How ANSYS Simulation is Helping Virginia Tech Team to Optimize Hyperloop Pod

After placing fourth at the SpaceX Hyperloop Design Weekend in January 2016, as well as the first ever Hyperloop Pod competition in Los Angeles, California, Hyperloop at Virginia Tech is working tirelessly toward improving every aspect of their pod. The Virginia Tech design team comprises over 60 people, branching out to all majors within the university, from business to aerospace engineering. We currently follow a tick-tock engineering cycle, innovating for one competition, then optimizing for the next using ANSYS Simulation. Continue reading

UC Motorsports Wins the Dynamic Event with ANSYS CFD

Each year the University of Canterbury Motorsport (UCM) team in New Zealand pushes the boundaries of what can be achieved in racing; in 2016 they overcame their greatest challenge to date. After three years (2013-2015) of competing in the Australasian Formula SAE competition with an internal combustion engine vehicle , the team decided in 2016 to design and build New Zealand’s very first four-wheel drive (4WD) electric vehicle for the competition. The results were remarkable: UCM made history by becoming the first team with an electric vehicle to win a dynamic event at the Australasian Formula SAE competition.
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Engineering a Hyperloop Pod with ANSYS

Since starting out as a segmented group of individuals passionate about high-speed technology, Berkeley Hyperloop (bLoop) has come a long way in our (roughly) two years of existence. What started as a vague mission to create a broader impact on the future of transport is now a tangible team of engineers, designers, marketers, logisticians and everything in between and we have no plans of stopping now. Of course, we didn’t do it alone. We’d be remiss if we did not acknowledge the generous support of sponsors like ANSYS, sponsors that have helped us realize the dream of designing and bringing a functional Hyperloop pod to that only existed in our wildest dreams up until a few months ago.

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Formula Motorsports: Accelerating Race Cars through Simulation

UWashington Formula Motorsports is a student-organized team that competes in Formula SAE. We design, build and test two small, formula-style race cars for the competition: one combustion and one electric. Each year we compete nationally and internationally at Formula Student Lincoln and Formula Student Germany. Everything our club produces is done entirely in-house. We produce our own designs, perform our own machining, and manufacture our own carbon fiber parts. Through the entire design process, UWashington Formula Motorsports strives to validate design decisions with sound engineering methods, and the simulations we run using ANSYS make this possible. Continue reading

FREE Cornell University Course Teaching Engineering Simulations

Do you or someone you know want to learn how to simulate exciting engineering applications using ANSYS and pick up a practical skill sought by employers? Starting next week, February 15th, Cornell University is offering a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) that teaches the hands-on use of ANSYS. This FREE online course entitled “A hands-on introduction to engineering simulations” is self-paced, enabling participants to go through the lecture videos and complete homework problems on their own schedule. Interested people can sign up now.

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Dragonfly: The Mysterious Insect Driving Engineering Innovation

Who hasn’t dreamt of flying like a bird? From Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings of flying machines to Otto Lilienthal’s gliders, inventors have focused, quite logically, on human transport. We now take flying on airplanes for granted. But mechanical flight on a smaller, insect-level scale is less well-known. Micro-air vehicles (MAVs) have gained popularity in recent years due to wide range of small-scale applications in areas such as military, transportation, electronics, security systems, search and rescue missions, video recordings and many more. Successful prototypes depend upon valid, yet imaginative, designs as a starting point.  Continue reading

ANSYS Student in a Browser Powered by Frame and Microsoft Azure

Last year we announced ANSYS Enterprise Cloud, a complete end-to-end solution for medium-large enterprises, that is currently available on Amazon Web Services (AWS) with plans to support other public cloud providers, such as Microsoft Azure & Google Cloud, in the near future. While our ANSYS Open Cloud Strategy™ is hardware agnostic, giving our customers the option to use their hardware of choice (e.g. private/on premise cloud, public cloud, cloud hosting partners), this is not the only characteristic that makes our offering unique.

We designed our cloud offering to address a complete spectrum of pain points and needs, without forgetting our small-to-medium-sized business customers or the young students that embrace computer-driven engineering simulation for the first time. Continue reading