Simulating Smart Medical Implants for the Medical IoT

Digital health technology is taking the healthcare industry by storm and is expected to reach $233.3 billion by 2020, driven particularly by the mobile health market. Connected medical devices and associated services offer safer and more effective healthcare through real-time monitoring of patient adherence, disease state, and procedure recovery. Examples include pill bottles that remind patients when it’s time to take a medication, watches that monitor heart rate and automated insulin pumps that monitor and respond to blood glucose levels. Each of these rely on the premise that early detection of an emerging problem enables a preemptive treatment response, maximizing the chances of successful treatment in the most cost-effective way.   Continue reading

10 Compelling Reasons to Upgrade to ANSYS 17 for Healthcare Applications

On January 27, ANSYS released its biggest version ever, ANSYS 17.0. Although the ANSYS simulation platform is renowned for its comprehensive coverage of virtually every industry through its extensive range of simulation tools, this latest release is particularly suited for the healthcare industry, whether you are modeling structural, fluid or electromagnetic applications — not to mention those of you engaged with multiphysics modeling. Among the hundreds of new features coming with this release, it might be easy to miss those which are truly important for the medical device, pharmaceutical or clinical sectors.  Let me highlight 3 new or enhanced capabilities. Continue reading

HI from ANSYS

As I am sure you know, ANSYS general-purpose CFD codes are applied across such diverse industries as off-road (construction) vehicles, alternative energy, and oil and gas. This requires us to develop software that meets the modeling needs of the world’s largest user-base of engineering simulation. Which means our code can’t be everything to everyone. That is why we provide users with the ability to incorporate their own industry-specific capabilities. This level of openness that creates the opportunity for our users to implement their own cutting edge physics. This post will talk about how general-purpose CFD tools can be customized to model blood damage in medical devices. Continue reading

In Silico Medicine: Let’s Do It … TOGETHER … NOW!

in silico simulation2015 was a fantastic year for the medical Internet of Things (Medical IoT), in silico clinical trials and personalized medicine. Many thought leaders and industry pioneers elaborated exciting visions. Leading regulatory authorities, such as the FDA, encouraged a number of innovative approaches, including the large-scale adoption of computer-based models to streamline the regulatory approval process. Continue reading

Designing a Bioreactor: Bridging the Gap

designing a bioreactor gapIn a previous blog, it was explained how simulation helps microorganisms grow well inside a bioreactor. It is of utmost important that microorganisms are healthy in order to get a high-quality therapeutic products that can make human beings healthy. While simulations can help with ensuring this, there a gap in what simulation can do and what is being actually done on field. It means that the potential of simulation can be further realized for biopharmaceutical industry. Where is the gap and how can we bridge it? Continue reading

So You Want to Design Medical Devices

Healthcare is often cited as one of the leading applications for the Internet of Things (IoT). Looking around the Web, it is clear that leading high tech companies like Qualcomm, Intel, Cisco, Juniper all have initiatives on healthcare. A notable example is Google, which has already created a prototype contact lens to help measure glucose levels in diabetic patients.

“Better patient outcome” is a goal that all of us can get behind!

But even the most successful high-tech companies are quickly discovering that designing medical devices is different than designing consumer electronics. Designing for the healthcare industry requires extra rigor, insight, and collaboration with healthcare industry experts. Continue reading

3 Things High-Tech Companies Should Consider When Entering the Healthcare Market

Head_SARBecause of the growing emphasis on the Internet of Things (IoT), a large number of analysts see the healthcare market as one of the biggest opportunities for high-tech. As a specialist in the healthcare business, I certainly agree that the next major step for healthcare requires treating pathologies in the very early stages, what IoT technology will enable. Early treatments are usually easier, cheaper and maximize the chance for a complete cure. This is called P4 medicine — preventive, participatory, predictive, personalized. But this requires continuously measuring many parameters within our bodies. If we don’t want to live with our physician, we need to wear the necessary measurement equipment and this is where the new high-tech industry plays a role. Continue reading

Modelling Shape-memory Alloy Stents with ANSYS Mechanical

Earlier this year, I worked on the modelling and finite element analysis of biomedical stents teaming up with colleagues Jorge Dopico (ANSYS Iberia) and Mark Robinson (ANSYS UK). In particular, the focus was the development of a model that would allow for a better understanding of the “in vivo” performance of stents made of innovative shape-memory alloy materials. Continue reading

Monthly Healthcare Webinar: Sharing Knowledge to Innovate Faster

This is very frustrating. I have the chance to travel quite a bit and meet with numerous medical partners —academic leaders, industrial experts, thought leaders and medical device executives. Many of them are as passionate as I am about using simulation to accelerate the pace of innovation for medical device and pharmaceutical solutions. Yet, most of them are amazed when I show them some of the achievements of their peers. Some simply didn’t know that this application or model was possible to simulate or didn’t know how to do it .If all of them would share great results in their areas of expertise then everyone could learn and benefit.

This is not acceptable for an industry where our pace of innovation means better comfort, less pain or perhaps survival for the patient! Continue reading

AIMing for Better Biomedical Devices

Earlier this year, we introduced ANSYS AIM, the first integrated and comprehensive multiphysics simulation environment designed for all engineers. Check out Richard Clegg’s recent blog post for an overview.

image001

Since then, we’ve been applying AIM to a wide range of industrial applications, including the medical device industry, where AIM provides a modern, easy-to-use tool for a variety of applications. Continue reading