ANSYS http://www.ansys-blog.com Engineering Simulation Software Fri, 18 Aug 2017 02:54:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.1 http://www.ansys-blog.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/cropped-blog-header-1-32x32.jpg ANSYS http://www.ansys-blog.com 32 32 34579800 AESE: Simulation for a More Connected World http://www.ansys-blog.com/aese-2017-india/ http://www.ansys-blog.com/aese-2017-india/#respond Fri, 18 Aug 2017 02:54:47 +0000 http://www.ansys-blog.com?p=19036&preview=true&preview_id=19036 Today, after a video call with my kids at home, I feel more relaxed. Usually on long distance business travel, we are always concerned about the family at home. A few years ago long distance voice calls were not only … Continue reading

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Today, after a video call with my kids at home, I feel more relaxed. Usually on long distance business travel, we are always concerned about the family at home. A few years ago long distance voice calls were not only costly but also of poor voice quality. Now, equipped with mobile phones, we can make high-quality audio/video calls and exchange text messages with people around the globe, at little or no cost.

It’s amazing to see the way communication technology has grown over the years. Technologies that seemed like fiction a few years ago, are now becoming reality. These include virtual reality, 3-D hologram and printing, language translation, and mobile streaming audio and video. 

Engineers worldwide are increasingly turning toward simulation to design the network and wireless equipment of the future. Simulation driven product development has helped organizations to identify issues in early design stage, reduce the number of prototypes with shorter design cycles and develop a robust and compliant electronic equipment.

For example, Alacatel-Lucent employed simulation to reduce the cost of high-speed networking equipment by 67% and Clariphy Communications utilized simulation to design the LightSpeed-II™ optical networking solution to drive the backbone of IoT, winning the 2016 Lightwave Innovations Award.

Want to learn more about how you can improve electronic system design using simulation?

I invite you to join us on September 1st in Bangaluru, India to participate in the ANSYS Electronics Simulation Expo.

The ANSYS Electronic Simulation Expo (AESE), is an international conference that provides attendees an opportunity to meet foremost electronics simulation thought leaders, see how major global companies are using simulation, learn best practices, see the latest technology advances and network with their peers.

Highlight of talks:

  1. Signal and Power Integrity for High-speed Boards
  2. Electromagnetic Interference and Compatibility (EMI/EMC)
  3. Chip Package Co-Simulation for HPC and Mobile Electronics
  4. PCB Electromagnetic and Thermal Reliability
  5. Thermal Management of Large Data Centers

Check out the full agenda and register today!

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Structural Simulation Delivers Modular Wi-Fi Towers Quickly http://www.ansys-blog.com/structural-simulation-modular-wi-fi-towers/ http://www.ansys-blog.com/structural-simulation-modular-wi-fi-towers/#respond Wed, 16 Aug 2017 13:13:42 +0000 http://www.ansys-blog.com?p=18678&preview=true&preview_id=18678 Wi-Fi access today seems more like a right than a privilege. But easy access to Wi-Fi is not widespread in many countries, especially in out-of-the-way rural areas where structural design and building of Wi-Fi towers can be challenging. In the … Continue reading

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Wi-Fi access today seems more like a right than a privilege. But easy access to Wi-Fi is not widespread in many countries, especially in out-of-the-way rural areas where structural design and building of Wi-Fi towers can be challenging. In the interior of Brazil, only 22 percent of the people have Wi-Fi due to the costs of installing towers and the economics of providing service to sparsely populated areas. But startup Jet Towers is trying to remedy this situation using ANSYS AIM for structural simulation to design prefabricated, modular truss towers that can be installed and running within a week of purchase, instead of the normal five weeks for custom designed Wi-Fi towers.

Simulation helps design Wi-Fi towers

The idea is simple: instead of re-inventing the tower for every order and then cutting the steel, shipping the individual pieces and bolting and welding the tower onsite, Jet Towers decided to build a series of triangular truss modules that they could keep in stock for design and shipment. The triangular modules are tapered so that the top of each unit is smaller than its base. The sizes of the various modules are designed so that they can be stacked from a wide base to a tapering peak of the desired height for any customer.

Using a spreadsheet-based system, the Jet Towers customer service personnel, with no engineering knowledge, can determine the necessary components and quickly provide a quote to a customer based on the desired height of the tower. Because the modules are in stock, the order can be gathered and shipped to the assembly site immediately.
Jet Towers’ lone engineer used structural simulations to ensure that the towers had sufficient strength to bear the weight of the Wi-Fi antennas that send and receive the signals. But the simulation did not stop there. He also used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to make sure any tower could withstand the wind forces that the tower and its antennas might encounter.

Working in the ANSYS AIM integrated simulation environment made these simulations easy to perform. With ANSYS AIM, every engineer can perform high-fidelity, up-front design simulations without compromising on speed, robustness or accuracy. It combines an easy-to-use, intuitive simulation environment with proven solver technology that customers depend on around the world. Try ANSYS AIM now, with nothing to download, no forms to fill out and no waiting.

The company built 35 towers in its first eight months in business. The combination of easy design, fast shipment and rapid assembly is helping it to beat its competitors in this growing market. And many more Brazilians are enjoying the pleasures of Wi-Fi connectivity.

To learn more about the Jet Towers success story, read the article in the latest issue of ANSYS Advantage magazine.

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Calibration of a Numerical Simulation with Experimental Results Critical for Reliable Predictions http://www.ansys-blog.com/calibration-numerical-simulation/ http://www.ansys-blog.com/calibration-numerical-simulation/#respond Tue, 15 Aug 2017 13:10:05 +0000 http://www.ansys-blog.com/?p=19012 Every numerical method relies on the accurate choice of models, solver settings, and material parameters in order to be able to mimic real-world behavior. This also applies to Discrete Elements Method (DEM) simulations. You could use standard material properties, but … Continue reading

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Every numerical method relies on the accurate choice of models, solver settings, and material parameters in order to be able to mimic real-world behavior. This also applies to Discrete Elements Method (DEM) simulations. You could use standard material properties, but adjusting those material interaction parameters using automated calibration methods is a key step for accurate simulations.

You could use standard material properties, but if you want to simulate reality, it is important to understand that the materials actually vary from site to site. Adjusting those material interaction parameters using automated calibration methods is a key step for accurate simulations. Even with basic materials, friction and restitution coefficients between particles and particles and boundaries have to be adjusted in order to accurately predict the bulk flow behavior. When extra forces come into play, such as adhesion forces, those additional parameters also need to be selected and properly specified.

In general, the calibration process consists of reproducing simple experimental tests and verifying the matching between numerical results and experimental data. Multiple simulations are run on the simple cases in order to find the set of parameters that best fit the experimental values. Then those same parameters can be used in the more complex simulation with confidence. With enough time and patience and an experienced engineer, this can be done with manual iterations. But, by far, the best way is with automated solutions that can select and vary the input parameters automatically based on sensitivity analysis and meta modeling techniques. These algorithms have built in intelligence to automatically reduce the number of cases to be run and they can be trusted to seek out those critical coefficients as efficiently as possible.

Snapshot of the performed angle of repose simulation

As you know, ANSYS wants your tools to work together to help you design the best products possible. We love it when our partners work together in the Workbench environment to bring you solutions that do this. For instance, the integration between ANSYS Optislang and Rocky DEM within ANSYS Workbench makes calibration of a DEM problem a straight forward and efficient process.

Metamodel of Optimal Prognosis (MOP) for the simulated angle of repose, which is an average over the pile and depends on the dynamic and the rolling friction.

Want to know more about Rocky DEM – ANSYS optiSLang?

Join the ANSYS in Action webinar on August 17th to learn how the automated calibration of a numerical simulation with experimental results can help to improve the credibility of the simulation results with all stakeholders. In this webinar, we will demonstrate the setup of an automated analysis for angle-of-repose and drawn-down-angle simulations performed using Rocky DEM. Come and see how easy it is to use sensitivity analysis and meta-modeling techniques to find the best fit of particle-specific data with the experimental data.

While we will demonstrate how to apply Rocky DEM inside ANSYS optiSLang, the presented workflow can be applied to any FEM, CFD or electromagnetic simulation model.

 

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The Engineering Behind Why It’s Too Hot to Fly http://www.ansys-blog.com/too-hot-to-fly/ http://www.ansys-blog.com/too-hot-to-fly/#comments Mon, 14 Aug 2017 14:59:43 +0000 http://www.ansys-blog.com/?p=18663 I’ve read a lot of articles talking about an interesting fact: this summer was so hot that in some cities like Phoenix aircraft could not fly. If you are an engineer or a pilot, it should not be a surprise … Continue reading

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I’ve read a lot of articles talking about an interesting fact: this summer was so hot that in some cities like Phoenix aircraft could not fly. If you are an engineer or a pilot, it should not be a surprise that in hot weather an aircraft’s performance can deteriorate until the point it is unsafe to attempt take off. But maybe you have not considered all the possible causes of why it’s too hot to fly. I will try to explain things in a very basic and simplified way, for the benefit of those who are not familiar with these phenomena.

American Airlines canceled dozens of flights out of Phoenix on June 19 due to extreme heat. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Air density
We all know that an aircraft flies due to the lift force acting on its wings that is generated by the relative movement of the wing and the air. If you move the wing fast enough it will lift, just as you learned when you were a child putting your hand out of your car window — at the right angle the air pushes your hand upwards. Of course an airplane is bigger and heavier than your hand. But the principle is the same — the aircraft just needs more speed and more surface area to generate enough lift.

However, the amount of lift produced is also proportional to the density of the fluid, in this case air, that the wing is moving through. Increase the density and you increase the lift force. Conversely if the density of the air decreases, so does the available lift force.

Air density changes with pressure (and so with altitude), temperature and humidity. An Aircraft’s performance is defined in “standard air”, that has a temperature at sea level of 59° F (at 29,92 inches of mercury of pressure). When it is very hot, air becomes less dense and you need more speed to takeoff and to keep the aircraft aloft. To reach a higher takeoff speed means you need much more runway. As there are safety margins to consider, the available runway can simply be not long enough. Plus, your climbing angle will be flatter and your climbing rate will be lower, and you could be unable to follow the published takeoff procedure for a specific airport.

Every time pilots take off, they use the conversion tables in their operating manuals to see if the conditions of pressure, temperature and humidity and the performance of the aircraft are compatible with the length of the runway and the climb rate they will need to clear any obstacles. In extreme cases, hot summer temperatures can be a take off limiting factor.

Engine thrust
Engines have a maximum turbine temperature that pilots must monitor and control. Above that limit the engine can suffer damage. Take off is when you ask the engine to give you more thrust, so the internal temperature is higher. An already high external air temperature and lower air density makes further demands of the engine.

In order to avoid overheating and possible engine failures during take off, pilots input the external temperature in the flight computer to receive as an output the “take off power set”, which is the maximum percent of the engine thrust you can safely ask of your engine. In very hot weather, it will be far below 100%.

A curiosity: You will probably be surprised by the fact that the take off power used by airlines is usually below 100%. This allows for noise to be reduced, an increase in time between engine overhauls and it also saves some fuel. What pilots usually do is to calculate the maximum air temperature at which the take off can be safely performed and put it in the flight computer, so the FADEC (Full Authority Digital Engine Control) automatically calculate the takeoff power setting and speed.

When air is too hot, the calculated takeoff power set may not be enough for a safe takeoff on that runway, so the aircraft is grounded. Takeoff power depends on the aircraft takeoff weight too, so your flight computer may tell you that, despite of the very hot air, it is safe to fly with a lighter configuration — meaning the flight must leave some passengers or freight behind or to plan for a refueling stopover — but both of these options impact the profitability of the flight for the carrier.

Composites materials
If you fly a new generation aircraft, the probability that it is built with a significant proportion of composite, glass fiber or carbon fiber reinforced material is high. They are great materials, light and resistant, but some of them have a temperature limitation. The pilot checks these limits as part of the routine pre-flight inspection to be sure they can fly.

Not only hot
Did you know that there is also a minimum operational temperature? Also when the aircraft is aloft? For example, if you are the pilot of an Airbus A320 and you see a temperature below -94° F at 39,000 ft. it’s better for you to ask for a descent or increase your speed to have a couple of degrees more, or there is an increased risk that fuel may begin to freeze in the pipes.

The aircraft evolution
Aerodynamics has played a big role in the evolution of aircraft design: if you can reduce drag and increase lift your airplane will be able to fly in hotter weather, and be more efficient every flight. Lightweighting is another way of improving aircraft capabilities in hot temperatures. Topology optimization together with new composite materials and production technologies such as additive manufacturing are going in that direction.

We have a new generation of engines, able to produce more power and run with thinner, less dense air that take advantage of not only mechanical and fluid dynamics enhancements but also of complex embedded control software. Electric aircraft are coming, and will stretch the limits of what we have today. This will help to take off on very hot days, but above all will lead to a much better fuel efficiency, lower environmental impact and a significant reduction of operating costs.

Simulation plays a key role in designing more efficient aircraft. If you are curious, have a look at this video to see how.

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PowerCone™ Wind Turbine Development Accelerated with Simulation http://www.ansys-blog.com/wind-turbine-accelerating-simulation/ http://www.ansys-blog.com/wind-turbine-accelerating-simulation/#respond Fri, 11 Aug 2017 20:59:48 +0000 http://www.ansys-blog.com?p=18608&preview=true&preview_id=18608 The journey of BiomeRenewables’ PowerConeTM wind turbine started with witnessing a falling maple seed. I was sitting on my deck when I was struck by how slowly the seed was able to fall. As it turns out, maple seeds — for … Continue reading

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Artist rendering of the PowerCone

The journey of BiomeRenewables’ PowerConeTM wind turbine started with witnessing a falling maple seed. I was sitting on my deck when I was struck by how slowly the seed was able to fall. As it turns out, maple seeds — for their size — exhibit maximum aerodynamic efficiency; they are able to hit what is known as the Betz Limit — 59.3 percent aerodynamic efficiency. Careful analysis revealed that there is something about the seed’s shape and the way it interacts with the air that allows it to achieve such high efficiency numbers — namely, that it interacts with the oncoming flow at an angle greater than 90 degrees. This is not the case with modern wind turbines, which interact with the wind at perpendicular angles of 90 degrees.

Starting it up
I soon realized that there was an extraordinary opportunity for this bio-based geometry. We could create a device with three troughs, each with angles matching that of the maple seed, and place it in the center of the turbine. The phenomena of “rotor root leakage” in wind turbine blade design has plagued the industry for decades. The vast majority of rotor blades have a cylindrical root at the center that confers little to no aerodynamic advantage to the turbine — in fact it hinders it, causing a pressure imbalance across the rotor disk which leads to a multitude of other problems for wind farm owners. By covering some of this area and shunting flow radially towards the suction side of the blade, we can confer more aerodynamic efficiency to the turbine.

Through various small-scale prototypes set in real-world wind conditions and controlled wind tunnels, my BiomeRenewables team succeeded in demonstrating what the PowerCone was capable of: industry leading performance, at least at small scale. The PowerCone was producing annual energy production (AEP) increases of more than 10 percent, as well as improving the capacity factor, turbine cut-in and loading conditions.

TUDelft Wind Tunnel Study

Throughout this period of development, 1:50th scale models tried to simulate as closely as possible how the PowerCone would perform at full scale. This meant paying attention to points of friction, materials and tip speed ratios — the ratio of the blade tip velocity to incoming wind velocity. In addition to this, Reynolds numbers become important in assessing the validity of any experiment. While it is possible to account for tip speed ratios in scaled models, Reynolds numbers (which describes in broad terms how fluids behave across scales) are inputs that can only be determined for certain at our final full scale. Aerodynamics is a tricky and sometimes counter-intuitive business: fluid-dynamics is considered one of the hardest branches of the physical sciences to master, let alone understand! That’s where computers can help.

Scaling it up
Before mounting the PowerCone on an actual wind turbine and incurring the associated risks, we at BiomeRenewables wanted to understand how the wind would interact with the PowerCone-enabled wind turbine at full scale, and if the small-scale performance would carry over. This is where ANSYS CFX software, obtained through the ANSYS Startup Program, became particularly useful.

This software enabled BiomeRenewables’ engineering team to model the prototype in a variety of wind conditions with rotating domains and a mesh resolution equivalent to 75 million cells, producing extremely detailed analysis of flow patterns, vortex formation and boundary layer effects in record time. Through this process, we realized that we could extract even more performance from the PowerCone by altering its geometry, amplifying torque production and strengthening our business case.

ANSYS simulation of the PowerCone

Through the ANSYS Startup Program, BiomeRenewables was able to leverage a highly iterative design process to increase the performance of our flagship product offering and minimize the risk of the entire project to investors and the wind community at large. We are now in the process of planning a full-scale demonstration of the PowerCone technology, with commercial partners waiting eagerly for results.

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The Next Big Thing in Engineering Simulation http://www.ansys-blog.com/next-big-thing-engineering-simulation/ http://www.ansys-blog.com/next-big-thing-engineering-simulation/#respond Wed, 09 Aug 2017 15:53:04 +0000 http://www.ansys-blog.com?p=18936&preview=true&preview_id=18936 All great discoveries and inventions begin with a vision. A vision to make a better product, solve a unique problem or make life easier in some capacity. For centuries scientists and engineers have made tremendous progress in discovering scientific phenomena, … Continue reading

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All great discoveries and inventions begin with a vision. A vision to make a better product, solve a unique problem or make life easier in some capacity. For centuries scientists and engineers have made tremendous progress in discovering scientific phenomena, or in solving technological challenges. I could write extensively about many of those inventions and discoveries, but there is one I would like to highlight.

In 1928, a Scottish biologist named Alexander Fleming returned to his lab from vacation. As he was sorting through some petri dishes he noticed something unusual. One particular dish had several colonies of bacteria and a cluster of mold. However, there was no bacteria growth near the cluster of mold. Although he did not realize the magnitude of his observation at that moment, he would later be credited with discovering the first lifesaving antibiotic, which he called penicillin.

ANSYS-New-technology-discoveries-Alexander-Fleming

“When I woke up just after dawn on September 28, 1928, I certainly didn’t plan to revolutionize all medicine by discovering the world’s first antibiotic, or bacteria killer,” Fleming said. ”But I suppose that was exactly what I did.”

Why is this story so intriguing? Because Fleming’s discovery was not what he was originally searching for. He was looking to do extraordinary work in his research, and spent countless hours experimenting and testing, only to make a monumental discovery by accident. What other breakthroughs and discoveries are out there, undiscovered due to limitations on time and cost of experimentation?

Think about all the other discoveries and inventions throughout history, and the time commitment involved in perfecting a product. Imagine where we would be today if the brilliant scientists and engineers before us had more sophisticated engineering tools to assist in developing their breakthroughs.

Now think about the vision of ANSYS technologies — Realize Your Product Promise. ANSYS makes advancements possible that might not have been discovered before. The engineering simulation technology that so many engineers use promotes better product designs through faster and more extensive virtual testing and experimentation. Do you ask yourself, “What happens if I change this variable or what if I adjust this input.. how will that affect my design performance?”  

On September 7th at 10 a.m. EDT, we will unveil a new technology that will facilitate discoveries and breakthroughs, and take engineers’ efforts to the next level. Product development will change, and simulation will be more accessible for every engineer.

You don’t want to miss this opportunity to catch the first glimpse of something entirely new from ANSYS. It just might be the next big thing in engineering simulation. Register NOW !! 

engineering simulation 3D design discovery

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ANSYS Job Postings This Week http://www.ansys-blog.com/ansys-job-postings/ http://www.ansys-blog.com/ansys-job-postings/#respond Mon, 07 Aug 2017 17:21:33 +0000 http://www.ansys-blog.com/?p=18931 ANSYS has posted some new jobs the week of July 30 – August 5, 2017. Take a look at them here or on our careers site. If you don’t see a job that interests you in this week’s listing, we … Continue reading

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ansys jobs hiringANSYS has posted some new jobs the week of July 30 – August 5, 2017. Take a look at them here or on our careers site. If you don’t see a job that interests you in this week’s listing, we post new openings every day. Visit our site often and apply.

New Open North America Positions

Software Developer I Canonsburg, PA
Software Developer II Lebanon, NH
Principal Software Developer San Jose, CA
Global Data Privacy Director Canonsburg, PA
Software Developer I Canonsburg, PA

New Open Worldwide Positions

Senior Account Manager Shanghai, China
Technical Support Engineer “Electrical Machines and drives” (m/f) Paris, France
Senior Technical Support Engineer (m/f) Darmstadt, Germany

We can only accept applications via our on-line careers site. Take a look and apply today!

ANSYS is an Equal Opportunity Employer

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Wireless Charging Design in Wearables Using Simulation http://www.ansys-blog.com/wireless-charging-design-wearables/ http://www.ansys-blog.com/wireless-charging-design-wearables/#comments Fri, 04 Aug 2017 13:24:55 +0000 http://www.ansys-blog.com?p=18575&preview=true&preview_id=18575 Working for ANSYS gives me incredible opportunities to work with innovative companies and learn about the latest technologies that are being developed to improve our lives. One of the intriguing companies I have had the pleasure to work with is … Continue reading

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Working for ANSYS gives me incredible opportunities to work with innovative companies and learn about the latest technologies that are being developed to improve our lives. One of the intriguing companies I have had the pleasure to work with is RF2ANTENNA. RF2ANTENNA works on developing innovative and easy-to-integrate products for specific applications in wireless communications and wireless charging, with the goal of improving the efficiency of IoT devices with affordable solutions. Their core competency is in providing solutions to radiation problems in mobile products. The ANSYS Startup Program has given them the opportunity to take their work to the next level.

Until recently, every device had to have a plug-in for the power source and other inputs and outputs, such as audio, video, network, etc. With advances in wireless communications, most of the plug-ins other than the one for the power source have disappeared over the last 10 years. Recent advances in wireless charging, however, are paving the way for new devices that have no visible ports or connectors. Many cell phone OEMs have already incorporated wireless charging into their designs. The real value of wireless charging, however, is when it is used on devices that cannot be removed, such as wearable electronics. In wireless charging designs for wearables, the coil designs must be customized to meet the needs of each device. In this blog, I will be talking about how RF2ANTENNA designed and optimized a wireless charging system using ANSYS tools.

wireless charging by leveraging simulation efficiency over CS

Contour plots of efficiency vs. different capacitor values

Power Transfer in Wireless Charging

A wireless charging system consists of coupled coils and charging circuits. There are different algorithms and techniques for wireless charging, but our focus here is mainly on optimizing power transfer from the source to the device that is being charged wirelessly. The efficiency of this power transfer directly affects the charging time and energy use regardless of the algorithms.

Leveraging ANSYS Simulation Software

Without going into the details of the coil designs, RF2ANTENNA engineers used ANSYS Maxwell 3D to extract the circuit values for the “wireless coupling mechanism.” They then used ANSYS Nexxim to optimize the circuit and the coils for the charging efficiency (the power delivered divided by the power received) by changing the values of the tuning capacitors (CS and CL) as shown in the CL versus CS plot. Since this was a wearable application, they also used ANSYS HFSS to plot the electric field strength on the human body (due to the charging current) using ANSYS’ human body model.

current on the charging device as simulated in ANSYS HFSS

Electric field distribution on the human body model
due to the current on the charging device as simulated in ANSYS HFSS

This work could have been done experimentally, of course, but that would involve building different sized coils and setting up a complex measurement system. Electric field distribution is very difficult to obtain experimentally, as it would require detailed models and precise measurement capabilities. The electric field distribution can be used to understand the human body’s exposure to electric fields associated with such wirelessly charged wearable devices.

ANSYS Maxwell 3D and ANSYS Nexxim helped RF2ANTENNA engineers to design the coils that were needed to optimize the efficiency of the charging mechanism. Without these tools, they would not be able to achieve the same quality of design using traditional measurement setups.

Looking to the Future

RF2ANTENNA will continue its efforts to create customized designs in the fields of wireless charging and antennas for mobile devices using ANSYS products. Their goal is to release their first product (which will be an antenna) for wireless communications this year. This product will enable IoT devices to communicate better with more range, so it can be used in RFID and mesh radio applications.

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Check Out the New Jobs at ANSYS http://www.ansys-blog.com/check-new-jobs-ansys/ http://www.ansys-blog.com/check-new-jobs-ansys/#respond Tue, 01 Aug 2017 14:47:17 +0000 http://www.ansys-blog.com/?p=18910 Check out the most recent postings of jobs at ANSYS. If you’re looking to make a career change, now may be the time. Don’t see what you’re looking for here? Visit our careers site for all of our latest openings. … Continue reading

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ansys jobsCheck out the most recent postings of jobs at ANSYS. If you’re looking to make a career change, now may be the time. Don’t see what you’re looking for here? Visit our careers site for all of our latest openings.

We update our careers site daily with our latest open jobs so check back often.

New Open North America Positions

Software Developer I – Workbench Graphics Canonsburg, PA
Lead Software Developer Lebanon, NH
Senior Manager HR Systems Canonsburg, PA

New Open Worldwide Positions

Account Manager Noida, India or Pune, India

We can only accept applications via our on-line careers site.

ANSYS is an Equal Opportunity Employer

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CFD Simulation of HVAC Systems on Trains Makes Rail Travel More Comfortable http://www.ansys-blog.com/cfd-simulation-trains-hvac-systems/ http://www.ansys-blog.com/cfd-simulation-trains-hvac-systems/#comments Mon, 31 Jul 2017 14:49:51 +0000 http://www.ansys-blog.com?p=18375&preview=true&preview_id=18375 Every time I travel in Europe, I enjoy riding the fast, comfortable trains. Riding from city center to city center without long security lines and tight uncomfortable airplane seats (worse for me because I’m tall!) can even make travel pleasant. … Continue reading

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Every time I travel in Europe, I enjoy riding the fast, comfortable trains. Riding from city center to city center without long security lines and tight uncomfortable airplane seats (worse for me because I’m tall!) can even make travel pleasant. But, I’ve always taken that comfort for granted. Were trains not always that way? Then, I found out about the challenges that Siemens engineers face as they design passenger coaches. Now I have huge respect for those engineers. Read on to find out how CFD is making their lives easier while giving me the comfort I love.

Siemens Ice 4 Train HVAC Systems on Trains

While sometimes it seems that maintaining a comfortable temperature is impossible even in a non-moving office space, train passengers in Europe are guaranteed a pleasant ride by European Standard 13129 (EN13129). This standard sets out strict requirements for controlling air temperature, relative humidity and air speed within passenger compartments. It even specifies how many degrees the temperature can vary from the setpoint vertically and horizontally throughout a train car, and how warm or cool the walls, ceilings, windows and floors can be. To meet these tough standards, Siemens Mobility in Germany uses ANSYS CFD solutions to simulate airflow and thermal conditions for the HVAC systems in new ICE 4 passenger coaches.

Previously, engineers had to spend four months testing passenger train coaches in a wind tunnel to fine tune the HVAC systems to meet the standards. For these tests, they needed to install up to 800 sensors throughout a single passenger coach, and put heating pads in the seats to represent the heat output of passengers. Even with all this physical testing, the designers still could not be confident the coach would pass the standard until just before delivery. Looking for ways to improve this lengthy and costly process, Siemens climate control engineers used their experience with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation — and the availability of high-performance computing (HPC) — to develop an alternative method.

Instead of building and testing a physical prototype first and using CFD to verify the findings, Siemens engineers performed CFD digital prototyping up front. Running CFD simulations enabled the engineers to predict the thermal conditions throughout the passenger car — including the heat contribution coming from the passengers themselves. These predictions showed that the ICE 4 coach met the EN13129 standards for railway passenger comfort.

ANSYS simulation train comfort HVAC Systems Trains

Simulation model of ICE 4 trains

Afterward, to prove that the software was accurate the first time through, they built a physical model of the coach and tested it in a wind tunnel. Because the physical measurements agreed so well with the CFD predictions in this proof-of-concept trial run, Siemens engineers in the future will be able to rely on CFD simulations and dispense with much of the physical testing in demonstrating compliance with EN13129. Siemens estimated that simulation will save them up to 50 percent in reduced time and testing in the future.

To read more about using CFD for climate control in challenging conditions, read the full article in the latest issue of ANSYS Advantage magazine.

You might also be interested in our white paper “ANSYS Fluent with PRIMERGY HPC: HVAC for Built Environment,” which deals with how CFD has been used to design more efficient, comfortable and safer buildings.

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