General Fusion Developing World’s First Commercially Viable Fusion Power Plant for Clean Energy

Energy supply is one of the world’s biggest challenges. Fusion technology has the potential to solve this challenge by providing on-demand, safe and clean energy that will combat climate change while driving economic growth. Drawing on decades of advancements in plasma physics, materials engineering and computer simulation, General Fusion is working to develop the world’s first commercially viable fusion power plant.

What Makes the General Fusion System Different?
Developing a completely new form of energy comes with plenty of challenges and unknowns, so General Fusion utilizes milestone-driven R&D campaigns and ANSYS simulation solutions to reduce the risk in its development process. One such campaign focused on testing the liquid metal compression technology that forms the core of General Fusion’s power plant. Continue reading

The Evolution of Simulation and Rotating Machinery

It seems not all that long ago that I first attended the ASME International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) conference in Toronto. It was just a short drive from my office in Waterloo, Ontario. This year I took a much longer trip to Seoul South Korea to attend the ASME Turbo Expo. As I am already engaged in preparations for the 2017 edition that will be held in Charlotte, NC, I am reminded that much has changed in how rotating machinery is designed and operated. No doubt more evolution will be evident in the 2017 conference. One difference is that the conference will be held in conjunction with the ASME Power and Energy conference. I think that this makes a lot of sense, given the continued important role of turbomachinery in power and energy production and transmission. Continue reading

AirLoom Energy On Track to Replace Wind Turbine Using Simulation

AirLoom Energy (from left to right): Mookwon Seo (engineer), Olivia Lim (engineer), Robert Lumley (president), Blossom Ko (operations). Additional staff (not pictured): Lance Goode (systems administrator), Josh Hamblin (engineer)

AirLoom Energy (from left to right): Mookwon Seo (engineer), Olivia Lim (engineer), Robert Lumley (president), Blossom Ko (operations). Additional staff (not pictured): Lance Goode (systems administrator), Josh Hamblin (engineer)

Breakthrough energy innovation comes in many forms, as we at AirLoom Energy are proving with our revolutionary design of an alternative to the wind turbine. AirLoom Energy is a startup wind energy company housed at the incubator program (WTBC) at the University of Wyoming, home of the Cowboys football team and big, BIG wind. We were recently awarded an SBIR grant from the National Science Foundation to support the prototype development of our novel AirLoom wind power generation technology, a milestone that can be credited in large part to support received through the ANSYS Startup program. Continue reading

Could Innovation and Engineering Cause Dropping Oil Prices?

The recent drop in oil prices naturally has produced economic winners and losers, and price speculators and pundits are lining up conventional producers against those behind American-drilled Shale oil. Yet, questions remain about how the world is over-supplied with oil only a few years after we supposedly passed peek oil and survived oil prices topping $140 per barrel. Discounting the anticipated demand softness due to economic activities in Europe and Asia, technology is playing a strong role in finding, producing and using energy across the full range of industrial activities. Continue reading

Harnessing Energy Through Simulation

Maybe you’ve never thought about it, but we are living on a spaceship called Earth. It’s a big one, with more than 7 billion people on board, traveling at about 108,000 Km/h (67,500 mph) in the solar system, while spinning in such a way that, if you are on the equator line, you are moving at more than 1,700 Km/h (1,000 mph). Amazing, isn’t it?

image of ozone hole NASA

The ozone hole max is on Sept. 22, 2012. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

In our travel through the universe, we are protected from outer space by our pressurized canopy: a 12 Km-thick barrier limited by an ozone layer that acts as a shield against radiation and small asteroids. It also allows us to breathe fresh air. It’s a very complex ship, with systems designed to provide the passengers (us) with anything we need to have a very pleasant journey: food, energy, water and fun. But it was designed 4.5 billion years ago, and there were no human beings at that time asking for so much energy to cool down their houses in summer, heat them up in winter, drive a big car, fly in a plane, or produce goods.

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This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology News Articles

Happy Friday Saturday, folks! This week’s roundup of interesting engineering technology news articles looks at some great gifts to buy the engineer in your life, a potential new way to power the US in the future and Boeing’s latest simulator technology.

Enjoy!

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