Designing Superior Turbomachinery Products

fan blades turbomachineryRotating machinery (or turbomachinery) is an application area that spans many industry segments. Each of these significantly influences the performance and efficiency of the entire system. Rotating machinery also covers a range of different scales from very large hydraulic turbines (10m diameter runner), steam and gas turbines to small automotive turbochargers that can fit roughly in the palm of our hand. Improving the performance of rotating machinery has long been realized as a crucial factor in the success of the system as a whole. Continue reading

Supercomputing Milestones via Partnerships

In a previous blog, I was expressing our privilege of having a strong HPC technology partnership with NVIDIA. Earlier this week, we announced a supercomputing milestone of scaling to 36,000 cores with fluid dynamics simulations being achieved thanks to a strategic partnership with the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Now, you may wonder what the relevance of this achievement is for you when you don’t have access to a supercomputer. Continue reading

Cars and Electronics in Tokyo: 2014 Automotive Simulation World Congress

This is the third year that ANSYS hosted the Automotive Simulation World Congress (ASWC), an international conference focused on engineering simulation in the ground transportation industry. The ASWC is an annual conference that rotates between the three major regions of the world. In previous blogs, I wrote about the 2012 and 2013 ASWC’s held in Detroit and Frankfurt respectively. This year the conference was held in Tokyo on October 9 and 10. Continue reading

Turbomachinery and Pump Symposia: Industry Consolidation

Industry consolidation was one topic of discussion as my colleague-in-turbomachinery Bill Holmes and I and recently returned from the Turbomachinery & Pump Symposia. The event is organized by the Texas A&M University Turbomachinery Laboratory and held at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston Texas. Only a few years back the pump and turbomachinery shows were separate. With the amalgamation one is now able to view a large array of impressive hardware and attend informative technical sessions applicable to the full range of equipment: pumps, compressors, turbines, fan, blowers and all related components and services. The emphasis is on Oil & Gas machinery, although not exclusively as there are synergies with power generation, chemical process, air separation etc. Continue reading

Six Myths of High-Performance Computing

six myths of high performance computingLooking back at my notes from conversations with many engineers during our recent ANSYS Convergence Conferences, I must admit that I still came across some myths and misconceptions about high-performance computing (HPC) for engineering simulation. Let me share six really striking ones with you:

  1. HPC is available on supercomputers only
  2. HPC is only useful for CFD simulations
  3. I don’t need HPC – my job is running fast enough
  4. Without internal IT support, HPC cluster adoption is undoable
  5. Parallel scalability is all about the same, right?
  6. HPC software and hardware are relative expensive

Continue reading

Using CHEMKIN Simulation Software for Complex Chemical Processes

As a new member of the ANSYS family, via the Reaction Design acquisition, I thought I would take the opportunity to give you a little background on the product line I represent — CHEMKIN.

The software had its beginnings at Sandia National Laboratories, as part of the U.S. Government’s response to the oil crisis of the 1970s. Scientists at Sandia began studying how to make more efficient, cleaner-burning engines, and they created software to simulate the complex molecular-level chemical reactions that take place during fuel combustion. In 1997, Reaction Design licensed that software from Sandia and evolved the technology into a commercial-quality software suite that enables engineers and scientists in microelectronics, combustion and chemical processing industries to develop a comprehensive understanding of chemical processes and kinetics. Continue reading

Using ANSYS for Doctorial Research in Cardiovascular Engineering

As a Marie-Curie fellow, I have obtained my PhD degree at University College London (UCL) under the supervision of Dr Vanessa Díaz. Together with twelve other Marie-Curie fellow students, I have been a member of the European project “Medical Devices and Design in Cardiovascular application” (MeDDiCA). Located in the UK, Italy, France, the Netherlands and Romania we each conducted our research in the field of cardiovascular engineering. Continue reading

Reshaping the Future of CFD Using Mesh Morphing

A cool title, isn’t it? Hello ANSYS blog readers! This is my first time in this blog as a guest blogger. You will notice a brief resume of mine together my photo as the author of this post, but let me introduce myself so that you can understand why I am here writing about mesh morphing to the ANSYS audience.

I am a Professor at University of Rome, with good experience in fluid structure interaction (FSI) and Fluent customization using UDF programming. Five years ago, driven by a Formula 1 Top Team, I developed a powerful mesh morphing tool crafted by tough specifications. Managing any kind of mesh, precise, fast and parallel! Nothing at that time was able to do this kind of job. We tried to go with (RBFs) Radial Basis Functions mesh morphing, one of the most promising techniques. And we made it. Continue reading