Monthly Healthcare Webinar: Sharing Knowledge to Innovate Faster

This is very frustrating. I have the chance to travel quite a bit and meet with numerous medical partners —academic leaders, industrial experts, thought leaders and medical device executives. Many of them are as passionate as I am about using simulation to accelerate the pace of innovation for medical device and pharmaceutical solutions. Yet, most of them are amazed when I show them some of the achievements of their peers. Some simply didn’t know that this application or model was possible to simulate or didn’t know how to do it .If all of them would share great results in their areas of expertise then everyone could learn and benefit.

This is not acceptable for an industry where our pace of innovation means better comfort, less pain or perhaps survival for the patient! Continue reading

AIMing for Better Biomedical Devices

Earlier this year, we introduced ANSYS AIM, the first integrated and comprehensive multiphysics simulation environment designed for all engineers. Check out Richard Clegg’s recent blog post for an overview.

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Since then, we’ve been applying AIM to a wide range of industrial applications, including the medical device industry, where AIM provides a modern, easy-to-use tool for a variety of applications. Continue reading

Entering the In Silico Era with ANSYS Advantage

“Innovation in healthcare is not just a question of business; often it is a matter of life and death. Medical and pharmaceutical companies must turn a profit, but they also have an ethical duty to improve lives — addressing common chronic illnesses and providing effective treatments for rare conditions — no matter the lack of profitability. Healthcare companies, therefore, face the dilemma of how to minimize cost and maximize efficiency.” Continue reading

Modeling the Risk of Concussion Post Super Bowl 2015

suberbowl 2015 concussionThis year’s Super Bowl and an often controversial NFL season are behind us and I’d like to congratulate the New England Patriots on the nice win. (Seattle, you put up a good fight but that was a pretty risky call at the last minute!) But, even as the win by the Pats fades, a new controversy has stirred. Seahawks defensive end Cliff Avril exited the Super Bowl in the third quarter after being diagnosed with a concussion. Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman passed a concussion test during the Super Bowl on Sunday, allowing him to continue to play, but it could have just as easily gone the other way. Continue reading

Red Wines and Your Cardiovascular System

Last weekend, I attended the major wine fair in Lille, France. Bottles of St Emilion Grand Cru Classé, Chateauneuf du Pape, St Joseph, Saumur-Champigny found their way to my cellar in preparation for the sumptuous dinners I’m planning around Christmas. Young red wines are good for cardiovascular system, whereas, an excess of good wine and good food is not a good idea for a long and healthy life. Continue reading

Getting the Right Prosthetic Hip Implant Positioning

I’ve had many conversations with customers who struggle with their reality that it can be very costly and time-consuming for manufacturers to predict the performance of medical devices. They wonder how to address these problems using modelling and simulation to help evaluate devices at an early stage of their development. Given the recent success of the Medical Device Innovation Summit, it was clear to me that there are a lot of exciting developments taking place by using ANSYS for this purpose, whether it involves orthopaedic implants, stents or other devices. Continue reading

How Bioreactors Are Keeping Cells Happy

image of mixing tank velocity surface cell bioreactor

Velocity iso-surface colored by Eddy viscosity

Cell-culture bioreactors lie at the heart of the processes used to produce large-molecule, protein-based therapeutics. In cell culture, mammalian cells are grown outside the human/plant body. These cells produce therapeutic proteins and antibodies. This is much easier said than done. In fact, cells do not cooperate much when they are grown outside the (human or plant) body. The question then is: Why is it so difficult for cells in culture to have the same physiological function in laboratory as in our body? Continue reading

In the Operating Room, It’s Not Virtual Anymore!

Two weeks ago, while visiting some partners of the ANGIOVISION project, I had the unique opportunity to be in the operating room to attend an open heart surgery. It was fascinating to see live what we have been simulating for years. The replacement of the calcified heart valve combined with some bypass is a delicate surgery that necessitates extra corporeal blood circulation. I found myself very aware of the anxiety felt by the patient’s family, as my father-in-law had a similar operation a few months ago.

Despite the complexity of the situation, I was amazed by the serenity of the surgeon moving from step-to-step with professionalism, expertise and extreme calm, taking a few seconds to show me in reality what I usually see on the screen. For sure, the most moving time was when they brought the heart back to working temperature and watching this robust pump spontaneously feeding life into the body again. Continue reading

Frontiers in Medical Devices

On September 11th to 13th, I will be traveling to Washington, DC to present at the Frontiers in Medical Devices conference which ANSYS is helping to sponsor. The FDA and ASME are co-sponsoring this event that is focused on the application of computer modeling and simulation in the biomedical industry.

Frontiers in Medical Devices conference

This conference is designed to present new research, foster discussion of the barriers to implementation of computer modeling and to promote the use of modeling for medical device applications. Conference tracks range from patient-specific to population modeling, and from novel computational methods to computational models as medical devices. Continue reading

Engineering Simulation Techniques for Biomedical R&D – Simulating Blood Flow

aortaUsing engineering simulation techniques for biomedical R&D is becoming more and more commonplace for many healthcare applications. For example, accurate description and assessment of blood flow features are crucial to understand the genesis and progression of cardiovascular diseases. While noninvasive measurement techniques have grown more advanced in resolving flow details, there are still problems with accuracy and resolution. Flow features such as wall shear stress, which depends on the velocity gradient at the arterial wall, cannot be measured with significant accuracy using today’s measurement techniques. In the Computational Biofluid Research Group at Linköping University, we are using simulation to gain a better understand of blood flow. Continue reading