The New Frontier of Embedded Software Cont’d

Continuing from my post yesterday about the new frontier of embedded software.

Nowadays it is not enough to just fly the plane, pilots have to manage tons of information while flying and they are connected with  other units on the battlefield through a network that allows real time co-ordination.

image of the F-104 Starfighter Cockpit

F-104 Starfighter Cockpit

image of Lockheed Martin F22A Raptor Cockpit

Lockheed Martin F22A Raptor Cockpit

Have you seen the cockpit of a new generation aircraft? Google the F-22 or the F-35 and compare them with the one from an F-104;  you will not recognize a single piece of equipment. Head to YouTube and enjoy a video showing the maneuverability of one of these modern airplanes. Amazing!

Today simulation is widely used, aerodynamics is now explored in detail so engineers can master all the phenomena that affect the flight even in extreme conditions, and new configurations allow these aircraft to challenge physics laws… and win!!  I’ve seen a Eurofighter Typhoon during a test flight operate at 80 knots and at no more than 100 feet from the runway — almost still in the air — flying with an angle of attack of 60 degrees. This could have been considered science fiction by an F-104 pilot.  I’m amazed by the maneuverability of the F-22 or what an SU37 can do. I’m always impressed and fascinated with how aircraft designers created these masterpieces of engineering. Continue reading

The New Frontier of Embedded Software – Part One

A few months ago at the ANSYS Worldwide Sales Conference, I had the opportunity to view the many advancements and get briefed on other news concerning our simulation platform. As part of this learning experience, I thoroughly enjoyed meeting our newest colleagues from Esterel Technologies and finding out how embedded software is becoming key in the development of a new generation of products. From aerospace to automotive and transportation, from medical devices to energy generation plants, it is an important piece of the Simulation-Driven Product Development vision. In a 2-part blog, I’ll explain what this means to me.

Part One

image of the Lockheed F-104C Starfighter

Lockheed F-104C Starfighter

As I’ve mentioned before I’m quite fond of aircraft, so I’ll illustrate this point by talking about some very famous military planes, starting with the glorious Lockheed F-104 Starfighter. This incredible aircraft was designed in the early 1950′s by a myth among engineers — Kelly Johnson. His goal was to create a light, easy-to-maintain, simple and cost-effective airplane that would climb as fast as possible to operating height and engage in hostile contact with radar-guided missiles. Continue reading

This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology News Articles

Happy Friday, folks! This week’s roundup of interesting engineering technology news articles includes how to recruit more female engineers, the world’s first electric tilt-rotor aircraft and a case study that examines steam turbine blade simulation.

Enjoy!

Continue reading

Simulation for Military Aircraft Ejection Seats

I’ve always been passionate about aircraft. When I served in the Air Force and took my pilot training, I learned a lot about how systems on military planes work. One of the most amazing components, to me, was the ejection seat, probably one of the most complex pieces of equipment on board.

image of parachute system

Drogue parachute system analysis with inset submodel of the critical area using nonlinear material properties. Courtesy CTC.

Even if the purpose of the seat is clear and simple — to provide the pilot a safe and immediate way out of the aircraft in case of accident — its job is a very tough one. The seat has to work in emergency conditions; it represents the last chance for a pilot to leave a severely damaged aircraft, maybe spiraling out of control. This system must be designed not to  fail despite the critical, varied and unpredictable conditions in which it will be used. That’s quite a challenge for designers! Let me give you an example. Continue reading