10x More Reliable Electronic Systems

Reliable Electronic SystemsOn the 18th of February, we’re hosting a webinar showcasing some exciting new methods to increase the number of ways reliable electronic systems can be designed. You can register now but first let me tell you a little about why it’s important.

The proliferation of electronics into every product arena can’t be denied. Electronics bring huge benefits in terms of features and functionality to pretty much any device. This means that electronics are being placed in more varied environments — and subjected to more demanding loads — than ever before. Continue reading

The Most Read ANSYS Blog Posts in 2015

ansys blog highlights 2015As the year winds down, I thought I’d share some of the most read ANSYS blog posts of 2015 with you. From harmonic analysis to how germs spread when you sneeze,  I hope you’ll find these choices as interesting as I did.

SPOILER ALERT: We have some REALLY cool stuff coming in 2016 that you won’t want to miss! If you haven’t subscribed to the ANSYS blog yet, please make sure you do that now.

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HyperXite and the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Design Contest

Editors Note: Today’s Guest Blog is brought to you by HyperXite’s Project Leads at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) who are competing in the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Design Contest.

What if there was a system of transportation cheaper, faster and most importantly, safer than driving, flying or boating? This next evolution in transportation is the Hyperloop, to design and build a pod that can transport 840 people between Los Angeles and San Francisco at 760 mph while floating on a cushion of air. Developing this technology is, however, a huge endeavor and the SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Design Contest was created to ‘crowd source’ the design of the vessel. Continue reading

Mesh Creation for Large Fabricated Structure Analysis

FEA meshed ship hull structural analysis

Many structural analysis models that use shell elements consist of a large number of bodies that need to be connected together to create a valid analysis model. These structures are typically manufactured by welding, for example ship structures.

There are a number of methods that can be used in ANSYS Mechanical for creating this type of model, which requires the geometry to be meshed and connected. Continue reading

Simulation Speeds Innovation for Pump and Turbine Company

Gilkes Cooling pumps

Cooling pumps Courtesy Gilkes

On November 3rd, as part of the ANSYS Convergence webinar series, we will presenting an interesting story on how simulation has enabled a well-established company to move rapidly along the innovation curve. That company is Gilbert, Gilkes & Gordon Ltd., aka Gilkes. The company has successfully operated for over 150 years in the Lakes District of the United Kingdom. Their main products are small hydropower systems for generating electricity, and pumps for circulating cooling water in diesel engines. Continue reading

Never a Dull Moment in HPC – Trend Report

HPC trends

When one of my friends asked me on Saturday night what I like about my job, I started off by saying that “there is never a dull moment in high-performance computing. The computing landscape is constantly changing, the HPC ecosystem collaborations are so numerous and intriguing, and the strategic/economic value of HPC for simulation has never been greater” (or: relevance of HPC for organizations to become more competitive is so compelling).

All of this was very evident at last week’s ISC conference — one of world’s largest high-performance computing events — drawing this year over 2,800 attendees from 56 countries. Let me share with you a few exciting HPC trends observed during this conference.

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Blade Row Flow Modeling in ANSYS 16.0

As you have probably heard, in January of this year, ANSYS 16.0 was released with a full set of new features and exciting enhancements covering our entire simulation portfolio (see more here). But in this blog, I would like to tell you a little more about turbomachinery blade row flow modeling capability in ANSYS 16.0.

Transient blade row (TBR) simulation is an important analysis and design tool, enabling turbomachinery designers to reliably improve the performance and predict the durability of rotating machinery. Traditional  transient simulation methods are expensive since it requires simulation of all blades in the full 360 degrees  to accurately account for the pitch difference between adjacent blade rows. However, ANSYS CFX pitch-change methods resolve this challenge by providing time accurate  unsteady turbomachinery flow simulations on just a small sector of the machine annulus (typically simulating only one or a few blades, a reduced blade row model), thus tremendously reducing computing cost resources and and reducing the overall time to obtain the simulation. Continue reading

Developing Comprehensive Turbomachinery Simulation Solutions

I have always been fascinated by turbomachinery: pumps, compressors, turbochargers, state-of-the-art aircraft engines etc. Anything that spins is of interest. This is one of the key reasons why I love going to work at ANSYS every day. I can contribute to creating the best turbomachinery simulation solutions.

Demonstration simulation of the turbine side of a turbocharger, using a geometry design provided by our partner PCA Engineering.

Demonstration simulation of the turbine side of a turbocharger, using a geometry design provided by our partner PCA Engineering.

I am often asked “What are you working on? Turbines? Compressors? Hydraulic turbines?” Well, the answer is all of the above, and more. This is because our physics solutions are not limited by machine type, material or flow regime. Similarly, our turbomachinery-specific pre- and post-processing tools apply across machine categories. Besides, complex machines such as an aircraft engine have many parts: compressor, turbine, combustion chamber, complex secondary flow channels, etc. So with each new release of ANSYS, we strive to improve the simulation solutions that we provide to our turbomachinery customers.

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CFD and Structural Meshing: Who Moved My Node?

meshing“Meshing”… Usually throwing this single word to a group of structural or CFD analysts will start interesting and passionate discussions. Meshing is definitely a key part of the simulation process and requires attention. As analysts, how many hours did we or do we spend on meshing? Probably too many —  especially if you have been in the simulation world for many years and started when automation of meshing was not so common. But after all, meshing is just one of the tools that we need to get accurate results and we should spend more time looking at simulation results than meshing our models. Continue reading

ANSYS 16.0 ‘What’s New’ Webinars Schedule

ansys how to videos youtubeWith the release of ANSYS 16.0 last week, we know that you may be looking for more detail around “What’s New”. Our team of experts have put together a series of webinars over the coming weeks that will take a deeper dive into the enhancements you’ll see.

Register today for the webinar(s) that spark your interest. Continue reading