ASME Turbo Expo in its 60th year

2015 is a special anniversary year for ASME Turbo Expo: its 60th. This year the annual conference will be held June 15-19 in Montréal Canada, at the Palais des Congrès de Montréal. As in previous years,ASME Turbo Expo ASME Turbo Expo is the premier event on the international turbomachinery calendar. Besides gas turbine related sessions there are a host of others covering steam and wind turbines, compressors, turbochargers, fans and blowers, to name a few. Continue reading

Blade Row Flow Modeling in ANSYS 16.0

As you have probably heard, in January of this year, ANSYS 16.0 was released with a full set of new features and exciting enhancements covering our entire simulation portfolio (see more here). But in this blog, I would like to tell you a little more about turbomachinery blade row flow modeling capability in ANSYS 16.0.

Transient blade row (TBR) simulation is an important analysis and design tool, enabling turbomachinery designers to reliably improve the performance and predict the durability of rotating machinery. Traditional  transient simulation methods are expensive since it requires simulation of all blades in the full 360 degrees  to accurately account for the pitch difference between adjacent blade rows. However, ANSYS CFX pitch-change methods resolve this challenge by providing time accurate  unsteady turbomachinery flow simulations on just a small sector of the machine annulus (typically simulating only one or a few blades, a reduced blade row model), thus tremendously reducing computing cost resources and and reducing the overall time to obtain the simulation. Continue reading

5 Improved Workflows for Rotating Machinery Design and Analysis

There have been a number of new and exciting workflow enhancements included in ANSYS 16.0 for those who design and analyze rotating machinery to make data transfers and simulation setup easier. Here are the top five enhancements:

1) BladeGen to BladeEditor

In ANSYS 16.0, it is now possible to load BladeGen data into BladeEditor in Workbench. Users could always link BladeGen to BladeEditor (i.e ImportBGD function) in Workbench, but to perform a LoadBGD command, it was required to go into BladeEditor and find the BladeGen file to load manually. With the Create New > Geometry feature from the BladeGen (right click menu shown below) this process is much easier now. Continue reading

Developing Comprehensive Turbomachinery Simulation Solutions

I have always been fascinated by turbomachinery: pumps, compressors, turbochargers, state-of-the-art aircraft engines etc. Anything that spins is of interest. This is one of the key reasons why I love going to work at ANSYS every day. I can contribute to creating the best turbomachinery simulation solutions.

Demonstration simulation of the turbine side of a turbocharger, using a geometry design provided by our partner PCA Engineering.

Demonstration simulation of the turbine side of a turbocharger, using a geometry design provided by our partner PCA Engineering.

I am often asked “What are you working on? Turbines? Compressors? Hydraulic turbines?” Well, the answer is all of the above, and more. This is because our physics solutions are not limited by machine type, material or flow regime. Similarly, our turbomachinery-specific pre- and post-processing tools apply across machine categories. Besides, complex machines such as an aircraft engine have many parts: compressor, turbine, combustion chamber, complex secondary flow channels, etc. So with each new release of ANSYS, we strive to improve the simulation solutions that we provide to our turbomachinery customers.

Continue reading

Designing Superior Turbomachinery Products

fan blades turbomachineryRotating machinery (or turbomachinery) is an application area that spans many industry segments. Each of these significantly influences the performance and efficiency of the entire system. Rotating machinery also covers a range of different scales from very large hydraulic turbines (10m diameter runner), steam and gas turbines to small automotive turbochargers that can fit roughly in the palm of our hand. Improving the performance of rotating machinery has long been realized as a crucial factor in the success of the system as a whole. Continue reading

Turbomachinery and Pump Symposia: Industry Consolidation

Industry consolidation was one topic of discussion as my colleague-in-turbomachinery Bill Holmes and I and recently returned from the Turbomachinery & Pump Symposia. The event is organized by the Texas A&M University Turbomachinery Laboratory and held at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston Texas. Only a few years back the pump and turbomachinery shows were separate. With the amalgamation one is now able to view a large array of impressive hardware and attend informative technical sessions applicable to the full range of equipment: pumps, compressors, turbines, fan, blowers and all related components and services. The emphasis is on Oil & Gas machinery, although not exclusively as there are synergies with power generation, chemical process, air separation etc. Continue reading

ASME Turbo Expo 2014 Almost Here

ASME Turbo Expo 2014 is nearly ready to get under way. This year’s conference and trade show is being held at the CCD Congress Center in Düsseldorf, Germany, June 16 – 20. ASME Turbo Expo is the premier international event for gas turbines (on land, sea or air) and the scope has increased considerably in recent years to include steam and wind turbines, compressors, turbochargers, fans and blowers as well as cycles: solar brayton, rankine and supercritical CO2. Continue reading

Efficient Modeling of Fan Inlet Distortion

At ANSYS, we are continually improving our turbomachinery simulation capabilities. Some recent improvements are proving useful to engine manufacturers, enabling them to better understand the on-wing performance of their new fuel-efficient engines.

Fans in modern aircraft engines are very important in that they provide most of the thrust required by the aircraft. Their environment is very challenging though as they are frequently subjected to non-uniform inflow conditions. These conditions could be either due to flight operating requirements such as take-off and landing, the engine nacelle installation configuration, wake interference from aircraft fuselage or cross-flow wind conditions. Similarly, industrial land-based gas turbines in power plants can be subjected to inlet flow distortion due to upstream ducting or installation maintenance deterioration. Continue reading

Reliable Turbomachinery Blade Development

Our Tech Tips for reliable turbomachinery blade development looks a little different this month because (unbeknownst to me) our IT department is moving some equipment this weekend, and well, I didn’t want you to miss out, so we’re cross-publishing this one on turbomachinery here on the blog!

Turbomachinery Blade Development with Aero-Mechanical Simulation

Engineers need advanced simulation tools to enable them to meet customer demands for more-efficient and reliable high-performance machines. Engineers must accurately predict aerodynamic performance across an increasingly wide range of speeds and operating conditions, and they also must guarantee reliability in the design. For example, they need to ensure that blade vibration will be damped across the operating range and that cyclic unsteady loading will not impact design life.  Continue reading

Turbomachinery, Vibration, and High-Cycle Fatigue

stress in a bladed disk

Stress in a bladed disk

Turbomachinery — turbochargers, compressors, jet engines, gas turbines, pumps, etc.— are subjected to some of the harshest environments for an engineered product. High rotational velocities and extreme temperatures and pressures produce high static stresses. Couple on top of that the vibrations encountered due to the fluctuating and turbulent flow field, rotating turbomachinery components are primed for high-cycle fatigue (HCF) failures.

Traditionally, cyclic modal analyses are used to extract the vibrational modes and the appropriate modes from Campbell and interference diagram assessments are scaled based on past test data to arrive at estimates of the vibratory stresses for a fatigue analysis. Continue reading