ANSYS Advantage Connects You to IoT

ANSYS Advantage IoTEvery day we hear about a new internet-enabled product — or two, or three, or a dozen. Consumer products are increasingly more connected including appliances, automobiles and traditional electronics like smartphones and tablets. In the industrial world, factories, aircraft, distribution facilities, power plants and many other things are being monitored by sensors and communications networks to provide feedback on production, maintenance and efficiency. Importantly, these devices collect data that allow manufacturers to understand how products are used so that they can develop better things that more closely fit our needs. Engineers designing smart, connected products need to address competing and complex challenges, including size, weight, power, performance, reliability, durability. For example, engineers may need to design reliable sensors, high-speed communication and networking equipment, or supercomputers that process vast amounts of data. How can designers ensure that their products will work flawlessly in the real world? Continue reading

Should They Ban Motorcycles from Cycling Races?

The former Belgian top cyclist Johan Museeuw once stated: “Crashing is part of cycling as crying is part of love.” Indeed, probably every elite cyclist has experienced in-race crashes that put him or her in the hospital. But recently, things seem to have become much worse. In the past two years, many prestigious elite races have been stained by serious crashes between riders and in-race motorcycles. The tragic culmination so far of these crashes was reached on 27 March 2016, when Belgian rider Antoine Demoitié got hit by a motorcycle in the race Gent-Wevelgem and died later in hospital due to his injuries. Later, on 28 May 2016, 19 cyclists were involved in a major crash with two motorcycles, which put Belgian rider Stig Broeckx in hospital in a coma. Continue reading

Wireless Power Transfer (WPT)

Wireless power transfer (WPT) is much researched and discussed in the context of IoT, electric vehicles and mobile electronic devices. The methodology of powering a device without a physical connection is well known. However, designing the coil shapes and their placement, maximizing efficiency and validating behavior at the system level still represent challenges that cannot be achieved without simulation. The next frontier to be explored is extending and applying wireless power transfer systems to more applications, such as continuous charging of multiple devices, increasing the range of efficient power transfer and ensuring the WPT system design meets regulatory guidelines. Continue reading

Thermal Management in Aircraft Cabins

While it only seems like yesterday, it is actually three years ago that I wrote a blog about the important role the Aircraft Environment Control System (ECS) plays in passenger comfort and safety as well as our (ANSYS) participation in Cabin Air Reformative Environment (CARE) consortium.

Those of you who subscribe to the ANSYS Advantage magazine may have read the article on this topic that was published in the most recent edition, but I thought it was about time I provided an update. Continue reading

What Do Airplane Winglets Do?

Airplane WingletsAir travelers can’t help but notice the ever-increasing presence of ‘winglets’ of different sizes and shapes at the tips of airplane wings. And anyone interested in fluid dynamics will no doubt have pondered what these airplane winglets do, how they improve aerodynamics, and why they are becoming almost ubiquitous on aircraft of all commercial manufacturers. Continue reading

Simulating Smart Medical Implants for the Medical IoT

Digital health technology is taking the healthcare industry by storm and is expected to reach $233.3 billion by 2020, driven particularly by the mobile health market. Connected medical devices and associated services offer safer and more effective healthcare through real-time monitoring of patient adherence, disease state, and procedure recovery. Examples include pill bottles that remind patients when it’s time to take a medication, watches that monitor heart rate and automated insulin pumps that monitor and respond to blood glucose levels. Each of these rely on the premise that early detection of an emerging problem enables a preemptive treatment response, maximizing the chances of successful treatment in the most cost-effective way.   Continue reading

ANSYS Student in a Browser Powered by Frame and Microsoft Azure

Last year we announced ANSYS Enterprise Cloud, a complete end-to-end solution for medium-large enterprises, that is currently available on Amazon Web Services (AWS) with plans to support other public cloud providers, such as Microsoft Azure & Google Cloud, in the near future. While our ANSYS Open Cloud Strategy™ is hardware agnostic, giving our customers the option to use their hardware of choice (e.g. private/on premise cloud, public cloud, cloud hosting partners), this is not the only characteristic that makes our offering unique.

We designed our cloud offering to address a complete spectrum of pain points and needs, without forgetting our small-to-medium-sized business customers or the young students that embrace computer-driven engineering simulation for the first time. Continue reading

Creating a Digital Twin of a Pump

Read any industry publication today and the Internet of Things (IoT) is a hot topic.Talk about how products will be connected to each other and interact with users on different levels is everywhere. But is all of this really  possible? Will we see this type of connectivity and interaction any time soon? Gartner, the technology research company, says that there will be 6.4 billion connected devices this year, and many of these will be in the industrial sector. What advantage does this connectivity bring — digital twins, predictive maintenance and predictive analytics. Continue reading

Using Simulation to Address MEMS Design Challenges

When I think of the Internet of Things, I mostly think about the sensors and MEMS devices that make it all work. These tiny devices, often just a few micrometers to a millimeter across, see, hear and measure their immediate environment, either continuously or when asked, triggering an action or recording the data and sending it someplace else. MEMS sensors include gyroscopes, accelerometers, micromirrors, and tiny pressure, humidity and temperature sensors. Just in my immediate vicinity, there are MEMS sensors in my fitness tracker, smart phone, laptop and electronic kettle. MEMS sensors are integral to Connected Soldiers and Connected Cars. Continue reading

ANSYS and Carnegie Mellon University Partner to Drive Industry 4.0

CMU PR logoThe best thing we can do for today’s college students is to prepare them for the real-world challenges they will face upon graduation. For engineering students, ANSYS has long been involved in this process through internships, co-op education opportunities, and promoting the use of our software solutions as learning tools in undergraduate and graduate courses at universities around the world. Today we are excited to be taking another big step along this path by announcing a very special partnership with Carnegie Mellon University and its College of Engineering. Continue reading