Designing Superior Turbomachinery Products

fan blades turbomachineryRotating machinery (or turbomachinery) is an application area that spans many industry segments. Each of these significantly influences the performance and efficiency of the entire system. Rotating machinery also covers a range of different scales from very large hydraulic turbines (10m diameter runner), steam and gas turbines to small automotive turbochargers that can fit roughly in the palm of our hand. Improving the performance of rotating machinery has long been realized as a crucial factor in the success of the system as a whole. Continue reading

Turbomachinery and Pump Symposia: Industry Consolidation

Industry consolidation was one topic of discussion as my colleague-in-turbomachinery Bill Holmes and I and recently returned from the Turbomachinery & Pump Symposia. The event is organized by the Texas A&M University Turbomachinery Laboratory and held at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston Texas. Only a few years back the pump and turbomachinery shows were separate. With the amalgamation one is now able to view a large array of impressive hardware and attend informative technical sessions applicable to the full range of equipment: pumps, compressors, turbines, fan, blowers and all related components and services. The emphasis is on Oil & Gas machinery, although not exclusively as there are synergies with power generation, chemical process, air separation etc. Continue reading

ASME Turbo Expo 2014 Almost Here

ASME Turbo Expo 2014 is nearly ready to get under way. This year’s conference and trade show is being held at the CCD Congress Center in Düsseldorf, Germany, June 16 – 20. ASME Turbo Expo is the premier international event for gas turbines (on land, sea or air) and the scope has increased considerably in recent years to include steam and wind turbines, compressors, turbochargers, fans and blowers as well as cycles: solar brayton, rankine and supercritical CO2. Continue reading

Efficient Modeling of Fan Inlet Distortion

At ANSYS, we are continually improving our turbomachinery simulation capabilities. Some recent improvements are proving useful to engine manufacturers, enabling them to better understand the on-wing performance of their new fuel-efficient engines.

Fans in modern aircraft engines are very important in that they provide most of the thrust required by the aircraft. Their environment is very challenging though as they are frequently subjected to non-uniform inflow conditions. These conditions could be either due to flight operating requirements such as take-off and landing, the engine nacelle installation configuration, wake interference from aircraft fuselage or cross-flow wind conditions. Similarly, industrial land-based gas turbines in power plants can be subjected to inlet flow distortion due to upstream ducting or installation maintenance deterioration. Continue reading

Reliable Turbomachinery Blade Development

Our Tech Tips for reliable turbomachinery blade development looks a little different this month because (unbeknownst to me) our IT department is moving some equipment this weekend, and well, I didn’t want you to miss out, so we’re cross-publishing this one on turbomachinery here on the blog!

Turbomachinery Blade Development with Aero-Mechanical Simulation

Engineers need advanced simulation tools to enable them to meet customer demands for more-efficient and reliable high-performance machines. Engineers must accurately predict aerodynamic performance across an increasingly wide range of speeds and operating conditions, and they also must guarantee reliability in the design. For example, they need to ensure that blade vibration will be damped across the operating range and that cyclic unsteady loading will not impact design life.  Continue reading

Turbomachinery, Vibration, and High-Cycle Fatigue

stress in a bladed disk

Stress in a bladed disk

Turbomachinery — turbochargers, compressors, jet engines, gas turbines, pumps, etc.— are subjected to some of the harshest environments for an engineered product. High rotational velocities and extreme temperatures and pressures produce high static stresses. Couple on top of that the vibrations encountered due to the fluctuating and turbulent flow field, rotating turbomachinery components are primed for high-cycle fatigue (HCF) failures.

Traditionally, cyclic modal analyses are used to extract the vibrational modes and the appropriate modes from Campbell and interference diagram assessments are scaled based on past test data to arrive at estimates of the vibratory stresses for a fatigue analysis. Continue reading

Turbomachinery Featured in New ANSYS Advantage

AA-V7-I3-ANSYS-Advantage-Turbomachinery ANSYS Advantage Volume VII Issue 3 is now available, and I am pleased to announce that the spotlight is on my area, turbomachinery (some call it rotating machinery). My industry colleagues at ANSYS and I contributed several overview articles that, I hope, explain the work we are doing to empower developers to design and build better, more energy efficient turbomachinery.

Of great interest to me are the customer contributions — for a number of reasons, including historical ones. I have worked in the business for so many years, and it is really gratifying to see how far the software and customers’ applications have advanced. The positive impact on new machinery development is amazing as well. Continue reading

Centrifugal Compressor Design -There’s an App for That!

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PCA Engineers (www.pcaeng.co.uk) is offering a free Vista CCD app for Android phones. Last year PCA made Vista CCD available as an app for iPhones. Of course, this is the same Vista CCD that is part of the ANSYS BladeModeler toolset used in centrifugal compressor design .

Recently, I talked with Chris Robinson from PCA to find out more about the motivation for making Vista CCD into a mobile app — as well as to find out how much interest it has garnered. Continue reading