10 Reasons to be Excited About ANSYS 17.0 for Turbomachinery Simulation

For the past few weeks, the ANSYS blog has published many posts and ANSYS has held a number of webinars describing the advantages that ANSYS 17.0 provides for turbomachinery simulation. In the following, I will review these events and provide my summary of 10 (out of many more) exciting developments:

  1. A focus on HPC delivers significant speedups and ability to handle larger models, for both CFD and mechanical simulation.
  2. A new mechanical model simulates journal bearings, additionally providing important inputs of stiffness and damping for rotordynamics simulation.
  3. Fracture analysis is faster and easier with arbitrary crack surface definition and post-processing.

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Coupling ANSYS and ADT Tools Speeds Turbomachinery Design

Engineers like to have lots of tools at their disposal. In my home workshop I have a lot of them, but it seems that there is always something extra that I could use for one particular job or another. Having the right tool for that job, and one of high quality that will not break in the middle of a project, is valuable as well. And organization is a good thing too, because if you can’t find tools when you need them and are unable to use them in conjunction with other tools, then the job does not progress very well. Having my toolkit in order is beneficial when the unexpected happens or if I need to complete a job in short order. Continue reading

Pump Simulation Advances with ANSYS 17.0

Pumps are pervasive and play an important role across many industries and in our daily lives. They have been around for a long time, when you consider that the Archimedes screw dates back over two thousand years. They come in a wide range of sizes and styles, from heart pumps that measure only millimeters in size to large pump-turbines that measure meters in diameter. Some pumps are custom- engineered and very high-tech, such as those used for liquid rocket propulsion, nuclear submarines or power plant applications. Many others are regarded as a commodity items, although that view is changing, as we shall see. Some estimate that pumps consume as much as 10% of the electricity generated worldwide. Continue reading

Aeromechanics and Performance Simulation for Turbomachinery

Prediction of blade row performance and aeromechanics is important to turbomachinery development because turbomachinery blading lies at the heart of all types of turbomachines: pumps, fans, compressors, turbines etc. Improving the aerodynamic (or hydrodynamic) and structural aspects of the blading is essential to meeting modern requirements for performance and durability. If we consider that the fluid mechanics primarily influences performance, including fuel efficiency, then the structural mechanics is more responsible for durability. But of course, the two are closely related, and that is particularly true as the operating temperature increases, as in the hot section of modern gas turbines. Most end users do not want to sacrifice durability for energy efficiency, but rather demand both. Continue reading

Turbomachinery Simulation Productivity Advances in ANSYS 17.0

Turbomachinery designers are under pressure to improve all aspects of turbomachinery performance. That applies not only to aircraft engine developers, who sometimes seem to garner the most attention in the news, but to designers of most other machine types as well. While fuel burn and efficiency targets are most often discussed, these targets must be balanced with a number of other competing and often opposing considerations, such as operating range, reliability, cost, time to market, etc.

Engineering simulation now plays a key role in turbomachinery development. This has come about because of significant improvements in engineering software and computing speed. Many turbomachinery companies were early adopters of simulation; they played a significant role in shaping software development to their needs and validating it for their applications. Experiment and testing still play an important role, but often only when a design is sufficiently evolved, or in situations where fundamental information is missing. So simulation and testing complement one another. Continue reading

Automated Design System Speeds Pump Development

Advanced simulation tools are essential for contemporary and competitive product design. But it is the assembly of these tools into an effective, automated design system that gives leading companies an additional advantage. One such company is Denmark-based Grundfos, one of the world’s leading pump manufacturers.
P_FEA_model

Grundfos estimates that pumps currently account for 10 percent of the world’s total electricity consumption. This fact provides ample incentive to improve pump efficiency, given the current drive for energy efficiency and reduction in carbon emissions. Grundfos produces pumps for a wide range of applications: circulator pumps for the heating, ventilating and air conditioning industry as well as pumps for water supply, sewage, boiler, and other industrial applications and for inclusion in the equipment of other OEM’s. With such a broad line of products, it is clear that there is plenty of potential for putting an automated design loop system to work. Continue reading

Simulation Speeds Innovation for Pump and Turbine Company

Gilkes Cooling pumps

Cooling pumps Courtesy Gilkes

On November 3rd, as part of the ANSYS Convergence webinar series, we will presenting an interesting story on how simulation has enabled a well-established company to move rapidly along the innovation curve. That company is Gilbert, Gilkes & Gordon Ltd., aka Gilkes. The company has successfully operated for over 150 years in the Lakes District of the United Kingdom. Their main products are small hydropower systems for generating electricity, and pumps for circulating cooling water in diesel engines. Continue reading

5 Improved Workflows for Rotating Machinery Design and Analysis

There were a number of new and exciting workflow enhancements included in ANSYS 16.0 for those who design and analyze rotating machinery to make data transfers and simulation setup easier. Here are the top five enhancements:

1 – BladeGen to BladeEditor

BladeGen Continue reading

ASME Turbo Expo in its 60th year

2015 is a special anniversary year for ASME Turbo Expo: its 60th. This year the annual conference will be held June 15-19 in Montréal Canada, at the Palais des Congrès de Montréal. As in previous years,ASME Turbo Expo ASME Turbo Expo is the premier event on the international turbomachinery calendar. Besides gas turbine related sessions there are a host of others covering steam and wind turbines, compressors, turbochargers, fans and blowers, to name a few. Continue reading

Blade Row Flow Modeling in ANSYS 16.0

As you have probably heard, in January of this year, ANSYS 16.0 was released with a full set of new features and exciting enhancements covering our entire simulation portfolio (see more here). But in this blog, I would like to tell you a little more about turbomachinery blade row flow modeling capability in ANSYS 16.0.

Transient blade row (TBR) simulation is an important analysis and design tool, enabling turbomachinery designers to reliably improve the performance and predict the durability of rotating machinery. Traditional  transient simulation methods are expensive since it requires simulation of all blades in the full 360 degrees  to accurately account for the pitch difference between adjacent blade rows. However, ANSYS CFX pitch-change methods resolve this challenge by providing time accurate  unsteady turbomachinery flow simulations on just a small sector of the machine annulus (typically simulating only one or a few blades, a reduced blade row model), thus tremendously reducing computing cost resources and and reducing the overall time to obtain the simulation. Continue reading