Cloud Computing Best Practices for Engineering Simulation Pt.2

In the first part of this two-part post, I already addressed four of the eight cloud computing best practices that are fundamentally related to simulation data and end-user access. Now I’ll address best practices that are associated with licensing, HPC workloads, and business support for cloud deployments. Continue reading

Cloud Computing Best Practices for Engineering Simulation

cloud computing engineering simulation best practicesRapid growth in the use of engineering simulation tools – and in the demand for high performance computing (HPC) – is driving interest in cloud computing. Using the cloud for simulation presents unique challenges with different solution types required for specific use-cases. For many years, I have been on this journey with customers adopting cloud computing. Quite a few of them has been enabled through the UberCloud project. Let me share some lessons learned and key takeaways. I will basically do that by means of eight “best practices”: Continue reading

Why 10x More HPC Matters?

hpc scalibilityIn my talks with engineering managers, flow analysts and IT staff, I often hear variants of this question. Why is more computing power a strategic asset for my engineering department? Why does scalability matter for my simulation jobs that don’t go beyond 32–64 cores in parallel? What’s in it for IT when we are stuck with our current HPC server or cluster for at least two years? Let me try to answer each of these questions.
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10 Reasons to be Excited About ANSYS 17.0 for Turbomachinery Simulation

For the past few weeks, the ANSYS blog has published many posts and ANSYS has held a number of webinars describing the advantages that ANSYS 17.0 provides for turbomachinery simulation. In the following, I will review these events and provide my summary of 10 (out of many more) exciting developments:

  1. A focus on HPC delivers significant speedups and ability to handle larger models, for both CFD and mechanical simulation.
  2. A new mechanical model simulates journal bearings, additionally providing important inputs of stiffness and damping for rotordynamics simulation.
  3. Fracture analysis is faster and easier with arbitrary crack surface definition and post-processing.

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Pay-Per-Use Licensing for Cloud Computing

ansys elastic licensingWhile considering a switch to the cloud, many of you may wonder how ANSYS licensing will work there, and more in particular, when and how we will support a pay-per-use model. I have very good news for you. Along with your existing licenses, you can use our newly announced ANSYS Elastic LicensingTM. This is a new pay-per-use licensing model unlocking virtually every ANSYS product that is supported on cloud-hosting partner hardware. Continue reading

10X Faster Insight for Structural Analysis

ansys 17 10X engineering simulationIf you’ve heard anything about ANSYS 17.0, it’s that it is faster than ever. Faster solvers, faster processing, greater core counts — it all sounds great, doesn’t it? Everyone wants to get their work done faster, and faster is better than slower, isn’t it? But what exactly does “faster” mean to engineers performing structural analysis simulations today? Continue reading

What Happens in the Cloud, Stays in the Cloud… AWS re:Invent

A quick look back at AWS re:Invent 2015

image002Credit for the title belongs to Pam Murphy, COO of Infor, who delivered this gem in the keynote session of the Global Partner Summit at Amazon Web Services (AWS) re:Invent 2015 conference, held in Las Vegas from Oct. 6-9. If you had any doubts that cloud computing is gaining steam (apologies for mixing water vapor metaphors) attending this event would have ended them. Over 18,000 attendees were at the main conference and about 4,000 attended the Partner Summit (ANSYS is an AWS Advanced Technology Partner). Continue reading

Automated Design System Speeds Pump Development

Advanced simulation tools are essential for contemporary and competitive product design. But it is the assembly of these tools into an effective, automated design system that gives leading companies an additional advantage. One such company is Denmark-based Grundfos, one of the world’s leading pump manufacturers.
P_FEA_model

Grundfos estimates that pumps currently account for 10 percent of the world’s total electricity consumption. This fact provides ample incentive to improve pump efficiency, given the current drive for energy efficiency and reduction in carbon emissions. Grundfos produces pumps for a wide range of applications: circulator pumps for the heating, ventilating and air conditioning industry as well as pumps for water supply, sewage, boiler, and other industrial applications and for inclusion in the equipment of other OEM’s. With such a broad line of products, it is clear that there is plenty of potential for putting an automated design loop system to work. Continue reading

Brain Simulation

While reading “Out of Our Minds” by Sir Ken Robinson —published in 2003 — one prediction that blew my mind was the possibilities of backing up our brain information. It was not convincing, even considering some forty odd years into the future. I did a Google Search to discover that actually the book quoted a prediction by renowned futurologist Dr. Ian Pearson.

“By about 2040, there will be a backup of our brains in a computer somewhere, so that when you die it won’t be a major career problem.” – Ian Pearson

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Moore’s Law Might Be Slowing Down, But Not Software Scalability

Based on a recent announcement that ANSYS and Cray has smashed supercomputing records, an editor of a well-known magazine followed up on and asked me whether this achievement might help to compensate the slowdown of Moore’s Law. Although I was able to briefly respond, it was also end of the day and while driving home the question stayed in my head and was the origin of this blog. Continue reading