Building Bridges Between Design Engineers and Analysts Using Engineering Simulation Software

Many companies, large and small, have individuals or groups using powerful engineering simulation software like ANSYS Mechanicalone of our flagship products. These analysts tackle some of the most complex and challenging engineering problems for their organizations.

These same companies often also have separate teams of engineers working daily on new and evolving product designs. They are often experts in CAD modeling, using CAD-embedded simulation tools to evaluate their designs. These basic simulation tools provide some useful guidance, but often fail to provide the accurate results needed to refine and optimize designs with confidence. Consequently, many design simulations must be handed off to the relatively small number of simulation analysts using trusted simulation tools like ANSYS Mechanical. Continue reading

ANSYS 17.2 Expands Multiphysics Coupling and Interoperability

ansys 17I’m excited to announce the release of ANSYS 17.2, the latest step in our unwavering commitment to push the boundaries of engineering simulation technology, so you can solve your most difficult product development challenges faster and more cost-effectively. No one can afford to wait in today’s fast-paced business environment, and our frequent release program ensures that you have the latest simulation solutions at your fingertips as soon as possible. Our goal is to deliver the best simulation tools on the planet when you need them, which is always now, not six months from now. So let’s cut to the chase. ANSYS 17.2 delivers many new advances across the portfolio, but here are a few of my favorites. Continue reading

ANSYS Videos on the ANSYS How To Channel

ansys you tubeOver the past year and a half, our team has been creating a large number of technical ANSYS videos that focus on a variety of areas. From ANSYS Electronics to ANSYS CFX, ANSYS Fluent to ANSYS Mechanical, ANSYS SCADE, and even ANSYS Student tips for those just getting started in the art of engineering simulation.

Today, I’d like to share a few of the examples you’ll find before I send you off to explore on your own. Continue reading

Zyz Sailing Team Designs Using ANSYS

Zys sailing teamZyz sailing team started designing and manufacturing small sailing boats in 2008 to participate to Italian inter-university regattas called 1001velaCUP. During the first eight-year experience of the team, different boats have been launched, trying to optimize all different aspects that influence the final performance of a boat. R3 class rule adopted in this competition imposes geometrical and structural constrains to the design process: maximum length x beam of the boat is 4,60 x 2,10 m, while a minimum percentage weight for the hull constituted by 70% of plant-origin material is imposed. Continue reading

Advanced Mesh Morphing in ANSYS Mechanical

It is a great pleasure to guest blog for ANSYS again after my post in 2014 entitled Reshaping the Future of CFD Using Mesh Morphing. We continue to increase our commitment to deliver the high-performance mesh morphing technology of RBF Morph and began our new product project at the beginning of 2014.

We presented the first industrial applications at the Automotive Simulation World Congress in Tokyo in October 2014, and officially launched the RBF Morph ACT Extension on the market at the ANSYS Italian UGM in May 2015. At the end of 2015, we posted a free version (with limited functionality) in the ANSYS App Store. Continue reading

Seamless Integration of FKM Guideline in ANSYS Workbench with ACT

As we all know, a frequent challenge in FEM is the evaluation of stress results, in particular with cyclic stresses. The FKM guideline “Analytical Strength Assessment of Components” describes a static strength assessment as well as a fatigue strength assessment. This guideline was developed by the Advisory Board for Engineering and Research for various applications in mechanical engineering and other sectors. Continue reading

The Most Read ANSYS Blog Posts in 2015

ansys blog highlights 2015As the year winds down, I thought I’d share some of the most read ANSYS blog posts of 2015 with you. From harmonic analysis to how germs spread when you sneeze,  I hope you’ll find these choices as interesting as I did.

SPOILER ALERT: We have some REALLY cool stuff coming in 2016 that you won’t want to miss! If you haven’t subscribed to the ANSYS blog yet, please make sure you do that now.

Continue reading

Mesh Creation for Large Fabricated Structure Analysis

FEA meshed ship hull structural analysis

Many structural analysis models that use shell elements consist of a large number of bodies that need to be connected together to create a valid analysis model. These structures are typically manufactured by welding, for example ship structures.

There are a number of methods that can be used in ANSYS Mechanical for creating this type of model, which requires the geometry to be meshed and connected. Continue reading

5 Improved Workflows for Rotating Machinery Design and Analysis

There were a number of new and exciting workflow enhancements included in ANSYS 16.0 for those who design and analyze rotating machinery to make data transfers and simulation setup easier. Here are the top five enhancements:

1 – BladeGen to BladeEditor

BladeGen Continue reading

Advanced Electric Machine Design with Electromagnetic and CFD Simulations

You may have read a quick blog post at Desktop Engineering about ANSYS’s electric machine simulation capabilities. Here we dive into the technical aspects and implications of thermal simulation for electric machines.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Modern electric machines are designed to meet a wide range of applications, all facing a variety of different technical challenges. They are designed to be compact with high power densities, to have integrated power electronics, to be high-speed for higher power density, and to handle harsh environments.

These challenges all have thermal implications that affect the lifetime and performance of the electric machine and power electronics, and must be balanced with cost goals. ANSYS simulation tools, Fluent and Maxwell, can be used to predict the thermal and electromagnetic performance of these systems, and can therefore be used to optimize design choices for both thermal and cost considerations while meeting all application objectives. Continue reading