AirLoom Energy On Track to Replace Wind Turbine Using Simulation

AirLoom Energy (from left to right): Mookwon Seo (engineer), Olivia Lim (engineer), Robert Lumley (president), Blossom Ko (operations). Additional staff (not pictured): Lance Goode (systems administrator), Josh Hamblin (engineer)

AirLoom Energy (from left to right): Mookwon Seo (engineer), Olivia Lim (engineer), Robert Lumley (president), Blossom Ko (operations). Additional staff (not pictured): Lance Goode (systems administrator), Josh Hamblin (engineer)

Breakthrough energy innovation comes in many forms, as we at AirLoom Energy are proving with our revolutionary design of an alternative to the wind turbine. AirLoom Energy is a startup wind energy company housed at the incubator program (WTBC) at the University of Wyoming, home of the Cowboys football team and big, BIG wind. We were recently awarded an SBIR grant from the National Science Foundation to support the prototype development of our novel AirLoom wind power generation technology, a milestone that can be credited in large part to support received through the ANSYS Startup program. Continue reading

RIT SAE Team Developing Snowmobile Using ANSYS

image001RIT Clean Snowmobile Team SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) is a student organized team that is designing, building, and racing a low emissions and high efficiency snowmobile in the SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge. The Clean Snowmobile Challenge (CSC) is an engineering design competition for college and university students that challenges future engineers to redesign an existing snowmobile for reducing emissions and noise. The intent of the competition is to develop a snowmobile that is acceptable for use in environmentally sensitive areas, such as our National Parks and other pristine regions. Continue reading

The Role of Engineering Simulation in Energy Innovation

engineering simulation energy innovationA few weeks ago, I had the honor and privilege of being one of a few invited attendees at the DOE Mission Innovation Workshop on Grid Modernization. The workshop was hosted by the University of Pittsburgh and held at the Energy Innovation Center. Attendees included leaders from the Department of Energy, Pittsburgh city government officials, community and foundation organizations, and representatives from key local industries — including major utilities, electrical system integrators, electrical system manufacturers and technology companies (like ANSYS).

Pittsburgh, and other similar cities, face significant energy and sustainability challenges over the next few years. These challenges stem primarily from the significant disparity in the goals that have been set — as can be seen in the SmartPGH video — and the current state of the grid and industrial equipment. Continue reading

The Changing Landscape of IoT Product Design

The Gartner Hype Cycle charts are a peek into the future. They graphically project where various technology trends are along a maturity timeline. The most recent Hype Cycle identifies several megatrends, including digital business technologies and new design and innovation approaches, such as IoT product design.

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Indian Startups Don’t Have to Go It Alone Anymore

indian startupsSitting in my office in the innovation capital of India, Bangalore, I read an article that the city alone is home to 65% of Indian startups. India is home to the largest number of startups next to the U.S., UK and China. While India boasts of several billion-dollar ‘unicorns’ in the app and software arena, there are also hardware startups that are making their presence count. For example, Lechal is making haptic footwear for the visually blind, Grey Orange Robotics indigenously developing robotics solutions for e-commerce warehouses and Ezetap converting smartphones into mobile point of sale solutions are just a few hardware companies that are pushing the envelope.

It is estimated that India’s 4200 startups, which includes over 30 hardware startups and over 35 startups in the IoT space, created 80K new jobs by the end of 2015. Over the next four years, the number of Indian startups is expected to rise to 11,500, employing 250k people. Continue reading

SGI and ANSYS Achieve New World Record in HPC

Looking back at the past couple of years of extraordinary joint engineering projects SGI and ANSYS have undertaken, it is clear to me that when a synergetic hardware and software partnership is established you, our joint customers, are the clear beneficiary. To that end, I would like to walk you through four such examples.

The first example was outlined over a year ago in my ANSYS guest blog, “Solving the Impossible Electromagnetic Simulation with HPC” where with a “grand challenge” benchmark we jointly demonstrated that the SGI® UV platform and ANSYS HFSS software could solve very large, high frequency electromagnetics problems like cosite analysis and radar cross section (RCS) analysis, as well as allow multiple frequency sweeps to be run without running out of computer system memory. Continue reading

Maximizing Engineering Throughput with Pay-Per-Use Simulation in the Cloud

My colleagues Steve Del, Giovanni Petrone and I often discuss the benefits of moving engineering simulation to the cloud, marshalling greater computing resources and faster processing on high-performance computing (HPC) solutions. While most companies would find this compelling, budget-conscious companies are concerned about the costs. The missing piece is a pay-per-use simulation business model, where  you use what you need, when you need it, and only pay for what you use.

Well, now that piece is in place. Last week’s release of ANSYS Enterprise Cloud adds support for ANSYS Elastic Licensing™, enabling you to fully leverage the pay-per-use business model on the public cloud for both hardware and software. Continue reading

Antenna Design Workflow with ANSYS 17.2

antenna-designAntennas are the lifeblood of connected, mobile and many emerging IoT products. Consumers expect a reliable connection every time; anything short can kill a product launch or, worse yet, tarnish a corporate brand. That’s the market reality. The engineering reality is that there are significant engineering challenges associated with designing antennas and radio systems, including providing reliable connectivity and maintaining reasonable performance within an ever shrinking design footprint. Many of today’s devices need to operate in an increasingly crowded radio spectrum with the possibility of co-site conditions, operation near the human body and other challenging installed environments. Continue reading

Breakthrough Energy Innovation. What Will You Change Today to Drive Sustainable Design?

Energy efficiency, sustainable design and green products are not new concepts but they are increasingly coming to the fore. Of particular recent note was the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21) meeting in Paris and the commitment to limit global temperature rise to no more than 2 degrees Celsius above pre industrial levels.

Why the increased emphasis and urgency? A widespread and growing recognition that our use of Earth’s resources is accelerating at an unsustainable rate, with measurable consequences. Continue reading

BorgWarner Goes Full Speed with ANSYS HPC Parametric Packs

It doesn’t matter what car you drive — it could be a snazzy Ferrari or a humble FIAT Punto — ultimately what we’re all looking for is a car that performs well and maybe saves us a little money at the pump.

The upcoming joint ANSYS-ESTECO webinar on September 15th will discuss just how important a single component, in this case, a tensioner arm, can be. Chain tensioner arms may not be as well known as pistons and gearboxes, but, by maintaining the correct amount of tension on the chain at all times throughout its duty cycle, they are important for reliable operation of the accessory chain drive system. The chain tensioner also helps protect other components, such as the alternator and water pump, from undue stress and premature failure. A well-designed chain tensioner can also help boost engine performance and efficiency. Continue reading