Learn About the Many Innovative Features of ANSYS 18

I’m excited and honored to share with you the innovations in the latest release of our suite of simulation solutions, ANSYS 18, on behalf of over a thousand R&D professionals at ANSYS. The driving force for these innovations is the spread of simulation to all areas of engineering practice, a trend we call “pervasive engineering simulation.”

This trend is enabling engineers to explore the design parameter space earlier in the product lifecycle (digital exploration), test thousands of detailed designs rapidly and efficiently (digital prototyping), and monitor and optimize their product’s operation after it has been deployed (using digital twins).

To make pervasive engineering simulation as easy as possible for all engineers, we’ve added a lot of new features to each product family, as you can see below. For more information on ANSYS 18, including demo videos, webcasts, application briefs and technical papers, see our ANSYS 18 web pages. Continue reading

Get Up to Speed with ANSYS Training Options to #LearnANSYS

For over 40 years, ANSYS training has been a reliable partner for engineers to increase their productive use of ANSYS software. With tight deadlines and demanding product design requirements moving CAE engineers into the spotlight, engineers are feeling the pressure to deliver accurate predictions of product performance in a timely manner, often times before a product is even built.

Project and product success ultimately hinges on the preparedness of the engineering team to perform the simulations necessary to support key engineering decisions. In an environment of evolving demands it is becoming a high priority for engineers to keep their skills current. Successful engineers therefore focus on learning more in order to stay on top and to move ahead. Continue reading

Concept to Optimization with Upfront Simulation

Do you wish you had a way to build and test your ideas virtually before investing in physical prototypes? An easy, accurate method that accelerates design timelines and reduces costs?

We all have ideas. Product designers strive to come up with ideas for innovative products. In the modern era, most products are not simple and must fulfill multiple functions in addition to being cost-effective and stylish. A good idea for a product often means understanding how a thousand smaller ideas work together to create the whole. Unfortunately, it is expensive to physically test every idea or many versions of the best one. Fortunately, upfront simulation helps engineers optimize their product idea before building the first physical prototype. Attend our webinar to see how. Continue reading

Zyz Sailing Team Designs Using ANSYS

Zys sailing teamZyz sailing team started designing and manufacturing small sailing boats in 2008 to participate to Italian inter-university regattas called 1001velaCUP. During the first eight-year experience of the team, different boats have been launched, trying to optimize all different aspects that influence the final performance of a boat. R3 class rule adopted in this competition imposes geometrical and structural constrains to the design process: maximum length x beam of the boat is 4,60 x 2,10 m, while a minimum percentage weight for the hull constituted by 70% of plant-origin material is imposed. Continue reading

Why 10x More HPC Matters?

hpc scalibilityIn my talks with engineering managers, flow analysts and IT staff, I often hear variants of this question. Why is more computing power a strategic asset for my engineering department? Why does scalability matter for my simulation jobs that don’t go beyond 32–64 cores in parallel? What’s in it for IT when we are stuck with our current HPC server or cluster for at least two years? Let me try to answer each of these questions.
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Pay-Per-Use Licensing for Cloud Computing

ansys elastic licensingWhile considering a switch to the cloud, many of you may wonder how ANSYS licensing will work there, and more in particular, when and how we will support a pay-per-use model. I have very good news for you. Along with your existing licenses, you can use our newly announced ANSYS Elastic LicensingTM. This is a new pay-per-use licensing model unlocking virtually every ANSYS product that is supported on cloud-hosting partner hardware. Continue reading

Taking Laminar-Turbulent Transition Modeling to the Next Level

Flows around aerodynamic bodies, like aircraft wings, helicopter blades, wind turbines and turbomachinery components develop boundary layers that, to a large extent, define their performance. The boundary layers can either be laminar or turbulent depending on numerous factors, like Reynolds number, freestream turbulence levels and surface roughness, to name a few. Understanding which type of boundary layer is present, and the location of the laminar-to-turbulent transition point under varying operating conditions, is essential for accurate predictions of the performance of aerodynamic devices. Continue reading

Advanced Electric Machine Design with Electromagnetic and CFD Simulations

You may have read a quick blog post at Desktop Engineering about ANSYS’s electric machine simulation capabilities. Here we dive into the technical aspects and implications of thermal simulation for electric machines.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Electric machine geometry with cooling and integrated power electronics.

Modern electric machines are designed to meet a wide range of applications, all facing a variety of different technical challenges. They are designed to be compact with high power densities, to have integrated power electronics, to be high-speed for higher power density, and to handle harsh environments.

These challenges all have thermal implications that affect the lifetime and performance of the electric machine and power electronics, and must be balanced with cost goals. ANSYS simulation tools, Fluent and Maxwell, can be used to predict the thermal and electromagnetic performance of these systems, and can therefore be used to optimize design choices for both thermal and cost considerations while meeting all application objectives. Continue reading

Aircraft Cabin Airflow: Curbing Disease Spread

For me, science and engineering has always been about designing solutions to the various problems in our everyday lives. When I began doing research in seventh grade, my very first project was a roof that converted the impact energy of precipitation into electricity to help power the home. The following year, I came up with a dynamically supportive knee brace that implements smart fluids to vary the amount of support that patients received, depending on the physical activity. Last year, I created a self-cleaning outdoor garbage bin to tackle the issue of urban sanitation in our neighborhoods.

raymond wang intel science fair winnerYet perhaps, I am best known for my most recent project, which won the 2015 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, out of 1,700 students nationally selected from 75+ countries. This year, I tackled the issue of airborne pathogen spread in aircraft cabins, generating the industry’s first high fidelity simulations of airflow inside airplane cabins. Using my insights, I engineered economically feasible solutions that altered cabin airflow patterns, creating personalized breathing zones for each individual passenger to effectively curb pathogen inhalation by up to 55 times and improve fresh air inhalation by more than 190%. Continue reading

A Brave New World – What It Will Take to Realize the Hyperloop Dream

Hyperloop – Elon Musk’s project, now venture-capital-backed, to shuttle passengers between cities via tubes at the speed of sound — is shaping up to be to the 21st century what the railroad was to the 19th century.

Both are visionary: one connected the coasts and permitted safe travel across the continent and the other could provide super-fast, efficient commuter passage between major cities. Both were rejected initially as the stuff of fiction: too theoretical to work, too expensive to build. Both were aided by the technology of their day, railways by the might of the industrial revolution, Hyperloop by the computer and simulation technology. And both, when the history of the 21st century finally is written, will be seen as revolutionary turning points in modes of transportation. Continue reading