Reshaping the Future of CFD Using Mesh Morphing

A cool title, isn’t it? Hello ANSYS blog readers! This is my first time in this blog as a guest blogger. You will notice a brief resume of mine together my photo as the author of this post, but let me introduce myself so that you can understand why I am here writing about mesh morphing to the ANSYS audience.

I am a Professor at University of Rome, with good experience in fluid structure interaction (FSI) and Fluent customization using UDF programming. Five years ago, driven by a Formula 1 Top Team, I developed a powerful mesh morphing tool crafted by tough specifications. Managing any kind of mesh, precise, fast and parallel! Nothing at that time was able to do this kind of job. We tried to go with (RBFs) Radial Basis Functions mesh morphing, one of the most promising techniques. And we made it. Continue reading

How Can You Get More From An Oil Pump?

Imagine you have an oil pump in your car that has its outlet blocked. The pump is trying to throw the oil out but since the outlet is blocked the pressure in the pump keeps increasing. The excessive pressure that develops in the pump can be catastrophic to its strength and therefore life. This is precisely what happens when you try to operate the pump under extreme cold conditions, when the viscosity of the lubricant increases so much that the pump almost behaves as if its outlet has been blocked.

pumpsThis is a very common design scenario for pump manufacturers. Estimation of what is called as “shut-off” pressure and its implications on the structural integrity of the pump are key concepts that every pump manufacturer should bear in mind while designing pumps. Interestingly, simulations today allow manufacturers to develop deep understanding of such phenomenon and help them to design pumps, that perhaps they could not have, with just physical testing and prototyping. Continue reading

Optimizing Auto Combustion Using Predictive Simulation Technologies

Spray-droplet visualization at the start of injection for a Diesel sector-mesh simulation

Spray-droplet visualization at the start of injection for a diesel sector-mesh simulation

Today’s automotive community is increasingly called upon to think strategically and form unique relationships that expand its reach in a new era of cross-industry collaboration. We’re eager to share our excitement about Reaction Design’s new role at ANSYS (especially as it applies to developing optimal auto combustion processes) and reveal our shared vision for our more powerful and predictive simulation technologies.

We’re looking forward to telling you about it at the upcoming SAE 2014 World Congress and Exhibition, being held April 8 through 10 at Detroit’s Cobo Center. A must-attend for the automotive engineering community, this event represents an unparalleled opportunity to explore new technology through both technical sessions and the Innovators Only Exhibition. Continue reading

Workbench CAD Readers for ANSYS ICEM CFD Meshing

ANSYS ICEM CFD has been using the Workbench CAD readers for a few years now, and for those of you using ICEM CFD in Workbench, it is drag and drop simple. But many of our stand alone ANSYS ICEM CFD users are not really aware of this functionality, so here is a blog about it.

ANSYS ICEM CFD import

In previous versions, we had the Workbench readers under “File => Workbench Readers”. The Workbench readers really supersede the old ANSYS ICEM CFD readers. They are up-to-date, easy to use, and offer connections such as JT Open and SpaceClaim that ICEM CFD never supported on its own. Talking to users, we found that many thought the Workbench readers option would only work inside Workbench or if they installed Workbench. To make the option more obvious, we moved the Workbench readers to the top of the list and renamed it “Import Model.”

Why “Import Model” instead of “Import Geometry”? Because the Workbench readers also support mesh formats! You can even select a *.wbpj and get both the geometry and mesh. During the import process, you can filter to make it easier to find the files that you are looking for. For instance, you can switch it to SpaceClaim to filter for SpaceClaim documents. Select your particular file (some formats will show you a preview of it), and click Open. Continue reading

HFSS 3-D Layout and the Phi Mesher

ANSYS HFSS has been the mainstay, gold-standard electromagnetic simulation technology for many years. There are many key pieces to its reliable technology — such as hierarchical vector basis functions for robust solutions to Maxwell’s equations, two-dimensional port solving technology, the trans-finite element method for fast extraction of s-parameter models, state-of-the-art fast and scalable matrix solving technology, and its flexible and easy-to-use parametric interfaces.

Recently, we introduced significant breakthroughs, many in the high-performance computing (HPC) area of HFSS, such as: the domain decomposition method (DDM); HFSS-IE a 3-D method-of-moment solver that includes ACA fast-solving technology as well as a physical optics solver;and hybrid solving that combines DDM and HFSS-IE and provides the ability to rigorously solve large-scale complex electromagnetic problems with a combination of finite elements and method of moments. Continue reading

ACT Templates for ANSYS DesignXplorer

Application Customization Templates - ACT

Are you familiar with ANSYS ACT (Application Customization Templates)? ACT allows all sorts of great customization. You could use ACT to encapsulate APDL scripts, add new loads and boundary conditions, create custom results, or even integrate third party tools. For instance, Vanderplaats R&D  just integrated their topology optimization product into ANSYS Mechancial via ACT.

The ACT Toolkit requires a license to develop extensions, but not to use extensions created by others or provided in our ACT library. Continue reading

ANSYS EKM – Defining Templates for Job Submission

In two previous blogs, Batch Computations and Remote Visualization, we have been introducing ANSYS EKM 15.0 and its new capabilities of creating and managing batch jobs, as well as remote visualization sessions. These web-based capabilities are easing the process of accessing compute resources in various ways. In one specific advantage, through system configuration, the users are provided pre-defined options and parameters, such that the resulting command line is always syntactically correct and aligned with the given IT policies. Continue reading

New DPM (Discrete Phase Model) Features in ANSYS Fluent 15.0

temperature distribution ansys fluent 15With the release of ANSYS Fluent 15.0 there were many enhancements and new features that I think make the software even more productive. Fluent users who routinely use the Lagrangian tracking model (also known as DPM) will find some features that make the simulation more robust and quick to converge along with many post-processing options. I have compiled a list of some of these options for you to try. Continue reading