Brain Simulation

While reading “Out of Our Minds” by Sir Ken Robinson —published in 2003 — one prediction that blew my mind was the possibilities of backing up our brain information. It was not convincing, even considering some forty odd years into the future. I did a Google Search to discover that actually the book quoted a prediction by renowned futurologist Dr. Ian Pearson.

“By about 2040, there will be a backup of our brains in a computer somewhere, so that when you die it won’t be a major career problem.” – Ian Pearson

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5 Improved Workflows for Rotating Machinery Design and Analysis

There were a number of new and exciting workflow enhancements included in ANSYS 16.0 for those who design and analyze rotating machinery to make data transfers and simulation setup easier. Here are the top five enhancements:

1 – BladeGen to BladeEditor

BladeGen Continue reading

3 Things High-Tech Companies Should Consider When Entering the Healthcare Market

Head_SARBecause of the growing emphasis on the Internet of Things (IoT), a large number of analysts see the healthcare market as one of the biggest opportunities for high-tech. As a specialist in the healthcare business, I certainly agree that the next major step for healthcare requires treating pathologies in the very early stages, what IoT technology will enable. Early treatments are usually easier, cheaper and maximize the chance for a complete cure. This is called P4 medicine — preventive, participatory, predictive, personalized. But this requires continuously measuring many parameters within our bodies. If we don’t want to live with our physician, we need to wear the necessary measurement equipment and this is where the new high-tech industry plays a role. Continue reading

Modelling Shape-memory Alloy Stents with ANSYS Mechanical

Earlier this year, I worked on the modelling and finite element analysis of biomedical stents teaming up with colleagues Jorge Dopico (ANSYS Iberia) and Mark Robinson (ANSYS UK). In particular, the focus was the development of a model that would allow for a better understanding of the “in vivo” performance of stents made of innovative shape-memory alloy materials. Continue reading

Moore’s Law Might Be Slowing Down, But Not Software Scalability

Based on last week’s announcement that ANSYS and Cray has smashed supercomputing records, an editor of a well-known magazine followed up on and asked me whether this achievement might help to compensate the slowdown of Moore’s Law. Although I was able to briefly respond, it was also end of the day and while driving home the question stayed in my head and was the origin of this blog. Continue reading

Solving the Impossible Electromagnetic Simulation with HPC

solving impossible electromagnetic simulation

I was speaking with an ANSYS HFSS developer about a year ago when he mentioned they were starting to see customers who wanted to run 3-D full wave electromagnetic field simulations that would need more than a terabyte of computer system memory, something this developer hadn’t been able to do before. Continue reading

Lightning Strikes Airplane – Clever Engineers Save the Day

Earlier this year we experienced a quite severe storm with thunder and lightning here in New Hampshire in the US. While this is not in itself unusual, it sticks in my mind because it brought a tree down on my garage. Fortunately the damage was only superficial, no one was hurt and it was repaired relatively quickly. However, since then I pay a bit more attention either during storms or when I read about the effects of them in the press.

airplane lightning strikeSo it will be of no surprise that a recent “lightning strikes airplane” headline caught my eye.

If you watch the video below, I think you will agree it is spectacular and also a little frightening, particularly if, like me, you fly extensively. Continue reading

Defense Technology and A Coat of Paint: The Difference Between Winning and Losing

Defense technology news has been awash recently with stories of the defeat of the Lockheed Martin F35 Joint Strike Fighter during a dog fight with a 40 year old fighter, the F16. Of course, such sensational stories are to be expected for an aircraft program that is under the microscope, particularly when it is alleged that the test pilot stated that the “F35 is at a distinct energy disadvantage” when it comes to maneuverability.

But just as quick was the response from the F35 team. According to the Washington Post, Pentagon officials pointed out that one of the key technologies that was missing from the F35 that was tested in the dog fight was its “special stealth coating” — or literally an extra coat of, albeit very expensive, paint. Continue reading

Monthly Healthcare Webinar: Sharing Knowledge to Innovate Faster

This is very frustrating. I have the chance to travel quite a bit and meet with numerous medical partners —academic leaders, industrial experts, thought leaders and medical device executives. Many of them are as passionate as I am about using simulation to accelerate the pace of innovation for medical device and pharmaceutical solutions. Yet, most of them are amazed when I show them some of the achievements of their peers. Some simply didn’t know that this application or model was possible to simulate or didn’t know how to do it .If all of them would share great results in their areas of expertise then everyone could learn and benefit.

This is not acceptable for an industry where our pace of innovation means better comfort, less pain or perhaps survival for the patient! Continue reading

ANSYS Student Version Released – Free Download

ANSYS student versionI have some very exciting news to share with you. Today we announced the immediate availability of the free of charge ANSYS Student product. Yes, you read that correctly! We’ve actually made our student product  version available free of charge, globally! It can be downloaded here, go and check it out!

Here’s a high level  summary of the ANSYS Student product: Continue reading