Simulation Innovations: From Systems Simulation to Autonomous Vehicles to Digital Twins

The role of 3-D physics, systems simulation and embedded software is expanding rapidly into new industries and disciplines. A few years ago, 3-D physics simulation was limited to specific departments within organizations, and often these departments did not coordinate with each other on product development activities. Fast forward to today, and much has changed and must continue to evolve in order for companies to remain competitive in the changing landscape of product development. Integrated 3-D physics, systems simulation and embedded software tools are of the utmost importance — especially when tackling the challenges of quickly and accurately developing the technology driving digital twins and autonomous vehicles.

Join us in Paris for our Innovations Conference on December 5-6 and learn how our customers are using simulation to bring their products to market faster.

Continue reading

Digital Twin of a Motor and Pump System – Second Edition

About a year ago, my colleague, Eric Bantegnie, wrote a blog that described how we, along with our partners PTC, NI and HPE, had created a digital twin of a pump and one of its valves. We showcased this at PTC LiveWorx. I’m happy to announce that work continues with our partners on a new and expanded version of the digital twin of this pump and its valves to its motor and electric drive.

Why is this exciting and important? This enhanced digital twin demonstrates a multi-domain system including fluids, electromechanical, electromagnetics and thermal  aspects, coupled with a user friendly Human Machine Interface (HMI),  to solve a challenging problem that faces motor designers and operators — determining, monitoring and maintaining the optimal temperature at which to operate the motor and its components on a consistent basis. Why does this matter? Every 10 degree Celsius increase in operating temperature of the motor and components over their optimum temperatures decreases the life of the motor by half! Continue reading

Speeding High-Tech Innovation

Since the 1960s, Dr. Gordon Moore’s prediction that computing performance will double every 12 to 18 months has held true. More recently, the gains in computing performance have been enabled by a combination of hardware and software technologies, such as multi-core, multi-threaded designs. The conveniences of the modern world — ubiquitous communication through internet-enabled phones, electronic payments and digital streaming, to name a few, are partly due to continuous engineering innovations delivered through cheaper, faster, more-precise electronics. Continue reading

The Changing Landscape of IoT Product Design

The Gartner Hype Cycle charts are a peek into the future. They graphically project where various technology trends are along a maturity timeline. The most recent Hype Cycle identifies several megatrends, including digital business technologies and new design and innovation approaches, such as IoT product design.

Continue reading

Antenna Design Workflow with ANSYS 17.2

antenna-designAntennas are the lifeblood of connected, mobile and many emerging IoT products. Consumers expect a reliable connection every time; anything short can kill a product launch or, worse yet, tarnish a corporate brand. That’s the market reality. The engineering reality is that there are significant engineering challenges associated with designing antennas and radio systems, including providing reliable connectivity and maintaining reasonable performance within an ever shrinking design footprint. Many of today’s devices need to operate in an increasingly crowded radio spectrum with the possibility of co-site conditions, operation near the human body and other challenging installed environments. Continue reading

ANSYS Advantage Connects You to IoT

ANSYS Advantage IoTEvery day we hear about a new internet-enabled product — or two, or three, or a dozen. Consumer products are increasingly more connected including appliances, automobiles and traditional electronics like smartphones and tablets. In the industrial world, factories, aircraft, distribution facilities, power plants and many other things are being monitored by sensors and communications networks to provide feedback on production, maintenance and efficiency. Importantly, these devices collect data that allow manufacturers to understand how products are used so that they can develop better things that more closely fit our needs. Engineers designing smart, connected products need to address competing and complex challenges, including size, weight, power, performance, reliability, durability. For example, engineers may need to design reliable sensors, high-speed communication and networking equipment, or supercomputers that process vast amounts of data. How can designers ensure that their products will work flawlessly in the real world? Continue reading

Creating a Digital Twin of a Pump

Read any industry publication today and the Internet of Things (IoT) is a hot topic.Talk about how products will be connected to each other and interact with users on different levels is everywhere. But is all of this really  possible? Will we see this type of connectivity and interaction any time soon? Gartner, the technology research company, says that there will be 6.4 billion connected devices this year, and many of these will be in the industrial sector. What advantage does this connectivity bring — digital twins, predictive maintenance and predictive analytics. Continue reading

ANSYS and Carnegie Mellon University Partner to Drive Industry 4.0

CMU PR logoThe best thing we can do for today’s college students is to prepare them for the real-world challenges they will face upon graduation. For engineering students, ANSYS has long been involved in this process through internships, co-op education opportunities, and promoting the use of our software solutions as learning tools in undergraduate and graduate courses at universities around the world. Today we are excited to be taking another big step along this path by announcing a very special partnership with Carnegie Mellon University and its College of Engineering. Continue reading

From Drones to Connected Cars – Code Generation for Safety-Critical Embedded Software

DLR-image007Developing an Internet of Things (IoT) enabled product is a complicated task, whether it’s an autonomous vehicle, a vehicle user interface like a car infotainment system, or a connected factory. IoT-enabled products contain hundreds, if not millions, of lines of embedded software code. And many of these products — and the systems and software that control them — are mission- or safety-critical. Therefore, developers must have confidence that the software code controlling these devices is 100% accurate and responds in the intended manner. Continue reading

Internet of Things – Making Wireless Happen

internet of things wireless office antennaWireless communication is changing our world. The number and density of antennas in our immediate surroundings have exploded, and are increasing every day. There are literally hundreds of antennas in a typical home and thousands in an office building. Driven by the demands of the Internet of Things, along with autonomous vehicles and electrification initiatives in the aerospace sector, more antennas are required to be integrated into our devices to make all of this wireless interconnectivity possible. Continue reading