Onewheel: A Turbocharged Skateboard Powered by ANSYS

Most people occasionally have dreams of flying — without the aid of an airplane or other mechanical device — just soaring through the air on their own power. The thrill ends with dream, unfortunately. Closer down to earth, many of us enjoy the feeling of gliding effortlessly across the snow on skis or a snowboard, over the ice on skates, or on a surfboard cutting through the water. There is something about the effortless gliding sensation that can’t be approached by the more mundane act of walking — though walking has its pleasures too.

Onewheel skateboard

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Emirates Team New Zealand Wins the 2017 America’s Cup

From all of us at ANSYS, we want to congratulate the team of Emirates Team New Zealand who just won the 2017 America’s Cup. Wining the America’s Cup is a feat in sailsmanship, a feat in teamwork, but also a feat in engineering.

What I love during the America’s Cup season is that all of my colleagues and friends ask me about the competition as if I was an expert (Hint: as you can see on the picture, I am a more of a Sunday sailor than a high tech boat skipper). What I can talk about, however, is some of the technology behind the amazing boats that compete in the America’s Cup. Continue reading

3-D Design Helps Pool Cleaning, Accessibility Go Swimmingly

What comes to mind when you think of public swimming pools?  A refreshing escape from the summer heat? Children playing and swimming? Free-swimmers, divers, and water polo players jockeying for limited space? How 3-D design makes pools cleaner and more accessible for everyone? Hmm. I may need to explain that last one.

While many of us focus on the positive aspects, there are some of us who avoid public pools: non-swimmers, of course; people concerned about bacteria and other health issues; and people with reduced mobility (PMR) who find accessing public pools difficult to manage and unwelcoming.

Hexagone, a French company founded in 1987, has made its mission to serve these last two categories of recreationists, designing and equipping public pools with professional high-tech cleaning devices and creating solutions that increase PMR accessibility and safety. Continue reading

Technologia et Circenses et ANSYS Sports

Running with determinationIn just a few days, millions of eyes will be on the biggest sporting event of the summer. This upcoming major international multi-sport event is due to take place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from August 5th to the 21st. For those of us participating in sport or simply keen to watch these events, I think this will be a fantastic firework of performances, achievements and discoveries of sports that we barely know but that we might be watching with great interest. Continue reading

Should They Ban Motorcycles from Cycling Races?

The former Belgian top cyclist Johan Museeuw once stated: “Crashing is part of cycling as crying is part of love.” Indeed, probably every elite cyclist has experienced in-race crashes that put him or her in the hospital. But recently, things seem to have become much worse. In the past two years, many prestigious elite races have been stained by serious crashes between riders and in-race motorcycles. The tragic culmination so far of these crashes was reached on 27 March 2016, when Belgian rider Antoine Demoitié got hit by a motorcycle in the race Gent-Wevelgem and died later in hospital due to his injuries. Later, on 28 May 2016, 19 cyclists were involved in a major crash with two motorcycles, which put Belgian rider Stig Broeckx in hospital in a coma. Continue reading

Zyz Sailing Team Designs Using ANSYS

Zys sailing teamZyz sailing team started designing and manufacturing small sailing boats in 2008 to participate to Italian inter-university regattas called 1001velaCUP. During the first eight-year experience of the team, different boats have been launched, trying to optimize all different aspects that influence the final performance of a boat. R3 class rule adopted in this competition imposes geometrical and structural constrains to the design process: maximum length x beam of the boat is 4,60 x 2,10 m, while a minimum percentage weight for the hull constituted by 70% of plant-origin material is imposed. Continue reading

Feather or Synthetic Shuttlecock Design to Win the Game?

Every Friday night, I’m playing badminton with a few friends in my village of Perwez in Belgium. Beyond the motivation of staying fit and healthy while having good time, I’m also pushed by the strong desire to defeat my friend and colleague Michel Rochette from our Lyon office. Occasionally, we are organizing international games to challenge each other and so far, the results are very tight. But I now have a winning strategy!  Continue reading

Could a Car Following a Cyclist Determine the Tour de France Outcome?

This Sunday one of the most popular sporting events for tens of million people around the world begins. The Tour de France starts in Utrecht, the Netherlands. We will again see the world’s best top athletes fighting for the stage victory every day. We’ll admire them as they climb the steepest slope at an amazing speed and be impressed to see them completing a time trial at an average speed above 50 km/h. Throughout the past years, the regulations have continuously improved to guarantee a clean and fair race. As an example, during time trials, neither cars nor motorbikes are allowed in front of the cyclists as this would obviously reduce air resistance. Similarly, if a cyclist is catching up to the one ahead, they must stay on different sides of the road. However, there is no regulation to prevent a vehicle from following the athlete as it is commonly believed that a car riding behind a cyclist cannot influence him.

But is this really true?

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Modeling the Risk of Concussion Post Super Bowl 2015

suberbowl 2015 concussionThis year’s Super Bowl and an often controversial NFL season are behind us and I’d like to congratulate the New England Patriots on the nice win. (Seattle, you put up a good fight but that was a pretty risky call at the last minute!) But, even as the win by the Pats fades, a new controversy has stirred. Seahawks defensive end Cliff Avril exited the Super Bowl in the third quarter after being diagnosed with a concussion. Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman passed a concussion test during the Super Bowl on Sunday, allowing him to continue to play, but it could have just as easily gone the other way. Continue reading

Superbowl DeflateGate Scandal Debunked Using Engineering Simulation

You can’t turn on the news without hearing about the latest scandal to hit the sports industry. The New England Patriots — the National Football League (NFL) team that faces the defending champ Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLIX this Sunday — are under pressure (pun intended) for using under-inflated footballs when they routed the Indianapolis Colts in the recent AFC championship that decided who would go on to the Super Bowl. One of the theories around DeflateGate is that a softer, less inflated ball will deform more when grasped, making it easier to hold. This could make for a more consistent pass, or a softer catch.

So, as simulation experts, what can we add to the national dialogue? Good question! Continue reading