FREE Cornell University Course Teaching Engineering Simulations

Do you or someone you know want to learn how to simulate exciting engineering applications using ANSYS and pick up a practical skill sought by employers? Starting next week, February 15th, Cornell University is offering a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) that teaches the hands-on use of ANSYS. This FREE online course entitled “A hands-on introduction to engineering simulations” is self-paced, enabling participants to go through the lecture videos and complete homework problems on their own schedule. Interested people can sign up now.

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Dragonfly: The Mysterious Insect Driving Engineering Innovation

Who hasn’t dreamt of flying like a bird? From Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings of flying machines to Otto Lilienthal’s gliders, inventors have focused, quite logically, on human transport. We now take flying on airplanes for granted. But mechanical flight on a smaller, insect-level scale is less well-known. Micro-air vehicles (MAVs) have gained popularity in recent years due to wide range of small-scale applications in areas such as military, transportation, electronics, security systems, search and rescue missions, video recordings and many more. Successful prototypes depend upon valid, yet imaginative, designs as a starting point.  Continue reading

ANSYS Student in a Browser Powered by Frame and Microsoft Azure

Last year we announced ANSYS Enterprise Cloud, a complete end-to-end solution for medium-large enterprises, that is currently available on Amazon Web Services (AWS) with plans to support other public cloud providers, such as Microsoft Azure & Google Cloud, in the near future. While our ANSYS Open Cloud Strategy™ is hardware agnostic, giving our customers the option to use their hardware of choice (e.g. private/on premise cloud, public cloud, cloud hosting partners), this is not the only characteristic that makes our offering unique.

We designed our cloud offering to address a complete spectrum of pain points and needs, without forgetting our small-to-medium-sized business customers or the young students that embrace computer-driven engineering simulation for the first time. Continue reading