Advanced Electric Machine Design with Electromagnetic and CFD Simulations

You may have read a quick blog post at Desktop Engineering about ANSYS’s electric machine simulation capabilities. Here we dive into the technical aspects and implications of thermal simulation for electric machines.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Modern electric machines are designed to meet a wide range of applications, all facing a variety of different technical challenges. They are designed to be compact with high power densities, to have integrated power electronics, to be high-speed for higher power density, and to handle harsh environments.

These challenges all have thermal implications that affect the lifetime and performance of the electric machine and power electronics, and must be balanced with cost goals. ANSYS simulation tools, Fluent and Maxwell, can be used to predict the thermal and electromagnetic performance of these systems, and can therefore be used to optimize design choices for both thermal and cost considerations while meeting all application objectives. Continue reading

What is Mesh Nonlinear Adaptivity?

Many FEA applications can benefit from the ability to strategically modify a mesh during solution, in order to simulate challenging geometry distortions which otherwise cannot be solved. Unlike manual rezoning, mesh nonlinear adaptivity is completely automatic, requiring no user input during solution.

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5 Improved Workflows for Rotating Machinery Design and Analysis

There have been a number of new and exciting workflow enhancements included in ANSYS 16.0 for those who design and analyze rotating machinery to make data transfers and simulation setup easier. Here are the top five enhancements:

1) BladeGen to BladeEditor

In ANSYS 16.0, it is now possible to load BladeGen data into BladeEditor in Workbench. Users could always link BladeGen to BladeEditor (i.e ImportBGD function) in Workbench, but to perform a LoadBGD command, it was required to go into BladeEditor and find the BladeGen file to load manually. With the Create New > Geometry feature from the BladeGen (right click menu shown below) this process is much easier now. Continue reading

Introducing ANSYS AIM for Multiphysics

ANSYS AIM MultiphysicsANSYS 16.0 delivers the first integrated and comprehensive multiphysics simulation environment designed for all engineers. This environment is called ANSYS AIM and it is the further realization of the ANSYS Workbench strategy to revolutionize engineering processes through Simulation Driven Product Development. Continue reading

CFD and Structural Meshing: Who Moved My Node?

meshing“Meshing”… Usually throwing this single word to a group of structural or CFD analysts will start interesting and passionate discussions. Meshing is definitely a key part of the simulation process and requires attention. As analysts, how many hours did we or do we spend on meshing? Probably too many —  especially if you have been in the simulation world for many years and started when automation of meshing was not so common. But after all, meshing is just one of the tools that we need to get accurate results and we should spend more time looking at simulation results than meshing our models. Continue reading

How to Apply a Harmonic Base Excitation Natively in ANSYS Mechanical Workbench 16.0

In a previous post, I have presented how to apply a harmonic base excitation in ANSYS Mechanical 15.0 using three different techniques. Among those techniques, we had the great ACT extension that has received a great attention due to its ease of use and practicality.

ANSYS 16.0 offers the capability of applying a harmonic base excitation natively, and without the need for the ACT. Acceleration applied as a base excitation uses the Enforced Motion Method. Continue reading

2015 Automotive Simulation World Congress – Call for Presentations

ASWC 2014 presentation auto safetyWhat do Tesla Motors, BMW, Honda, Toyota, Ferrari, Denso, Panasonic, SL Corporation, Cummins, Tenneco, and Honeywell, have in common? Well, not only are they leaders in the automotive renaissance, but they all delivered presentations on leading-edge simulation at the 2014 Automotive Simulation World Congress. Continue reading

Magnetoelasticity: A 20-Year Journey from Cornell to Michigan Tech to ANSYS INC.

I was reminded of Professor Francis Moon, Joseph C. Ford Professor of Engineering Emeritus, when I visited Cornell University this summer for the 2014 Engineering Development Forum. You see, 20 years earlier I had just completed my PhD dissertation in the area of magnetoelastic buckling, a topic that was initiated by Professor Moon in 1968. His breakthrough research created immense interest around magnetoelasticity in the research community. Continue reading