ANSYS Webinars This Week – Nov 17th

ANSYS Webinar Learning EventsHow’s your Monday going? Mine is just GREAT! I’m watching the rain turn to snow from the window near my desk. I was also looking at the fabulous list of ANSYS webinars on the event calendar for the week of November 17 – 21 and just knew you’d be able to find something of interest to you.

We still have a healthy line up of topic for the remainder of the year, so if you want to do a little more advanced planning, visit our Events Calendar, sort by the type of event you’re looking for and time frame and get registered today! Continue reading

This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology Articles

Hello all! My top engineering technology picks of the week include a flying aircraft carrier, self-assembling furniture and a baseball-playing robot. Have a great weekend!

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Cars and Electronics in Tokyo: 2014 Automotive Simulation World Congress

This is the third year that ANSYS hosted the Automotive Simulation World Congress (ASWC), an international conference focused on engineering simulation in the ground transportation industry. The ASWC is an annual conference that rotates between the three major regions of the world. In previous blogs, I wrote about the 2012 and 2013 ASWC’s held in Detroit and Frankfurt respectively. This year the conference was held in Tokyo on October 9 and 10. Continue reading

Update on Tablet Computing and ANSYS Mechanical

Some time ago, I wrote a couple of posts describing the performance of ANSYS Mechanical APDL on several different tablet computers. Previously, I had studied two separate tablets: one from Fujitsu, which was more of a shrunken laptop with an Intel® Core i5 processor and a second from Dell, which had an Intel® Atom™ processor and was more in line with the look and feel of an iPad. The Fujitsu tablet was clearly faster, but bulkier and pricier. The Dell tablet was lighter, smaller, cheaper, and also less powerful. Continue reading

ANSYS on the Cloud? Making Remote Visualization Work

Increasingly, we’re hearing from ANSYS customers who are interested in running simulation on the cloud. Along with enthusiasm for elastic capacity, we also hear a lot of questions about feasibility. One set of these questions centers around the challenge of moving big simulation datasets between the end-user desktop and the cloud computing engine. Our response has been “don’t move the data, analyze it on the cloud”. And that leads to the next question:  “Can I run ANSYS on the cloud, and still maintain good interactive GUI and graphics performance?” Continue reading

ANSYS Webinars This Week – Nov 10

ANSYS Webinar Learning EventsThis week our ANSYS webinars line-up includes topics such as model-based systems engineering, product-related tutorials with ANSYS Mechanical and ANSYS Polyflow, as well as a very interesting look at how fluid simulation is used to better everyday life.

Our Improving Your Everyday Life webinar is a part of the Convergence Webinar Series. ANSYS customers, University of Parma and Bissell Homecare, Inc, give us insights into how they use simulation. Later in the week, researchers at Intevac and Ozen Engineering show how they simulated the fluid—structure interactions (FSI) of the human left ventricle with Hybertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy (HOCM) to better understand the condition in the hope of saving lives. Continue reading

This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology Articles

This week’s Top 5 engineering technology articles bring us closer to clean air, printable food, and mechanized war.

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Magnetoelasticity: A 20-Year Journey from Cornell to Michigan Tech to ANSYS INC.

I was reminded of Professor Francis Moon, Joseph C. Ford Professor of Engineering Emeritus, when I visited Cornell University this summer for the 2014 Engineering Development Forum. You see, 20 years earlier I had just completed my PhD dissertation in the area of magnetoelastic buckling, a topic that was initiated by Professor Moon in 1968. His breakthrough research created immense interest around magnetoelasticity in the research community. Continue reading