How ANSYS Simulation is Helping Virginia Tech Team to Optimize Hyperloop Pod

After placing fourth at the SpaceX Hyperloop Design Weekend in January 2016, as well as the first ever Hyperloop Pod competition in Los Angeles, California, Hyperloop at Virginia Tech is working tirelessly toward improving every aspect of their pod. The Virginia Tech design team comprises over 60 people, branching out to all majors within the university, from business to aerospace engineering. We currently follow a tick-tock engineering cycle, innovating for one competition, then optimizing for the next using ANSYS Simulation. Continue reading

Driving Towards Autonomous Cars and ADAS – The Future is Now

Remote Sensing System of Vehicle. various cameras and sensors of autonomous vehicles ADASRead any automotive-related article and I’m sure it discusses autonomous cars and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS)  – the benefits, the challenges and what the future may hold. More and more auto makers are moving towards autonomous developing vehicles, but many of the systems that will eventually be integrated into these vehicles to make them fully autonomous are being developed today. In fact, you probably have some of them in the car you are driving now — Collision Mitigation Braking,  Lane Departure Warning, Blind Spot Warning, and Lane Keeping Assistance to name a few. These ADAS applications present a new set of challenges and require a multi-disciplinary development approach. You can read more about these development areas in a blog written by my colleague, Sandeep Sovani.

Continue reading

Optimizing Critical Components to Fit into Confined Spaces Using the Adjoint Solver

Optimizing components that must fit into tight spaces can be a daunting task, even for the most experienced designer. Consider the HVAC system of a car, which supplies air to the vehicle’s cabin. Today, air conditioning is deemed standard equipment even in entry-level automobiles, so manufacturers must build it in. Its critical components – manifold ductwork — are located under the hood amid the well-planned jumble of engine, radiator, battery, transmission, and auxiliary structures. Not much room in there … and that’s just one of the complications. Continue reading

Design Automation Conference and LiveWorx – Big on IoT and Machine Learning

In June, I attended the Design Automation Conference in Austin, TX and LiveWorx in Boston, MA.  I would like to share some key observations from both events.

  1. The Internet of Things is going to be big; very big!
  2. Success requires partnerships.
  3. IoT is about monetizing data.
  4. Engineering simulation is essential.

The Internet of Things is going to be big!

At the just concluded Design Automation Conference in Austin, speaker after speaker stressed this.

Silicon Labs CEO, Tyson Tuttle, noted that there will be 70 billion Internet connected devices by 2025 with accompanying semiconductors to power them. He repeated McKinsey’s forecast the the Internet of Things will drive between $4 -11 trillion in global economic impact by 2025. Continue reading

How HPC Reduces CFD Simulation Time from Weeks to One Day

Some records are broken for glory, while others, like HPC, have more practical results. Compare 2017 Nathan’s Famous International Hot Dog Eating Contest champion Joey Chestnut’s record-breaking feat of eating 72 hot dogs (with buns) in 10 minutes during the annual July 4 contest to ANSYS, Saudi Aramco and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) shattering the supercomputing record by more than 5x. Chestnut was awarded the “Mustard Belt” for the 10th time, $10,000 and an additional 20,000+ calories for his impressive performance. By leveraging high performance computing, Saudi Aramco and KAUST worked with ANSYS to speed up a complex simulation of a separation vessel from several weeks to an overnight run! Continue reading

Optimizing Tunnel Ventilation Fan Blades for Energy Efficiency Using the Adjoint Solver

Because fossil fuel resources around the globe are finite, an overriding engineering design challenge is energy efficiency and sustainability. Today I’ll use tunnel ventilation fans as an example to illustrate how CFD simulation and advancements in our Adjoint Solver in ANSYS 18 can optimize fan blades performance.

According to a report by Mosen Ltd., a leader in this industry, the “greening” of tunnel ventilation is still in its infancy. The application consumes substantial power, sometimes several megawatts; in addition, governmental regulations often require tunnels beyond a certain length (for example, 300 meters) to have ventilation systems that disperse exhaust and control smoke in case of fire. As a result, tunnels need more ventilation capacity than what would be needed for day-to-day air quality. Continue reading

3 Ways to Boost ANSYS Performance with Intel Technologies

Intel Supercomputing 2017

ISC 2017 in Frankfurt, Germany (copyright Philip Loeper)

My visit to ISC High Performance last month in Frankfurt, Germany re-affirmed my belief that computing innovation shows no signs of slowing down. I participated in an industrial HPC user panel at the event, which has traditionally focused on big supercomputing solutions for government and research institutions. The fact that this year’s ISC broke attendance records and dedicated so much time to industry sessions shows how much HPC has become entrenched in other industries.

We have been working with Intel on a few innovations that I wasn’t at liberty to discuss at ISC, but can now share with you that Intel announced its new processors and improvements to their accompanying technologies yesterday. We have been working with Intel to benchmark ANSYS software on the new technologies before their release, so that our mutual customers can immediately see what benefits they’ll receive. Here’s a sneak peek at the results. Continue reading

Onewheel: A Turbocharged Skateboard Powered by ANSYS

Most people occasionally have dreams of flying — without the aid of an airplane or other mechanical device — just soaring through the air on their own power. The thrill ends with dream, unfortunately. Closer down to earth, many of us enjoy the feeling of gliding effortlessly across the snow on skis or a snowboard, over the ice on skates, or on a surfboard cutting through the water. There is something about the effortless gliding sensation that can’t be approached by the more mundane act of walking — though walking has its pleasures too.

Onewheel skateboard

Continue reading

Why Startups and New Players are Driving Innovation in the Space 2.0 Arena

With a clear mission in mind, huge government funding and thousands of talented scientists, the early pioneers of space exploration were disrupting innovators, able to achieve what many thought impossible. Then organizations grew in size, and projects and goals multiplied while public funding was often in doubt. Despite other significant success, this led to a slowdown in the innovation pace. Now, another wave of innovators has come: Space 2.0 players.

With no history, no legacy of tools and processes and no constraints in workflow design, they were able in a few years to attract huge private funds and challenge the leadership of the big established players.

Both the old players and the newcomers rely on simulation, but I see a big difference in the results they get in terms of efficiency, costs and innovation pace. The secret is in how they implement it. Continue reading

UC Motorsports Wins the Dynamic Event with ANSYS CFD

Each year the University of Canterbury Motorsport (UCM) team in New Zealand pushes the boundaries of what can be achieved in racing; in 2016 they overcame their greatest challenge to date. After three years (2013-2015) of competing in the Australasian Formula SAE competition with an internal combustion engine vehicle , the team decided in 2016 to design and build New Zealand’s very first four-wheel drive (4WD) electric vehicle for the competition. The results were remarkable: UCM made history by becoming the first team with an electric vehicle to win a dynamic event at the Australasian Formula SAE competition.
Continue reading