The Evolution of Simulation and Rotating Machinery

It seems not all that long ago that I first attended the ASME International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) conference in Toronto. It was just a short drive from my office in Waterloo, Ontario. This year I took a much longer trip to Seoul South Korea to attend the ASME Turbo Expo. As I am already engaged in preparations for the 2017 edition that will be held in Charlotte, NC, I am reminded that much has changed in how rotating machinery is designed and operated. No doubt more evolution will be evident in the 2017 conference. One difference is that the conference will be held in conjunction with the ASME Power and Energy conference. I think that this makes a lot of sense, given the continued important role of turbomachinery in power and energy production and transmission. Continue reading

Developing Comprehensive Turbomachinery Simulation Solutions

I have always been fascinated by turbomachinery: pumps, compressors, turbochargers, state-of-the-art aircraft engines etc. Anything that spins is of interest. This is one of the key reasons why I love going to work at ANSYS every day. I can contribute to creating the best turbomachinery simulation solutions.

Demonstration simulation of the turbine side of a turbocharger, using a geometry design provided by our partner PCA Engineering.

Demonstration simulation of the turbine side of a turbocharger, using a geometry design provided by our partner PCA Engineering.

I am often asked “What are you working on? Turbines? Compressors? Hydraulic turbines?” Well, the answer is all of the above, and more. This is because our physics solutions are not limited by machine type, material or flow regime. Similarly, our turbomachinery-specific pre- and post-processing tools apply across machine categories. Besides, complex machines such as an aircraft engine have many parts: compressor, turbine, combustion chamber, complex secondary flow channels, etc. So with each new release of ANSYS, we strive to improve the simulation solutions that we provide to our turbomachinery customers.

Continue reading

Efficient Modeling of Fan Inlet Distortion

At ANSYS, we are continually improving our turbomachinery simulation capabilities. Some recent improvements are proving useful to engine manufacturers, enabling them to better understand the on-wing performance of their new fuel-efficient engines.

Fans in modern aircraft engines are very important in that they provide most of the thrust required by the aircraft. Their environment is very challenging though as they are frequently subjected to non-uniform inflow conditions. These conditions could be either due to flight operating requirements such as take-off and landing, the engine nacelle installation configuration, wake interference from aircraft fuselage or cross-flow wind conditions. Similarly, industrial land-based gas turbines in power plants can be subjected to inlet flow distortion due to upstream ducting or installation maintenance deterioration. Continue reading

ASME Turbo Expo Right Around the Corner

Heading to ASME Turbo Expo 2012

Well, it’s that time of year again. The ASME Turbo Expo (sponsored by the International Gas Turbine Institute, or IGTI) is right around the corner. For 20 of the past 23 years, this has meant a travel week for me, and this year it is to Copenhagen, Denmark, June 11 to 15. As turbomachinery is an important part of our business, ANSYS is a Silver Sponsor and strong participant in the event. And justifiably so. The ASME Turbo Expo is the premiere event for turbomachinery, bringing together the best and brightest from leading turbomachinery companies around the world. The draw is that the papers are generally of a high caliber, resulting from a peer review process that is generally only used for journal-quality publications. All the industry leaders are there, and the exposition is high quality and industry specific. Continue reading