares Launch Failure Isn’t a Failure

NASA TV shows Orbital Sciences Corp.'s unmanned rocket blowing up

Photo: NASA TV, AP

Pushing the frontiers of space exploration is risky business. One thing that history has taught is that setbacks remain as inevitable as successes. Indeed it could be argued that the setbacks are a necessary component of the successes. That’s one indispensable truth we all can take away from Tuesday’s Antares launch failure on Virginia’s Eastern shores. It doesn’t dampen the exciting frontiers we envision when commercial interests, as well as policymakers, propel forward space exploration. Newscasters can play Monday morning quarterback on the failure of the Orbital Science launch, in which nobody was killed or injured, but they’ll be in a tough spot if they try to deny that this is anything more than growing pains in the emerging commercialization of the space industry. Continue reading

Getting the Right Prosthetic Hip Implant Positioning

I’ve had many conversations with customers who struggle with their reality that it can be very costly and time-consuming for manufacturers to predict the performance of medical devices. They wonder how to address these problems using modelling and simulation to help evaluate devices at an early stage of their development. Given the recent success of the Medical Device Innovation Summit, it was clear to me that there are a lot of exciting developments taking place by using ANSYS for this purpose, whether it involves orthopaedic implants, stents or other devices. Continue reading

Lebanese Students Overcome Many Challenges to Build an Unmanned Aircraft

image of Lebanese American University Airplane LAU Solix

Lebanese American University Airplane LAU Solix

The Lebanese American University (LAU) challenged its students to design an unmanned aircraft capable of long flights at high altitudes. Our LAU Solix Team, comprised of eight mechanical engineering students, is very familiar with ANSYS tools and is skilled at handling CFD and fluid–structure interaction (FSI) simulations so we put these tools to work on our unmanned aircraft design. The team had to deal with the interaction that happens between fluid and structure that occurs in a wide range of engineering problems — especially in aircraft design. Continue reading

Turbomachinery and Pump Symposia: Industry Consolidation

Industry consolidation was one topic of discussion as my colleague-in-turbomachinery Bill Holmes and I and recently returned from the Turbomachinery & Pump Symposia. The event is organized by the Texas A&M University Turbomachinery Laboratory and held at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston Texas. Only a few years back the pump and turbomachinery shows were separate. With the amalgamation one is now able to view a large array of impressive hardware and attend informative technical sessions applicable to the full range of equipment: pumps, compressors, turbines, fan, blowers and all related components and services. The emphasis is on Oil & Gas machinery, although not exclusively as there are synergies with power generation, chemical process, air separation etc. Continue reading

Modeling Waves to Keep the Sea Clean

In 2013, over 4400 million tonnes of crude oil was extracted, which caters to roughly 33% of the global need for energy. Most of this oil is extracted from offshore sites and transported to shores for further processing. During this production and transport, if an accidental release of the crude or processed oil occurs, it is called Oil Spill. With the advancement of technology, volumes of oil spilled have reduced over last few decades, however, factors of human error and natural calamity can never be completely ruled out. Continue reading

When Universities Fly High – University of Naples

20140226_135427 (1)We are pleased to present a guest blog from Giovanni Paolo Reina and Angelo Della Sala at the University of Naples.

The weapon-aircraft integration is one of the most important aspects in military aircraft design and for the study of its performances. In particular store separation problems, i.e. problems related to the release of underwing bodies during the flight, are very critical because they occur during a flight operating condition. Continue reading

Six Myths of High-Performance Computing (Part 2)

In the first part of this two-part post about high-performance computing, I already addressed three commonly-held myths associated with HPC. Now I’ll address three myths that are related to particular concerns about HPC adoption.

Myth #4: “Without internal IT support, HPC cluster adoption is undoable” Continue reading

Shorter Design Cycles and Multiple Iterations Within Easy Reach

You’ve heard all the talk about simulation-based design. You’ve listened to colleagues— maybe even some of your competitors — wax on about how doing robust simulation studies early on in the design cycle leads to more and better product ideas while also optimizing use of materials. In fact, you’re sold on the need to embrace advanced analysis, but you just don’t see how it’s feasible given the perceived complexity and cost of the simulation software — not to mention, the high-powered workstation gear. Continue reading