Admiring the Engineering Behind Machu Picchu

I recently had the pleasure of presenting the keynote presentation at the Convergence Conferences in Buenos Aires and Lima. ANSYS has a great partner in ESSS in South America, and everyone there was incredibly hospitable. While in Peru, I couldn’t resist the urge for a short side trip to one of the most popular bucket list destinations, Machu Picchu. What I wasn’t expecting during this once-in-a-lifetime trip was to get a quick and dirty lesson about engineering. Continue reading

AIMing for Better Biomedical Devices

Earlier this year, we introduced ANSYS AIM, the first integrated and comprehensive multiphysics simulation environment designed for all engineers. Check out Richard Clegg’s recent blog post for an overview.

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Since then, we’ve been applying AIM to a wide range of industrial applications, including the medical device industry, where AIM provides a modern, easy-to-use tool for a variety of applications. Continue reading

Aircraft Cabin Airflow: Curbing Disease Spread

For me, science and engineering has always been about designing solutions to the various problems in our everyday lives. When I began doing research in seventh grade, my very first project was a roof that converted the impact energy of precipitation into electricity to help power the home. The following year, I came up with a dynamically supportive knee brace that implements smart fluids to vary the amount of support that patients received, depending on the physical activity. Last year, I created a self-cleaning outdoor garbage bin to tackle the issue of urban sanitation in our neighborhoods.

raymond wang intel science fair winnerYet perhaps, I am best known for my most recent project, which won the 2015 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, out of 1,700 students nationally selected from 75+ countries. This year, I tackled the issue of airborne pathogen spread in aircraft cabins, generating the industry’s first high fidelity simulations of airflow inside airplane cabins. Using my insights, I engineered economically feasible solutions that altered cabin airflow patterns, creating personalized breathing zones for each individual passenger to effectively curb pathogen inhalation by up to 55 times and improve fresh air inhalation by more than 190%. Continue reading

ANSYS Webinars This Week

ANSYS Webinar Learning EventsHere’s the line up of ANSYS webinars for the week of June 15-19. Make sure you register to attend today. Each session ends with a LIVE Q&A. In the event your calendar is already booked up, by registering you can receive a link to the recording via email to watch at a time more convenient for you. Recordings are normally available within 72 hours. Continue reading

This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology Articles

Hello all! My top engineering technology picks of the week include a smart oven that helps you cook your food, how Google Glass is helping Parkinson’s patients and an autonomous camera that selects when to take photos. Have a great weekend!

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Mad About Designing a Smartwatch?

Click image to see his 2 watches in action

Jim Cramer is the host of Mad Money. I watch his high-energy, entertaining, investment show regularly. “Booyah!”. Yesterday, I was surprised to see his wrist loaded with two watches. As he didn’t explain, I can only guess as to why he was sporting his Apple Watch along with an analog timepiece. Continue reading

Using ANSYS CFD to Analyze High-Lift Wing Design

Agastya ParikhFour years ago, as a high school sophomore, I began work on an independent project that explored ways to improve the performance of high-lift systems used on the Airbus A330-300. One of the biggest challenges facing me was how to best conduct experiments to assess the performance of the different designs. In prior years, I had conducted simple research on aircraft wing design and aeroelasticity using unpowered balsa models of the aircraft being tested. To employ this same method would be unworkable for the relatively complex systems of flaps and slats required by the Airbus aircraft. I would have needed to build a larger scale model or perform wind-tunnel testing — neither of which was viable because I did not have access to equipment of the complexity required. Continue reading

Landing Gear: An Aircraft System We Take for Granted

Watching the news recently I saw a video of an aircraft landing without one of its landing gear fully deployed. Wonderful job by the pilots and crew.

As it turns out, it is not that difficult to find other on-camera examples.

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