Systems Engineering for Smart Products

I’ve got a lot to say about Systems Engineering for Smart Products, so this is the first in a series of blogs. In nearly every industry, consumers are benefiting from the evolution of smart products. These are highly-engineered, multi-functional products that interact with people and their environments in new ways to ensure our safety, improve efficiency or reduce energy consumption. Under the hood of every smart product is a complex system (or a series of subsystems) of micro-electronics, embedded software and advanced sensor technology that have to operate in unison to measure operating conditions, predict future events, communicate with other devices, and respond to changes faster and more accurately.

Engineering these systems into a commercially viable product is far from trivial. Today’s smart products have thousands of unique requirements that need to be served by a multiplicity of subsystems and components. Each component may have hundreds of design parameters and multiple interfaces that need to be engineered, verified and validated. The endless design dimensions present opportunities for innovation, as well as for design failures, which may result in recalls, lost revenue and a tarnished corporate brand. Continue reading

A New Model Exchange Standard – The Functional Mockup Interface

Nearly every industry today deals with issues of an increasingly complex supply chain, representing interconnected relationships between OEMs, and their Tier 1, 2 and 3 suppliers. Customers who perform simulation driven product development are acutely aware of the supply chain issues, because simulation tools used by various companies are usually different and often not interoperable. This is where standards come in — modeling standards like the IEEE VHDL-AMS language provide a clear modifiable description of behavior and all tools that support this language are expected to behave the same way. However, since each tool provides its own implementation of the language compiler (typically converting from the standard modeling language to C++ code), there can be some differences in behavior. Continue reading

2013 New Year’s Resolution: Smart Simulations

First of all, I wish everyone a Happy New Year!! With the end of the old year and start of a new one, we often begin January thinking of new year’s resolutions. I plan to take on smart simulations —  instead of the usual personal development, financing management, improving interpersonal skills, etc.

Today, while I was browsing at my local bookstore, a tag line for a book caught my eye. The author described smart people as those who “… don’t do different things, they do things differently.” In the electronics industry, the trend toward miniaturization and high power density electronics is causing concerns about thermal effect on performance, reliability and user comfort. Thus, thermal management of such systems has become an essential part of the design process to optimize performance and reliability of electronic systems. The electronics simulation community and I, over the years, have simulated many such electronic systems for thermal management. Perhaps it is now time to look back and see if we modeled and simulated them smartly. Could we have followed a better best practice on modeling thermal management of electronic systems? Ask yourself: Moving forward can we “do things differently” and use these best practices to make an impact, coming up with more innovative designs and, at the same time, being more productive? Continue reading

ANSYS Webinars, Seminars and Events This Week – Oct 29

image of Learning text on a keyboard ANSYS Webinars and EventsFrom Amsterdam to Detroit to Santa Clara and Austin, there’s a lot going on this week in the world of engineering simulation. Our Ask the Expert ANSYS webinar series continues with cyclic symmetry. A geometry is called cyclic symmetrical when a structure is rotationally symmetrical about one axis so that the full structure can be produced by copying the cyclic portion. Fan wheels, spur gears, and turbine blades are all examples of structures that exhibit cyclic symmetry. For example, a 36-blade turbine wheel assembly may have 36 repeating 10 degree segments. Continue reading

ANSYS Webinars, Seminars and Events This Week – Oct 22

image of Learning text on a keyboard ANSYS Webinars and EventsBefore I tell you about this week’s events, DID YOU KNOW that you can view past recordings of ANSYS webinars in our Resource Library? In case you missed a specific topic you’re interested in, you can also filter your results by Industry or Product. Why not catch up on all the great content our experts have put together for ANSYS users today!

While you’re there, I’d like to invite you to browse and find other technical briefs, conference papers and case studies of interest to you. If there’s something specific you’re looking for, please leave a comment on this blog post and I’ll see what I can find for you.

image of ANSYS Webinars selection process

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