Advanced Electric Machine Design with Electromagnetic and CFD Simulations

You may have read a quick blog post at Desktop Engineering about ANSYS’s electric machine simulation capabilities. Here we dive into the technical aspects and implications of thermal simulation for electric machines.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Modern electric machines are designed to meet a wide range of applications, all facing a variety of different technical challenges. They are designed to be compact with high power densities, to have integrated power electronics, to be high-speed for higher power density, and to handle harsh environments.

These challenges all have thermal implications that affect the lifetime and performance of the electric machine and power electronics, and must be balanced with cost goals. ANSYS simulation tools, Fluent and Maxwell, can be used to predict the thermal and electromagnetic performance of these systems, and can therefore be used to optimize design choices for both thermal and cost considerations while meeting all application objectives. Continue reading

Engineers Harness the Power of the Adjoint Solver

In a previous blog, I shared with you my excitement about the power of the adjoint solver technology for shape optimization from ANSYS. Since then I have been working tirelessly to make this remarkable technology even more capable. CFD engineers can now understand their designs better and can perform smart shape optimization, all for larger problems with richer physics thanks to the adjoint solver technology.

My numerous interactions with people from all around the world confirmed what I knew: the adjoint solver technology is powerful and has the capability to enable a sea-change in the fluid design process. The technology is already having a positive disruptive impact on design, especially among the early adopters. Products are being improved. Established concepts about some types of fluid systems and how they function have been overturned. New manufacturing procedures are being attempted in order to produce the shapes indicated by the adjoint.

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Clean Diesel is Really a Three-part System

I am sure many of you have heard of clean diesel. And, probably asked yourself what is it and how is it different from regular diesel. Are we refining fuel more — why is it called clean? That is just one part of it. Clean diesel is really a three-part system. One part is cleaner fuel, the second part is improvement in the combustion — more advanced engines— and the third part is new technologies that control emission and exhaust gasses. There are different emission control technologies that can further reduce emission from the diesel engines, but most dominant are diesel particulate filters (DPF), exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC). Continue reading

16 Cool New Features of ANSYS Fluid Dynamics 16.0

Another release of ANSYS fluid dynamics products, another round of great new capabilities. While some may say that a picture is worth a thousand words, I invite you to view the video below for more than 16,000 words on 16 Cool New Features of ANSYS Fluid Dynamics 16.0. And they are all winners — so this is not a ranking, just a list! Continue reading

ANSYS 16.0 ‘What’s New’ Webinars Schedule

ansys how to videos youtubeWith the release of ANSYS 16.0 last week, we know that you may be looking for more detail around “What’s New”. Our team of experts have put together a series of webinars over the coming weeks that will take a deeper dive into the enhancements you’ll see.

Register today for the webinar(s) that spark your interest. Continue reading

Can You Simulate a Better Peristaltic Pump?

The peristaltic pump has become popular across various applications since being patented in the U.S. more than 120 years ago, and technological advances continue to make it relevant. The pump alternates compression and relaxation in its hoses and tubes, drawing fluid in and out. Our throat and intestines are actually good examples of peristaltic pumps.

I recently studied peristaltic pumps with computer analysis to see if I could improve the design through simulation. Where was the starting point? As a multiphysics program, ANSYS’ software suite provided a complete solution to the simulation of a peristaltic pump and I used software ranging from ANSYS Mechanical and ANSYS Fluent to ANSYS Explicit Dynamics  Each tool has its unique capabilities and solved the problem at hand from different perspectives. Continue reading

Modeling Waves to Keep the Sea Clean

In 2013, over 4400 million tonnes of crude oil was extracted, which caters to roughly 33% of the global need for energy. Most of this oil is extracted from offshore sites and transported to shores for further processing. During this production and transport, if an accidental release of the crude or processed oil occurs, it is called Oil Spill. With the advancement of technology, volumes of oil spilled have reduced over last few decades, however, factors of human error and natural calamity can never be completely ruled out. Continue reading

Coupling Piezoelectric and Fluid Simulations

ink jet nozzle

Ink jet nozzle

Piezoelectric devices surround us in our everyday life. Our cars and trucks contain many piezoelectric devices, including fuel level sensors, air bag deployment sensors, parking sensors and piezoelectric generators in the wheels to power the tire pressure monitoring system. Your smartphones or tablet contains piezoelectric sensors that detect the motion and orientation of the device, which my kids were using to good effect to play “Need For Speed” yesterday. Many of us have ink jet printers at home, which can use piezoelectric printer heads to eject thousands of drops per second. Continue reading