Submodeling: Simple Solutions for Large-Scale Problems

If you’re an engineer who has dealt with large simulation models, you know there’s often a trade-off between accuracy and solution time. Submodeling is a technique you can use to reduce solution time without sacrificing accuracy of results.

A common strategy you can use to look at the overall behavior of an assembly or complex part of a large model is to simplify the model during preparation by removing small details, like fillets and holes. Simplifying models in this way can have a significant impact on run times. This simplification, while not excessively affecting overall model stiffness, may result in lower resolution of localized stresses. What you need, then, is a mechanism that allows you to “zoom in” on these details to examine behavior around specific areas.

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Take a Load Off! Lightweighting for Engineers

I was fortunate enough to own a Lotus Elise for a number of years. I loved that car but had to give it up when I moved to the U.S. One of the reasons I liked it so much was the design philosophy it followed: “performance through lightweight.” The reduced mass of the car meant the relatively small engine could shove it along at a fair old rate, which is pretty obvious. But it also meant that the suspension didn’t have to be as beefy, and the amount of work the brakes had to do was also significantly reduced. Lightweighting has big benefits.

It’s a very virtuous cycle. Removing weight has a compound impact on pretty much all aspects of the car. Probably one of the least mentioned benefits (considering that this was a sports car) was the fuel economy. When I was driving at a steady speed on the motorway I could easily get better economy than a family sized diesel car. Continue reading

Building Bridges Between Design Engineers and Analysts Using Engineering Simulation Software

Many companies, large and small, have individuals or groups using powerful engineering simulation software like ANSYS Mechanicalone of our flagship products. These analysts tackle some of the most complex and challenging engineering problems for their organizations.

These same companies often also have separate teams of engineers working daily on new and evolving product designs. They are often experts in CAD modeling, using CAD-embedded simulation tools to evaluate their designs. These basic simulation tools provide some useful guidance, but often fail to provide the accurate results needed to refine and optimize designs with confidence. Consequently, many design simulations must be handed off to the relatively small number of simulation analysts using trusted simulation tools like ANSYS Mechanical. Continue reading

Geomechanics: Rock Solid Simulation

Terra-firma, rock-solid and concrete are terms that all inspire images of stability. What could be more reassuring than the support of a good solid foundation? The truth of the stability of terra-firma, rock formations and geomechanics in general is not quite as clear cut as it seems.

As engineers everywhere push the limits of speed, power and capability of products we buy every day, there are also awe inspiring feats of engineering that go unseen to most eyes. Engineers working on civil, oil & gas and infrastructure projects that work on huge scales and push technology just as hard. Continue reading

3 P’s of Structural Analysis

I’ve been involved in engineering simulation for 20 years. Not quite sure exactly how that happened, but none-the-less here we are. Back in 1996, when I was studying engineering, a good part of my course looked at the fundamentals of FEA for structural analysis and CFD for flow simulation. We spent an inordinate amount of time manually calculating how a five-element beam would behave. I dread to think how many trees were sacrificed at the expense of my scruffy algebra.

I learned two key things from this exercise. FEA was incredibly useful —I could get an engineering answer to a reasonably realistic problem by using this approach — and that FEA software was a must if I wanted to do this on a more meaningful model. Continue reading

Shake, Rattle and Roll! Simulating Vibration, Impact and Fatigue for IoT

Did you know that NASA has shown that 45 percent of the first-day spacecraft electronics failures were due to damage caused by vibrations during launch? That American consumers have spent over $6 billion repairing and replacing smartphones after they’ve been dropped? With the Internet of Things (IoT), electrical devices and systems must be more resilient than ever, resistant to changes in temperature, dust infiltration, electromagnetic interference, vibration, impact, and fatigue. Continue reading

Dependable Composite Design

Determining the applicability and reliability of composite materials can be extremely complex. Engineering layered composites involves many definitions including numerous layers, materials, thicknesses and orientations to predict how well the finished product will perform under real-world working conditions. Simulation can assist you in predicting stresses and deformations as well as a range of failure criteria for composite design. ANSYS Composite PrepPost software provides all necessary functionalities for finite element analysis of layered composites. New capabilities released with ANSYS 17.0 can make to easier to effectively design composites. Continue reading

Linear Dynamics Just Got a Whole Lot Faster

BGA ball grid arrayDo you routinely tackle mechanical simulations in the field of linear dynamics? Are you unhappy with your simulation times? If you answered yes to both of these questions then keep on reading. ANSYS Mechanical 17.0  has many exciting new features — far too many to cover here. This post focuses on only one of these new features: the improved performance for linear dynamics simulations in Distributed ANSYS. Continue reading

Advanced Mesh Morphing in ANSYS Mechanical

It is a great pleasure to guest blog for ANSYS again after my post in 2014 entitled Reshaping the Future of CFD Using Mesh Morphing. We continue to increase our commitment to deliver the high-performance mesh morphing technology of RBF Morph and began our new product project at the beginning of 2014.

We presented the first industrial applications at the Automotive Simulation World Congress in Tokyo in October 2014, and officially launched the RBF Morph ACT Extension on the market at the ANSYS Italian UGM in May 2015. At the end of 2015, we posted a free version (with limited functionality) in the ANSYS App Store. Continue reading

Seamless Integration of FKM Guideline in ANSYS Workbench with ACT

As we all know, a frequent challenge in FEM is the evaluation of stress results, in particular with cyclic stresses. The FKM guideline “Analytical Strength Assessment of Components” describes a static strength assessment as well as a fatigue strength assessment. This guideline was developed by the Advisory Board for Engineering and Research for various applications in mechanical engineering and other sectors. Continue reading