Upstream and Downstream of a Hyperloop Pod

If you’re a regular subscriber of the ANSYS blog, you’ve probably already heard about Elon Musk’s Hyperloop Pod Competition. Texas Guadaloop is a team from the University of Texas at Austin that was chosen to participate in this Hyperloop Design Weekend Competition back in late January among 150 other teams after SpaceX accepted our preliminary Design package.

From the beginning of our design iteration, Guadaloop has been committed to creating a simple and executable design. One of the major challenges we encountered in the external configuration of our pod design was determining the aerodynamic viability of propelling our pod through a tube. With the elimination of a compressor in our design, the Kantrowitz limit needed to be actively combated. Continue reading

10 Reasons to be Excited About ANSYS 17.0 for Turbomachinery Simulation

For the past few weeks, the ANSYS blog has published many posts and ANSYS has held a number of webinars describing the advantages that ANSYS 17.0 provides for turbomachinery simulation. In the following, I will review these events and provide my summary of 10 (out of many more) exciting developments:

  1. A focus on HPC delivers significant speedups and ability to handle larger models, for both CFD and mechanical simulation.
  2. A new mechanical model simulates journal bearings, additionally providing important inputs of stiffness and damping for rotordynamics simulation.
  3. Fracture analysis is faster and easier with arbitrary crack surface definition and post-processing.

Continue reading

Automotive Aero-Thermal Multidisciplinary Optimization Using a Common Model

ansys 17 10X engineering simulationNow, armed with the ability to perform true multidisciplinary optimization, automotive aero-thermal engineers can be 10 times more productive!

Numerous aerodynamic and thermal aspects need to be considered while designing cars, trucks and all other ground vehicles. Aerodynamic drag forces need to be studied as they affect the vehicle’s fuel efficiency; underhood component cooling needs to be managed carefully to avoid damage from the engine’s heat; aeroacoustic effects have to be calculated to reduce undesirable noise; and cabin climate control needs to be optimized for passenger comfort. CFD simulation of each of these aspects requires different models and methods. Continue reading

BadgerLoop Takes Number 3 Spot at Hyperloop Competition

badgerloop hyperloop competition ansysOur story began in the afternoon of Monday, June 15, 2015. It was just like any other day until an email with SpaceX’s announcement of a Hyperloop competition was received. We got to thinking and within a week, BadgerLoop was created purely by word of mouth. 15 students worked from around the world, while on summer internships, to solidify the core of BadgerLoop. Continue reading

Pump Simulation Problems Solved

Simulating pumps is hard!

gerotor pumpPumps, by their very nature, include moving and rotating parts so it is essential to allow this motion during the simulation. Positive displacement pumps move the fluids by mechanical action so, the need to accurately model the motion of the components increases even more. To add to that, every detail counts. Capturing tiny details such as leakages of just a few microns along with motion of the rotor makes the problem even more challenging. Continue reading

ANSYS Campus-Wide Solution Expected to Spur FIU Research Output

ANSYS team during the signing ceremony at FIURecently an ANSYS team was invited to attend a signing ceremony at Florida International University (FIU). The signing ceremony was to formalize ANSYS’ donation of a campus-wide license to FIU and to recognize the generous contribution.

The visiting team included Sin Min Yap, Vice President, Bob Helsby from the ANSYS Academic Program and Ryan Bobryk, Account Manager at ANSYS. They first toured the FlU campus visiting various research labs and departments. The team returned overawed with the fascinating research projects at FIU and shared their excitement with colleagues at ANSYS. Continue reading

Advanced Electric Machine Design with Electromagnetic and CFD Simulations

You may have read a quick blog post at Desktop Engineering about ANSYS’s electric machine simulation capabilities. Here we dive into the technical aspects and implications of thermal simulation for electric machines.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Modern electric machines are designed to meet a wide range of applications, all facing a variety of different technical challenges. They are designed to be compact with high power densities, to have integrated power electronics, to be high-speed for higher power density, and to handle harsh environments.

These challenges all have thermal implications that affect the lifetime and performance of the electric machine and power electronics, and must be balanced with cost goals. ANSYS simulation tools, Fluent and Maxwell, can be used to predict the thermal and electromagnetic performance of these systems, and can therefore be used to optimize design choices for both thermal and cost considerations while meeting all application objectives. Continue reading

Could a Car Following a Cyclist Determine the Tour de France Outcome?

This Sunday one of the most popular sporting events for tens of million people around the world begins. The Tour de France starts in Utrecht, the Netherlands. We will again see the world’s best top athletes fighting for the stage victory every day. We’ll admire them as they climb the steepest slope at an amazing speed and be impressed to see them completing a time trial at an average speed above 50 km/h. Throughout the past years, the regulations have continuously improved to guarantee a clean and fair race. As an example, during time trials, neither cars nor motorbikes are allowed in front of the cyclists as this would obviously reduce air resistance. Similarly, if a cyclist is catching up to the one ahead, they must stay on different sides of the road. However, there is no regulation to prevent a vehicle from following the athlete as it is commonly believed that a car riding behind a cyclist cannot influence him.

But is this really true?

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Aircraft Cabin Airflow: Curbing Disease Spread

For me, science and engineering has always been about designing solutions to the various problems in our everyday lives. When I began doing research in seventh grade, my very first project was a roof that converted the impact energy of precipitation into electricity to help power the home. The following year, I came up with a dynamically supportive knee brace that implements smart fluids to vary the amount of support that patients received, depending on the physical activity. Last year, I created a self-cleaning outdoor garbage bin to tackle the issue of urban sanitation in our neighborhoods.

raymond wang intel science fair winnerYet perhaps, I am best known for my most recent project, which won the 2015 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, out of 1,700 students nationally selected from 75+ countries. This year, I tackled the issue of airborne pathogen spread in aircraft cabins, generating the industry’s first high fidelity simulations of airflow inside airplane cabins. Using my insights, I engineered economically feasible solutions that altered cabin airflow patterns, creating personalized breathing zones for each individual passenger to effectively curb pathogen inhalation by up to 55 times and improve fresh air inhalation by more than 190%. Continue reading

Using ANSYS CFD to Analyze High-Lift Wing Design

Agastya ParikhFour years ago, as a high school sophomore, I began work on an independent project that explored ways to improve the performance of high-lift systems used on the Airbus A330-300. One of the biggest challenges facing me was how to best conduct experiments to assess the performance of the different designs. In prior years, I had conducted simple research on aircraft wing design and aeroelasticity using unpowered balsa models of the aircraft being tested. To employ this same method would be unworkable for the relatively complex systems of flaps and slats required by the Airbus aircraft. I would have needed to build a larger scale model or perform wind-tunnel testing — neither of which was viable because I did not have access to equipment of the complexity required. Continue reading