Taking Material Modelling to the Next Level – Implementing a user-defined constitutive equation using USERMAT

From a structural reliability point of view, it is very important to understand and accurately characterize the material behavior when designing or analyzing an engineering application.

In this respect, ANSYS Mechanical software provides a vast library of material models that can help users simulate various kinds of behaviors such as elasticity, plasticity, creep and hyperelasticity, just to name a few.

Although these models can be used to investigate the mechanical response of a large number of different materials such as metals, rubbers, biological tissues and special alloys, users may wish to incorporate their own material laws into ANSYS. Continue reading

Update on Tablet Computing and ANSYS Mechanical

Some time ago, I wrote a couple of posts describing the performance of ANSYS Mechanical APDL on several different tablet computers. Previously, I had studied two separate tablets: one from Fujitsu, which was more of a shrunken laptop with an Intel® Core i5 processor and a second from Dell, which had an Intel® Atom™ processor and was more in line with the look and feel of an iPad. The Fujitsu tablet was clearly faster, but bulkier and pricier. The Dell tablet was lighter, smaller, cheaper, and also less powerful. Continue reading

ANSYS Webinars This Week – Nov 10

ANSYS Webinar Learning EventsThis week our ANSYS webinars line-up includes topics such as model-based systems engineering, product-related tutorials with ANSYS Mechanical and ANSYS Polyflow, as well as a very interesting look at how fluid simulation is used to better everyday life.

Our Improving Your Everyday Life webinar is a part of the Convergence Webinar Series. ANSYS customers, University of Parma and Bissell Homecare, Inc, give us insights into how they use simulation. Later in the week, researchers at Intevac and Ozen Engineering show how they simulated the fluid—structure interactions (FSI) of the human left ventricle with Hybertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy (HOCM) to better understand the condition in the hope of saving lives. Continue reading

Magnetoelasticity: A 20-Year Journey from Cornell to Michigan Tech to ANSYS INC.

I was reminded of Professor Francis Moon, Joseph C. Ford Professor of Engineering Emeritus, when I visited Cornell University this summer for the 2014 Engineering Development Forum. You see, 20 years earlier I had just completed my PhD dissertation in the area of magnetoelastic buckling, a topic that was initiated by Professor Moon in 1968. His breakthrough research created immense interest around magnetoelasticity in the research community. Continue reading

When Universities Fly High – University of Naples

20140226_135427 (1)We are pleased to present a guest blog from Giovanni Paolo Reina and Angelo Della Sala at the University of Naples.

The weapon-aircraft integration is one of the most important aspects in military aircraft design and for the study of its performances. In particular store separation problems, i.e. problems related to the release of underwing bodies during the flight, are very critical because they occur during a flight operating condition. Continue reading

Six Myths of High-Performance Computing

six myths of high performance computingLooking back at my notes from conversations with many engineers during our recent ANSYS Convergence Conferences, I must admit that I still came across some myths and misconceptions about high-performance computing (HPC) for engineering simulation. Let me share six really striking ones with you:

  1. HPC is available on supercomputers only
  2. HPC is only useful for CFD simulations
  3. I don’t need HPC – my job is running fast enough
  4. Without internal IT support, HPC cluster adoption is undoable
  5. Parallel scalability is all about the same, right?
  6. HPC software and hardware are relative expensive

Continue reading

Coupling Piezoelectric and Fluid Simulations

ink jet nozzle

Ink jet nozzle

Piezoelectric devices surround us in our everyday life. Our cars and trucks contain many piezoelectric devices, including fuel level sensors, air bag deployment sensors, parking sensors and piezoelectric generators in the wheels to power the tire pressure monitoring system. Your smartphones or tablet contains piezoelectric sensors that detect the motion and orientation of the device, which my kids were using to good effect to play “Need For Speed” yesterday. Many of us have ink jet printers at home, which can use piezoelectric printer heads to eject thousands of drops per second. Continue reading

Electromagnetics – Structural Harmonics Coupling

Electric motors and generators produce vibrations and noise associated with many physical mechanisms. It’s always been of great interest to look at the vibrations and noise produced by the transient electromagnetic forces on the stator of a permanent magnet motor. Thanks to our products that made is possible through a direct coupling between ANSYS Maxwell and ANSYS Mechanical. The process of this coupling is to first carry out an electromagnetic simulation to calculate the forces per tooth segment of the stator. The harmonic orders of the electromagnetic forces are then calculated using Fourier analysis, and forces are mapped to the mechanical harmonic analysis of the second stage. As you might expect, a simulation environment — ANSYS Workbench— is used to integrate a seamless workflow. Continue reading