How to Avoid Turbulence in Cloud Computing

seat belts turbulence clouds“Please fasten your seat belts, we may encounter some turbulence as we enter the clouds ahead,” the pilot announced on my flight back from a big computer conference in Denver last month. The lady sitting next to me leaned over and admitted: “I never really understand what the pilot means by that announcement.” It reminded me that you may also need some clarity about cloud computing for your ANSYS simulations.

Bumps along a cloud-computing journey can be caused by concerns about security and where the data is stored, lack of licensing options and/or end-user productivity. We have taken steps to ensure you can move in and out of the cloud smoothly, and in analogy with what I just wrote: in our case “no seat belts required.”

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The Australian Formula Collective Designs Winning Race Car Components using ANSYS Simulation Solutions

The University of Western Australia Motorsport team has competed in Formula SAE Australasia since 2001. With the help of ANSYS pervasive engineering simulation solutions, our team has won the event twice, taken the trophy for engineering design four times and collected more than 30 trophies for individual events. As of 2017, we are now partnering with Edith Cowan University Racing, another Western Australian team, in a collaboration known as Australian Formula Collective (AFC).

Western Australia Motorsport teamAustralian Formula Collective with ECU Racing’s Formula SAE vehicle designed with the help of ANSYS simulation solutions.

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Ensuring EMI/EMC Compliance with Electronics Simulation

Today we live in a hyper-connected world, surrounded by smart products. If industry forecasts are correct, by 2020 — just 2 short years from now — there will be over 28 billion internet-connected devices. Beyond smart phones and autonomous vehicles, smart cities, smart factories, and smart homes are also quickly emerging as promising opportunities that could help improve how we live, work and play.

While these new capabilities will be a delight to us as consumers, they are a nightmare for engineers and product designers. With hundreds of sensors, microprocessors, and wired and wireless communication components, engineers face immense challenges in ensuring reliability and performance. In the complex web of electronic circuitry, something, somewhere that is left unaddressed could lead to failure. One of the big challenges confronting product designers is electromagnetic interference, or EMI.

communication channelFull-wave model of communications channel
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Crash, Smash and Splash — Why Safety is Critical for Autonomous Vehicles

There seems to be an unstoppable momentum toward the development and deployment of autonomous vehicles. Almost every day there is a story about the latest advanced driver assistance system (ADAS), drone or supposedly intelligent robot. As this rush to market accelerates, we are also regularly reminded that these technologies remain in their infancy when it comes to full autonomy and the much touted societal benefits it will bring.

autonomous vehicles las vegas bus crashFor example, the Las Vegas self-driving bus was involved in a crash less than two hours into the first day of its career. It stopped when a human-driven truck in front of it stopped, as it was programmed to do, but was powerless when the truck then backed up into its front fender. Whichever vehicle was at fault, the slogan “Look Ma No Driver” in the front window of the bus reads like a child showing off. As we know, pride comes before a fall. Continue reading

Chinook ETS Wind-Powered Car Breaks World Record with the Help of ANSYS

Chinook ETS is a team of student engineers from École de technologie supérieure in Montreal, Canada. We are trying to design and build a prototype wind-powered car with the highest possible efficiency for the Racing Aeolus event held in Den Helder, Netherlands. Our goal is not only to perform well during the race but also to develop efficient wind turbines through numeric simulations, new composites fabrication processes, advanced electronics and out-of-the-box thinking. ANSYS simulation solutions play a key role in our design efforts.chinook team with wind powered car Continue reading

Leveraging Benefits of the Hybrid Cloud for ANSYS Workloads

Engineers at every company are trying to innovate faster while holding down costs. Modeling and engineering simulations are the backbone of these efforts. Engineers may wish to run ANSYS Fluent simulations at scale, or many different permutations simultaneously, that may require more computing resources than are readily available. Hybrid HPC computing combines public and on-premise compute resources to offer organizations a flexible, cost-effective approach to meet these requirements.
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How HyperXite Used ANSYS Simulation to Advance in the Hyperloop Competition

The Hyperloop from SpaceX is the future of fast, affordable and sustainable transportation.  HyperXite, our team from the University of California, Irvine, which is competing in the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition, is using ANSYS Fluent and ANSYS Mechanical simulation solutions to design and build a 1:2 scale Hyperloop pod.

If successful, the pod eventually will be able to transport 840 people between Los Angeles and San Francisco at 760 mph while floating on a cushion of air. Of the 120 teams in the competition, we were the only team in the top five at SpaceX design weekend to propose air levitation as our driving force. Continue reading

Free Performance Benchmark Program

Whenever I speak to our customers who want to run our software on something more powerful than their desktop computers, I hear the need for quantitative proof of HPC benchmark tests. If you have the same need, you can now get that proof, and it won’t cost you a thing.

We’ve established a Free Performance Benchmark program. Instead of demonstrating evidence of the benefits of HPC on standard benchmark models, we want to show you the time savings that HPC can make possible for your very own model. Continue reading

This Is No Simulation: Achieving Zero-G on Earth

I wasn’t expecting my dad to start speaking — especially while were we watching television. Let’s face it: some things are sacrosanct. So, when he started talking during the opening credits of the 1985 miniseries “Space,” I listened.

“All my life,” he said, “I’ve wanted to go in to space. But, I know that that that’s not going to ever happen. Maybe you’ll have the opportunity.”

Fourteen-year-old me had little doubt that I’d explore space, just like Star Trek’s Captain Kirk and Star Wars’ Luke Skywalker. I would, in fact, be the first person on Mars. No doubt about it. Oddly enough, my journalism degree wasn’t exactly the ticket to space. So, like most of us, my feet never left the ground.

Fast forward to last November, when one of our ANSYS employees entered a contest and won a seat on Zero Gravity Corp’s G-Force One. This company, the brainchild of X-Prize Foundation founder Peter Diamandis, sends everyday people on zero-G flights, similar to the ones NASA used uses for astronaut training. As luck would have it, the opportunity to fly with Peter and G-Force One fell to me. Continue reading

NEW ANSYS Student Community is LIVE

I have very exciting news to share with you. The ANSYS Student Community is now live and ready for action. If you are one of the 400,000+ users who have downloaded ANSYS Student Products since their launch in August 2015, you can now communicate with other ANSYS users worldwide via this platform.

The ANSYS Student Community provides a forum to share ideas, ask questions, guide users and post cutting-edge information or useful technical resources. It is primarily intended for students, but academic faculty, staff and other users in academia are welcome to participate. Continue reading