Adjoint Solver Methods for CFD Analysis

When I first encountered adjoint methods as a post-doctoral researcher at NASA, I could see that there was enormous potential in this approach. It was only after joining Fluent, and subsequently ANSYS, that the time was right to develop an adjoint solver for anyone using simulation, not just for those using in-house codes. Given that there were many, many users of ANSYS computational fluid dynamics simulation tools, there was a clear opportunity to deploy this technology globally and impact the design process positively for a lot of organizations. This compelled our adjoint solver project team to overcome some of the significant technical challenges in developing this technology. It was a tough road, but the results have made it all worthwhile.

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In this example, the adjoint solver indicates how to modify the shape of this Formula 1 aileron to generate maximum down force.

The adjoint solver calculates sensitivity information for a fluid system. The flow problem is solved in the usual manner. Then the user selects some measure of performance of the system as being of particular interest. The drag or downforce on a car and pressure drop in an internal flow system are common examples. The adjoint solver is run in a manner quite similar to the flow solver. A wide variety of sensitivity data is generated, including the sensitivity of the result of interest to the geometric shape of the system. For many people this type of result needs to be seen to be believed, at which point disbelief turns to delight. Continue reading

ANSYS Congratulates the Emirates Team New Zealand

emirates team new zealand

Courtesy Emirates Team New Zealand

ANSYS congratulates Emirates Team New Zealand for winning the Louis Vuitton Cup for the second time!

Never heard of the Louis Vuitton Cup sailing race? You may have heard of the America’s Cup, the oldest active trophy in international sport. If you haven’t, the America’s Cup is a sailing race where a challenger yacht races one-to-one against the current holder of the America’s Cup. The challenger team has earns this position by winning the Louis Vuitton Cup. Continue reading

Wind Sway and the Tokyo ANSYS Convergence Meeting

In June, I had the pleasure and privilege to present at the Tokyo ANSYS Convergence User Group meeting. Presenting highlights of the ANSYS fluid dynamics solution to more than 1,200 attendees was exhilarating! But since many of you may have attended these events, I won’t do a repeat of the presentation here. Instead, i will share my visit to the
TokyoTreeTower

Tokyo SkyTree tower, that city’s new TV tower. The old Tokyo Tower was too small to transmit digital TV signals, since many high rises obstructed its line of sight. Therefore, the SkyTree tower was built and measures 634 meters high, which is 301 meters higher than the old Tokyo Tower. It is also the tallest tower in the world and the second tallest structure, just behind the Burj Khalifa.

While visiting, I overheard a couple asking each other if a violent wind could sway the tower. The answer, thanks to clever architecture, is that it will not. (I could have told them this answer, but who would trust me!) How could a 650 meters thin tower not sway in the wind? The answer is in the core design. Continue reading

Canadian Ingenuity Reduces Risk of Powerhouse Flooding

In Canada, we are proud to contribute to reducing the global carbon footprint by exploiting renewable energy sources that are readily available, like hydropower. However, it is important to manage this resource responsibly and cost effectively by reducing risk of failure and increasing efficiency. Using fluid dynamics, structural mechanics and thermal analysis, Kawa Engineering Ltd. delivers a broad range of services to the hydropower industry (as well as others) to allow customers to design and test many parts of these facilities before they are built. As part of celebrating Canadian Engineering Month, here’s a recent interesting project that developed a location for a powerhouse.

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3-D geometry used for flood analysis. Elevations are relative to sea level.

We used engineering simulation to help locate the powerhouse close to a waterfall but in a spot with minimal flood risk. If flooding occurred in the powerhouse, it would be extremely costly. Finding a proper location also means that there is decreased need for additional components to protect electrical equipment (generator, turbine, switch box, etc.) if flooding occurs; it determines the cut and fill required for construction; and lessens construction resources. Continue reading

ANSYS Hall of Fame Class of 2013

The 2013 ANSYS Hall of Fame competition is now complete — this year with a record-breaking 134 entries. The annual ANSYS Hall of Fame Competition determines the most eye-popping simulation images and videos from our customers, showcasing how they use ANSYS to realize their product promise. We’d like to thank all of those who shared their great work.

Editors Note: We’ll be sharing more of our submissions over the coming weeks on our ANSYS Facebook page.

Without further ado…we are pleased to announce this year’s ANSYS Hall of Fame: Continue reading

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and ANSYS Part II

image of Katherine Bradley and Swaminathan Subbiah

Katherine Bradley discusses unmanned aerial vehicles with Swaminathan Subbiah from ANSYS

“Designing unmanned aerial vehicles has many technical challenges, on the fluid dynamics side as well as the software control side,” remarked Swaminathan Subbiah, the vice president of corporate product and market strategy at ANSYS. In my last blog, I talked about unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and their use in reconnaissance in the military and commercial applications in industry. I also touched on how ANSYS software solved some engineering problems of UAVs. To find out how ANSYS was involved, I interviewed Suti Wirogo, the senior technical account manager, and Rob Harwood, the aerospace and defense Industry marketing director, both at ANSYS. We all sat down one rainy Friday afternoon to discuss the challenges of UAVs and how ANSYS can help to solve the devices’ engineering challengers. Continue reading

ANSYS Helps Speedo Make a Splash (Well less actually!)

Here at ANSYS, we’ve been anxiously awaiting the moment we would tell the world that Speedo® used ANSYS CFD at their Aqualab® to once again create leading-edge swimwear, equipment and apparel under their Fastskin Racing System® line. Yesterday morning, the press release hit the wire.

I remember very clearly the 2008 article that described the use of CFD to improve swimsuit performance, published in our ANSYS Advantage Magazine. These suits were quite the success in the 2008 Olympics! At the time, I thought that nothing more could be done with swimwear, that this was the final evolution in the area of high-performance swimsuits.

How wrong I was! The 2008 suit would not be the final evolution, it would be the beginning of a series of innovations. The newest Speedo development is, in fact, a system that comprises a choice of 19 products, including caps, goggles and suits, allowing swimmers to select the best combination to meet their preferences and performance needs. Continue reading

Confidence By Design ANSYS Workshops

I expect you’ve seen umpteen emails about Confidence by Design ANSYS workshops being held in different cities North America during May and June. I’m taking this moment to share some photos and information from our event held May 8, 2012, in Minneapolis. And, to remind you that you can attend similar events that are coming up: June 5 in Detroit, June 14 in Chicago and June 20 in Houston.

ANSYS Workshops

image of welcome signThese events have been designed to provide more of a technical deep dive and to show how you can use ANSYS tools to realize your product promise with confidence; hence the name, Confidence by Design. (Even as a long-time ANSYS employee, I learned something new from the material provided.) The agendas are tailored to meet the needs of the local customer base. For example, Detroit offers an automotive, focus whereas the Minneapolis workshop was focused for the healthcare industry. Continue reading