System Simulation for Model-driven Automotive Health Monitoring and Predictive Maintenance

Rather than just listing all the new capabilities for system simulation and analysis in the latest release of ANSYS Simplorer, I thought it would be interesting to share a cool example of how our systems capabilities have been applied to health monitoring of an automotive braking system. And along the way, I’ll highlight how the advancements in ANSYS 18 help our customers model and simulate systems such as these.

This example illustrates a physics-based system model intended to support health monitoring and predictive maintenance of automotive braking systems. And while this is an automotive example, our customers throughout different industries are developing similar capabilities to monitor and manage the performance of their products in operation — all in the name of improving safety, performance, and overall customer satisfaction.  Continue reading

Additive Manufacturing, Topology Optimization and 3-D Printing

Additive manufacturing (AM), topology optimization and 3-D printing have produced some remarkable changes in the manufacturing sector, enabling companies to make parts whose geometries would have been all but impossible using traditional techniques. Still, being a relatively young technology, AM faces some challenges before it can enjoy more widespread use.

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Speeding High-Tech Innovation

Since the 1960s, Dr. Gordon Moore’s prediction that computing performance will double every 12 to 18 months has held true. More recently, the gains in computing performance have been enabled by a combination of hardware and software technologies, such as multi-core, multi-threaded designs. The conveniences of the modern world — ubiquitous communication through internet-enabled phones, electronic payments and digital streaming, to name a few, are partly due to continuous engineering innovations delivered through cheaper, faster, more-precise electronics. Continue reading

Design of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems – A CPS Approach

An automobile is the biggest and most complex connected device used by consumers today. Advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) is one of the fastest growing automotive applications. Stringent government requirements on automotive safety, fuel consumption and technology-focused consumer preferences are fueling the growth of ADAS. Driven primarily by safety, ADAS capabilities were first implemented in premium vehicles as key differentiators to enhance the user experience and protect the vehicle and its occupants. It started with features like parking assistance, adaptive breaking systems (ABS), adaptive cruise control and tire pressure monitoring. Continue reading

From Drones to Connected Cars – Code Generation for Safety-Critical Embedded Software

DLR-image007Developing an Internet of Things (IoT) enabled product is a complicated task, whether it’s an autonomous vehicle, a vehicle user interface like a car infotainment system, or a connected factory. IoT-enabled products contain hundreds, if not millions, of lines of embedded software code. And many of these products — and the systems and software that control them — are mission- or safety-critical. Therefore, developers must have confidence that the software code controlling these devices is 100% accurate and responds in the intended manner. Continue reading

Connected Car Technology: Making it Safe and Reliable

Connected Car Image 01The internet has now come to the automobile, bringing connectivity for infotainment, telematics and vehicle data analytics. The connected car is rapidly becoming a key node in the emerging Internet of Things. While connected car technology is a delight for car buyers, it poses unprecedented new engineering challenges for car manufacturers of reliability, safety and security. Continue reading

Making Our Highways Safer with Automotive Radar

image002Automotive radar is a key technology in delivering active safety systems that play a major role in reducing traffic fatalities. Active safety systems include adaptive cruise control and collision warning systems with automatic steering and braking intervention, lane departure warning and electronic stability control. In a collision warning system, the automotive radar consisting of a 77 GHz transmitter emits signals that are reflected from objects ahead, at the side and to the rear of the vehicle and are captured by multiple receivers integrated throughout the vehicle. The radar system can detect and track objects and trigger a driver warning of an imminent collision and initiate electronic stability control intervention.  Continue reading

ASWC 2015 Draws Near!

After completing the first circuit of the globe, this year the Automotive Simulation World Congress (ASWC) 2015 returns to Detroit. The conference is now exactly two weeks away — to be held on June 2 and 3 — and I am really excited about it. If you haven’t registered and reserved your seat, please take a moment to register. You don’t want to miss this great event. And if you don’t know what it’s all about, read on for more information. Continue reading

Cars and Electronics in Tokyo: 2014 Automotive Simulation World Congress

This is the third year that ANSYS hosted the Automotive Simulation World Congress (ASWC), an international conference focused on engineering simulation in the ground transportation industry. The ASWC is an annual conference that rotates between the three major regions of the world. In previous blogs, I wrote about the 2012 and 2013 ASWC’s held in Detroit and Frankfurt respectively. This year the conference was held in Tokyo on October 9 and 10. Continue reading

How Can You Get More From An Oil Pump?

Imagine you have an oil pump in your car that has its outlet blocked. The pump is trying to throw the oil out but since the outlet is blocked the pressure in the pump keeps increasing. The excessive pressure that develops in the pump can be catastrophic to its strength and therefore life. This is precisely what happens when you try to operate the pump under extreme cold conditions, when the viscosity of the lubricant increases so much that the pump almost behaves as if its outlet has been blocked.

pumpsThis is a very common design scenario for pump manufacturers. Estimation of what is called as “shut-off” pressure and its implications on the structural integrity of the pump are key concepts that every pump manufacturer should bear in mind while designing pumps. Interestingly, simulations today allow manufacturers to develop deep understanding of such phenomenon and help them to design pumps, that perhaps they could not have, with just physical testing and prototyping. Continue reading