So You Want to Design Medical Devices

Healthcare is often cited as one of the leading applications for the Internet of Things (IoT). Looking around the Web, it is clear that leading high tech companies like Qualcomm, Intel, Cisco, Juniper all have initiatives on healthcare. A notable example is Google, which has already created a prototype contact lens to help measure glucose levels in diabetic patients.

“Better patient outcome” is a goal that all of us can get behind!

But even the most successful high-tech companies are quickly discovering that designing medical devices is different than designing consumer electronics. Designing for the healthcare industry requires extra rigor, insight, and collaboration with healthcare industry experts. Continue reading

3 Things High-Tech Companies Should Consider When Entering the Healthcare Market

Head_SARBecause of the growing emphasis on the Internet of Things (IoT), a large number of analysts see the healthcare market as one of the biggest opportunities for high-tech. As a specialist in the healthcare business, I certainly agree that the next major step for healthcare requires treating pathologies in the very early stages, what IoT technology will enable. Early treatments are usually easier, cheaper and maximize the chance for a complete cure. This is called P4 medicine — preventive, participatory, predictive, personalized. But this requires continuously measuring many parameters within our bodies. If we don’t want to live with our physician, we need to wear the necessary measurement equipment and this is where the new high-tech industry plays a role. Continue reading

Modelling Shape-memory Alloy Stents with ANSYS Mechanical

Earlier this year, I worked on the modelling and finite element analysis of biomedical stents teaming up with colleagues Jorge Dopico (ANSYS Iberia) and Mark Robinson (ANSYS UK). In particular, the focus was the development of a model that would allow for a better understanding of the “in vivo” performance of stents made of innovative shape-memory alloy materials. Continue reading

Monthly Healthcare Webinar: Sharing Knowledge to Innovate Faster

This is very frustrating. I have the chance to travel quite a bit and meet with numerous medical partners —academic leaders, industrial experts, thought leaders and medical device executives. Many of them are as passionate as I am about using simulation to accelerate the pace of innovation for medical device and pharmaceutical solutions. Yet, most of them are amazed when I show them some of the achievements of their peers. Some simply didn’t know that this application or model was possible to simulate or didn’t know how to do it .If all of them would share great results in their areas of expertise then everyone could learn and benefit.

This is not acceptable for an industry where our pace of innovation means better comfort, less pain or perhaps survival for the patient! Continue reading

AIMing for Better Biomedical Devices

Earlier this year, we introduced ANSYS AIM, the first integrated and comprehensive multiphysics simulation environment designed for all engineers. Check out Richard Clegg’s recent blog post for an overview.


Since then, we’ve been applying AIM to a wide range of industrial applications, including the medical device industry, where AIM provides a modern, easy-to-use tool for a variety of applications. Continue reading

Entering the In Silico Era with ANSYS Advantage

“Innovation in healthcare is not just a question of business; often it is a matter of life and death. Medical and pharmaceutical companies must turn a profit, but they also have an ethical duty to improve lives — addressing common chronic illnesses and providing effective treatments for rare conditions — no matter the lack of profitability. Healthcare companies, therefore, face the dilemma of how to minimize cost and maximize efficiency.” Continue reading

Modeling the Risk of Concussion Post Super Bowl 2015

suberbowl 2015 concussionThis year’s Super Bowl and an often controversial NFL season are behind us and I’d like to congratulate the New England Patriots on the nice win. (Seattle, you put up a good fight but that was a pretty risky call at the last minute!) But, even as the win by the Pats fades, a new controversy has stirred. Seahawks defensive end Cliff Avril exited the Super Bowl in the third quarter after being diagnosed with a concussion. Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman passed a concussion test during the Super Bowl on Sunday, allowing him to continue to play, but it could have just as easily gone the other way. Continue reading

Red Wines and Your Cardiovascular System

Last weekend, I attended the major wine fair in Lille, France. Bottles of St Emilion Grand Cru Classé, Chateauneuf du Pape, St Joseph, Saumur-Champigny found their way to my cellar in preparation for the sumptuous dinners I’m planning around Christmas. Young red wines are good for cardiovascular system, whereas, an excess of good wine and good food is not a good idea for a long and healthy life. Continue reading

Getting the Right Prosthetic Hip Implant Positioning

I’ve had many conversations with customers who struggle with their reality that it can be very costly and time-consuming for manufacturers to predict the performance of medical devices. They wonder how to address these problems using modelling and simulation to help evaluate devices at an early stage of their development. Given the recent success of the Medical Device Innovation Summit, it was clear to me that there are a lot of exciting developments taking place by using ANSYS for this purpose, whether it involves orthopaedic implants, stents or other devices. Continue reading

How Bioreactors Are Keeping Cells Happy

image of mixing tank velocity surface cell bioreactor

Velocity iso-surface colored by Eddy viscosity

Cell-culture bioreactors lie at the heart of the processes used to produce large-molecule, protein-based therapeutics. In cell culture, mammalian cells are grown outside the human/plant body. These cells produce therapeutic proteins and antibodies. This is much easier said than done. In fact, cells do not cooperate much when they are grown outside the (human or plant) body. The question then is: Why is it so difficult for cells in culture to have the same physiological function in laboratory as in our body? Continue reading