ASWC 2015 Draws Near!

After completing the first circuit of the globe, this year the Automotive Simulation World Congress (ASWC) 2015 returns to Detroit. The conference is now exactly two weeks away — to be held on June 2 and 3 — and I am really excited about it. If you haven’t registered and reserved your seat, please take a moment to register. You don’t want to miss this great event. And if you don’t know what it’s all about, read on for more information. Continue reading

Bringing Systems Engineering to Universities

systems engineering academic blogWith the increase of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, or drones) in the skies, the rapid rise of robotics, and the development of embedded technologies and autonomous smart systems for the Internet of Things, small teams of engineers face bigger and bigger challenges. While it was once enough to be an expert in a single type of physics, these complex, interacting systems require modern engineers to have more knowledge of multiphysics, model-based systems engineering and embedded software than their predecessors.

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DO-178C – Aeronautics Industry Moves To New International Software Safety Regulation

Embedded software in today’s aircraft is becoming continually larger and more complex. For example, the volume of embedded software in the A300 was a few thousand lines and it is in the order of 100 million in the A380. Moreover, a sizeable part of this software is safety critical. Hence, delivering certified code is one of the critical path design elements that is growing in significance. Continue reading

2015 Automotive Simulation World Congress – Call for Presentations

ASWC 2014 presentation auto safetyWhat do Tesla Motors, BMW, Honda, Toyota, Ferrari, Denso, Panasonic, SL Corporation, Cummins, Tenneco, and Honeywell, have in common? Well, not only are they leaders in the automotive renaissance, but they all delivered presentations on leading-edge simulation at the 2014 Automotive Simulation World Congress. Continue reading

Cars and Electronics in Tokyo: 2014 Automotive Simulation World Congress

This is the third year that ANSYS hosted the Automotive Simulation World Congress (ASWC), an international conference focused on engineering simulation in the ground transportation industry. The ASWC is an annual conference that rotates between the three major regions of the world. In previous blogs, I wrote about the 2012 and 2013 ASWC’s held in Detroit and Frankfurt respectively. This year the conference was held in Tokyo on October 9 and 10. Continue reading

Capturing Wind Energy Safely

Capturing wind energy is full of technical challenges but it also requires a high level of safety. The turbines must operate under harsh conditions, they must be highly reliable, and they must be safe.

Vestas develops wind turbines and is the leader in its domain. It has installed 56 GW of wind energy, which amounts to 40,000 turbines. They generate enough clean energy to power 19 million European households. Continue reading

Get Ready for Mobility with SCADE

In my last blog, I talked about the ability to control human–machine interfaces (HMIs) through mobile devices. The SCADE model-based embedded software suite features the automatic, one-click, generation of HMI executable applications from a single model over a variety of targets, including Android or iOS tablets and other similar devices. Here’s how it all comes together.

The code generated out of SCADE models is fundamentally independent from the target platform ― whether it is the hardware and associated drivers or the operating system ― as no system calls are being performed in this generated code. The portability of SCADE HMI models as executable applications is, thus, greatly facilitated, as the needs for adaptation then reside only in the main execution and interaction loops, or in the windowing system management. The always-wider adoption of international standards like OpenGL (for drawings) EGL (as the associated windowing system) also facilitates this task. Continue reading

The New Frontier of Embedded Software Cont’d

Continuing from my post yesterday about the new frontier of embedded software.

Nowadays it is not enough to just fly the plane, pilots have to manage tons of information while flying and they are connected with  other units on the battlefield through a network that allows real time co-ordination.

image of the F-104 Starfighter Cockpit

F-104 Starfighter Cockpit

image of Lockheed Martin F22A Raptor Cockpit

Lockheed Martin F22A Raptor Cockpit

Have you seen the cockpit of a new generation aircraft? Google the F-22 or the F-35 and compare them with the one from an F-104;  you will not recognize a single piece of equipment. Head to YouTube and enjoy a video showing the maneuverability of one of these modern airplanes. Amazing!

Today simulation is widely used, aerodynamics is now explored in detail so engineers can master all the phenomena that affect the flight even in extreme conditions, and new configurations allow these aircraft to challenge physics laws… and win!!  I’ve seen a Eurofighter Typhoon during a test flight operate at 80 knots and at no more than 100 feet from the runway — almost still in the air — flying with an angle of attack of 60 degrees. This could have been considered science fiction by an F-104 pilot.  I’m amazed by the maneuverability of the F-22 or what an SU37 can do. I’m always impressed and fascinated with how aircraft designers created these masterpieces of engineering. Continue reading