Accelerating Innovation Through HPC-Enabled Simulations

HPC Ferrari RacesMany engineers are using powerful simulation software but are still not deploying HPC to the full extent. Case in point, I presume most of you have heard about the 24 Hours of Le Mans race. There is one starting June 17. I find it very exciting, not least because teams of three drivers per car compete to complete the most laps around the 13.629-km Circuit de la Sarthe in 24 hours! The race cars reach more than 320 km/h on the straightaway, spending most of the 24 hours at full throttle.

Imagine the roar of the engine drowning out the cheers of the crowds as you speed smoothly around the track in a finely tuned (thanks to simulation) race car. Now imagine the track is a country road or dirt road, not so smooth or speedy now, is it? Continue reading

Efficiently Modeling Turbulent Combustion with Realistic Chemistry Using a Flamelet-Generated Manifold

The main challenge of turbulent combustion simulation is to resolve turbulent mixing together with the chemistry of combustion involving hundreds of molecular species, in a solution time that is compatible with engineering design. Steady diffusion flamelet-based turbulent combustion models have been used for nearly three decades. The computational efficiency of flamelet-based models has been the key to their widespread success in industrial applications. However, increasingly stringent emission requirements continuously push designers to incorporate more finite-rate chemistry effects for the engine simulations in a more comprehensive manner. Continue reading

CFD Helps Design Marine Vessels to Withstand Extreme Waves

Most of Brazil’s offshore resources are in deep waters so Petrobras has fostered substantial expertise to develop these fields. One area of importance is the design of marine vessels to withstand the extreme waves. While the discovery of 50 billion barrels of oil in recent decades has been a boon to Brazil’s economic outlook, the location of the oil has produced challenging engineering problems. Lying hundreds of kilometers offshore under up to 3,000 meters of seawater, 2,000 meters of rock and 2,000 meters of salt, the oil reserves are some of the most difficult to access on Earth. Engineers are systematically using best design practices and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to increase the safety of marine structures and vessels used to drill and produce oil from Santos Basin fields.

CFD simulation of an FPSO in extreme waves marine vesselsComputational fluid dynamics simulation of an FPSO in extreme waves.

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Engineering a Hyperloop Pod with ANSYS

Since starting out as a segmented group of individuals passionate about high-speed technology, Berkeley Hyperloop (bLoop) has come a long way in our (roughly) two years of existence. What started as a vague mission to create a broader impact on the future of transport is now a tangible team of engineers, designers, marketers, logisticians and everything in between and we have no plans of stopping now. Of course, we didn’t do it alone. We’d be remiss if we did not acknowledge the generous support of sponsors like ANSYS, sponsors that have helped us realize the dream of designing and bringing a functional Hyperloop pod to that only existed in our wildest dreams up until a few months ago.

berkeley hyperloop pod ansys Continue reading

ANSYS HPC: On to a Million Cores!

ANSYS CFD is on the verge of a second renaissance in high-performance computing (HPC). The first, spanning more than a decade, has seen tremendous leaps in both the depth and breadth of HPC capabilities. Depth (or heights, rather) in the size of the scalable clusters — first 1000s, then 10K, and recently 100K core counts — and breadth of coverage across solvers, physics, post-processing, even file I/O, covered the gamut of high-performance simulations. The trend, in fact, is exponential, as evident in this chart, and spans many years of ANSYS Fluent software releases. While there are other impressive scientific scalability demonstrations, ANSYS Fluent set the standard for industrial HPC CFD simulations. Continue reading

Solution Dependent Expressions for Fan Cooling Simulation with ANSYS AIM 18

In ANSYS AIM 18, design engineers have reason to be excited about increased functionality for fluids, structural, thermal and electromagnetics. While the foundational problem-solving functionality has existed since AIM 16, new functionality is being added in every release so AIM can better address niche applications. One such enhancement I’d like to bring to your attention is solution-dependent expressions for applications like fan cooling simulation. While this isn’t something I guarantee you’ll use in your everyday simulations, it is a powerful feature needed for certain calculations. Continue reading

Celebrating 20 Years of Solar Racing with ANSYS

On November 18, 2016, the Blue Sky Solar Racing team gathered at the MaRS Discovery District to celebrate our past achievements and to look forward to the future. We hosted a number of our industry sponsors, faculty supporters, and alumni who explored various displays on the team’s history including photos, trophies and artifacts from past cars. Four generations of cars were displayed at this event as well, including Cerulean (2007), Azure (2011), B-7 (2013) and Horizon (2015). It was an incredible way to celebrate the achievements of the past 20 years of Blue Sky Solar Racing with those who have been part of our journey. Continue reading

Better Particle Erosion Fluid Dynamics Modeling in ANSYS Fluent 18

ANSYS Fluent 18 has advanced erosion fluid dynamics modeling by adding three industry-standard models to the previous default model.

Erosion wear is the loss of material due to repeated impact of solid particles on a surface and causes major economic losses across diverse industries such as oil and gas, hydraulic transportation, and chemical processes. Erosion severely damages flow passages, valves and pipe fittings, leading to higher replacement costs as well as the loss of valuable production time. For example, some oil and gas fittings can fail after just 30 minutes of operation due to high erosion rates! Engineers need to quickly evaluate the erosion on dozens of design variations to find ways of stretching the part’s lifespan in order to reduce costs and maximize process up-time.

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FREE Cornell University Course Teaching Engineering Simulations

Do you or someone you know want to learn how to simulate exciting engineering applications using ANSYS and pick up a practical skill sought by employers? Starting next week, February 15th, Cornell University is offering a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) that teaches the hands-on use of ANSYS. This FREE online course entitled “A hands-on introduction to engineering simulations” is self-paced, enabling participants to go through the lecture videos and complete homework problems on their own schedule. Interested people can sign up now.

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Dragonfly: The Mysterious Insect Driving Engineering Innovation

Who hasn’t dreamt of flying like a bird? From Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings of flying machines to Otto Lilienthal’s gliders, inventors have focused, quite logically, on human transport. We now take flying on airplanes for granted. But mechanical flight on a smaller, insect-level scale is less well-known. Micro-air vehicles (MAVs) have gained popularity in recent years due to wide range of small-scale applications in areas such as military, transportation, electronics, security systems, search and rescue missions, video recordings and many more. Successful prototypes depend upon valid, yet imaginative, designs as a starting point.  Continue reading