Serious CFD Calls for Serious CFD Software

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a tool with amazing flexibility, accuracy and breadth of application. But the tools need to be properly applied in order to deliver insight and value. Nobody starts out as an expert in CFD software. Instead, we all progress from beginners to experts over time.

For example, when I first became interested in cycling, I went shopping for a new bike. I needed something better than the old junker I was riding at the time but was a bit intimidated by cycling technology. Those small, hard saddles looked plain uncomfortable! Skinny tires! And clipless pedals were a mystery. So I ended up with a “cross” bike. Continue reading

Zyz Sailing Team Designs Using ANSYS

Zys sailing teamZyz sailing team started designing and manufacturing small sailing boats in 2008 to participate to Italian inter-university regattas called 1001velaCUP. During the first eight-year experience of the team, different boats have been launched, trying to optimize all different aspects that influence the final performance of a boat. R3 class rule adopted in this competition imposes geometrical and structural constrains to the design process: maximum length x beam of the boat is 4,60 x 2,10 m, while a minimum percentage weight for the hull constituted by 70% of plant-origin material is imposed. Continue reading

10 Simulation Advancements for Turbomachinery in ANSYS 17.0

Turbomachinery can be the most rewarding of CFD simulations. At the same time, it can be the most challenging.

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Turbomachinery covers a broad range of products including compressors, turbines (gas, hydraulic, steam, wind), turbochargers, pumps, fans and more. And turbomachinery users demand ongoing improvements, such as increased efficiency, reliability and durability while reducing emissions (for those involving combustion) and noise. Continue reading

Better, Faster CFD in ANSYS 17.0

Fidelity and accuracy is critical in CFD simulation.  After all, physical prototyping and testing can only be reduced and even replaced by CFD if one can expect accurate results. Up to now, high fidelity, high accuracy results came with a price. Complex geometries — the realistic, no holds barred type — required hours of manual effort to clean up the model and then prepare the mesh. Users were tempted to cut corners and take short cuts that sped up prep but took a toll on accuracy and fidelity. Unfortunately, there is no way of knowing just how those inaccuracies skewed the results, putting any recommendations in doubt. For example, if you don’t resolve a boundary layer correctly then any aerodynamic drag figures could be highly inaccurate. Continue reading

Predicting Equipment Fatigue Caused by Flow-Induced Vibration

Tacoma Narrows BridgeThe energy of a human voice at certain pitch and volume can shatter a wine glass due to vibrations caused by sound waves. Motion of fluids can also create structural vibration, sometimes with disastrous consequences: In 1940, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in Washington state collapsed when high winds caused the structure to oscillate with increasing amplitude from end to end, until sections of the bridge fell into the river. The bridge structure was responding to the transient forces caused at certain flow frequencies as the wind blew past the bridge. At a critical vibration frequency corresponding to the natural (or harmonic) frequency of the structure, mechanical resonance occurs, and the objects fail — glass shatters, the bridge collapses. Continue reading

Accurate Spray-Wall Interaction Predictions with ANSYS Fluent

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has become an integral part of product design and development. Today, CFD is extensively used across industries like Aerospace, Automotive, Marine, Oil and Gas, Electronics, Health care, Process and Infrastructure. While CFD tools provide detailed engineering insights and shorter product development cycles at reduced cost, CFD community is constantly working hard to improve accuracy, speed and ease of use of these tools. Complex physical phenomenon such as detailed chemistry, primary atomization, electro-chemistry, icing formation are constantly investigated and newer, better and accurate numerical models are introduced in CFD tool. Continue reading

ASWC 2015 Draws Near!

After completing the first circuit of the globe, this year the Automotive Simulation World Congress (ASWC) 2015 returns to Detroit. The conference is now exactly two weeks away — to be held on June 2 and 3 — and I am really excited about it. If you haven’t registered and reserved your seat, please take a moment to register. You don’t want to miss this great event. And if you don’t know what it’s all about, read on for more information. Continue reading

Engineers Harness the Power of the Adjoint Solver

In a previous blog, I shared with you my excitement about the power of the adjoint solver technology for shape optimization from ANSYS. Since then I have been working tirelessly to make this remarkable technology even more capable. CFD engineers can now understand their designs better and can perform smart shape optimization, all for larger problems with richer physics thanks to the adjoint solver technology.

My numerous interactions with people from all around the world confirmed what I knew: the adjoint solver technology is powerful and has the capability to enable a sea-change in the fluid design process. The technology is already having a positive disruptive impact on design, especially among the early adopters. Products are being improved. Established concepts about some types of fluid systems and how they function have been overturned. New manufacturing procedures are being attempted in order to produce the shapes indicated by the adjoint.

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Wall of Wind (WOW) at Florida International University Helps Mitigate Hurricane Damage

wall of windIn coastal areas, hurricanes can severely damage buildings, people and cause a lot of havoc. Therefore, scientists at Florida International University (FIU) are studying hurricanes and how their effects can be mitigated using the Wall of Wind (WOW). WOW is a research facility developed by FIU’s International Hurricanes Research Center (IHRC), Miami, Florida. Continue reading

Clean Diesel is Really a Three-part System

I am sure many of you have heard of clean diesel. And, probably asked yourself what is it and how is it different from regular diesel. Are we refining fuel more — why is it called clean? That is just one part of it. Clean diesel is really a three-part system. One part is cleaner fuel, the second part is improvement in the combustion — more advanced engines— and the third part is new technologies that control emission and exhaust gasses. There are different emission control technologies that can further reduce emission from the diesel engines, but most dominant are diesel particulate filters (DPF), exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC). Continue reading