Reshaping the Future of CFD Using Mesh Morphing

A cool title, isn’t it? Hello ANSYS blog readers! This is my first time in this blog as a guest blogger. You will notice a brief resume of mine together my photo as the author of this post, but let me introduce myself so that you can understand why I am here writing about mesh morphing to the ANSYS audience.

I am a Professor at University of Rome, with good experience in fluid structure interaction (FSI) and Fluent customization using UDF programming. Five years ago, driven by a Formula 1 Top Team, I developed a powerful mesh morphing tool crafted by tough specifications. Managing any kind of mesh, precise, fast and parallel! Nothing at that time was able to do this kind of job. We tried to go with (RBFs) Radial Basis Functions mesh morphing, one of the most promising techniques. And we made it. Continue reading

How Can You Get More From An Oil Pump?

Imagine you have an oil pump in your car that has its outlet blocked. The pump is trying to throw the oil out but since the outlet is blocked the pressure in the pump keeps increasing. The excessive pressure that develops in the pump can be catastrophic to its strength and therefore life. This is precisely what happens when you try to operate the pump under extreme cold conditions, when the viscosity of the lubricant increases so much that the pump almost behaves as if its outlet has been blocked.

pumpsThis is a very common design scenario for pump manufacturers. Estimation of what is called as “shut-off” pressure and its implications on the structural integrity of the pump are key concepts that every pump manufacturer should bear in mind while designing pumps. Interestingly, simulations today allow manufacturers to develop deep understanding of such phenomenon and help them to design pumps, that perhaps they could not have, with just physical testing and prototyping. Continue reading

Optimizing Auto Combustion Using Predictive Simulation Technologies

Spray-droplet visualization at the start of injection for a Diesel sector-mesh simulation

Spray-droplet visualization at the start of injection for a diesel sector-mesh simulation

Today’s automotive community is increasingly called upon to think strategically and form unique relationships that expand its reach in a new era of cross-industry collaboration. We’re eager to share our excitement about Reaction Design’s new role at ANSYS (especially as it applies to developing optimal auto combustion processes) and reveal our shared vision for our more powerful and predictive simulation technologies.

We’re looking forward to telling you about it at the upcoming SAE 2014 World Congress and Exhibition, being held April 8 through 10 at Detroit’s Cobo Center. A must-attend for the automotive engineering community, this event represents an unparalleled opportunity to explore new technology through both technical sessions and the Innovators Only Exhibition. Continue reading

Workbench CAD Readers for ANSYS ICEM CFD Meshing

ANSYS ICEM CFD has been using the Workbench CAD readers for a few years now, and for those of you using ICEM CFD in Workbench, it is drag and drop simple. But many of our stand alone ANSYS ICEM CFD users are not really aware of this functionality, so here is a blog about it.

ANSYS ICEM CFD import

In previous versions, we had the Workbench readers under “File => Workbench Readers”. The Workbench readers really supersede the old ANSYS ICEM CFD readers. They are up-to-date, easy to use, and offer connections such as JT Open and SpaceClaim that ICEM CFD never supported on its own. Talking to users, we found that many thought the Workbench readers option would only work inside Workbench or if they installed Workbench. To make the option more obvious, we moved the Workbench readers to the top of the list and renamed it “Import Model.”

Why “Import Model” instead of “Import Geometry”? Because the Workbench readers also support mesh formats! You can even select a *.wbpj and get both the geometry and mesh. During the import process, you can filter to make it easier to find the files that you are looking for. For instance, you can switch it to SpaceClaim to filter for SpaceClaim documents. Select your particular file (some formats will show you a preview of it), and click Open. Continue reading

New DPM (Discrete Phase Model) Features in ANSYS Fluent 15.0

temperature distribution ansys fluent 15With the release of ANSYS Fluent 15.0 there were many enhancements and new features that I think make the software even more productive. Fluent users who routinely use the Lagrangian tracking model (also known as DPM) will find some features that make the simulation more robust and quick to converge along with many post-processing options. I have compiled a list of some of these options for you to try. Continue reading

Efficient Modeling of Fan Inlet Distortion

At ANSYS, we are continually improving our turbomachinery simulation capabilities. Some recent improvements are proving useful to engine manufacturers, enabling them to better understand the on-wing performance of their new fuel-efficient engines.

Fans in modern aircraft engines are very important in that they provide most of the thrust required by the aircraft. Their environment is very challenging though as they are frequently subjected to non-uniform inflow conditions. These conditions could be either due to flight operating requirements such as take-off and landing, the engine nacelle installation configuration, wake interference from aircraft fuselage or cross-flow wind conditions. Similarly, industrial land-based gas turbines in power plants can be subjected to inlet flow distortion due to upstream ducting or installation maintenance deterioration. Continue reading

Why I Love Working with the Infiniti Red Bull Racing Team and Simulation

On March 27 at 4 pm GMT, 12 pm EST, I will have the pleasure to participate in an exclusive, one-time, non-recorded webinar hosted by SAE international with Al Peasland (Head of Technical Partnerships, Infiniti Red Bull Racing) and Nathan Sykes (Team Leader for CFD and FEA, Infiniti Red Bull Racing).

The RB10 Red Bull Racing Formula 1

The RB10 Red Bull Racing     Formula 1

Since the birth of the Infiniti Red Bull Racing (IRBR) Formula 1 team almost 10 years ago, simulation has played a vital role in assisting the team to develop its cars aerodynamics through its CFD software and services. I have been the technical account manager for the IRBR account for over 6 years. In addition to developing and solidifying our technology relationship, I have witnessed first hand the impressive integration of ANSYS software into a Formula 1 CFD process. I take great joy (and pride!) working tirelessly and collaboratively with IRBR to deliver technology that has proved superior in concept and execution, ultimately helping to design the cars that have delivered the quadruple championships, which have been awarded to the team over the last four consecutive years. Continue reading

Reliable Turbomachinery Blade Development

Our Tech Tips for reliable turbomachinery blade development looks a little different this month because (unbeknownst to me) our IT department is moving some equipment this weekend, and well, I didn’t want you to miss out, so we’re cross-publishing this one on turbomachinery here on the blog!

Turbomachinery Blade Development with Aero-Mechanical Simulation

Engineers need advanced simulation tools to enable them to meet customer demands for more-efficient and reliable high-performance machines. Engineers must accurately predict aerodynamic performance across an increasingly wide range of speeds and operating conditions, and they also must guarantee reliability in the design. For example, they need to ensure that blade vibration will be damped across the operating range and that cyclic unsteady loading will not impact design life.  Continue reading