Canadian Ingenuity Reduces Risk of Powerhouse Flooding

In Canada, we are proud to contribute to reducing the global carbon footprint by exploiting renewable energy sources that are readily available, like hydropower. However, it is important to manage this resource responsibly and cost effectively by reducing risk of failure and increasing efficiency. Using fluid dynamics, structural mechanics and thermal analysis, Kawa Engineering Ltd. delivers a broad range of services to the hydropower industry (as well as others) to allow customers to design and test many parts of these facilities before they are built. As part of celebrating Canadian Engineering Month, here’s a recent interesting project that developed a location for a powerhouse.

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3-D geometry used for flood analysis. Elevations are relative to sea level.

We used engineering simulation to help locate the powerhouse close to a waterfall but in a spot with minimal flood risk. If flooding occurred in the powerhouse, it would be extremely costly. Finding a proper location also means that there is decreased need for additional components to protect electrical equipment (generator, turbine, switch box, etc.) if flooding occurs; it determines the cut and fill required for construction; and lessens construction resources. Continue reading

This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology News Articles

Happy Friday Saturday, folks! This week’s roundup of interesting engineering technology news articles looks at some great gifts to buy the engineer in your life, a potential new way to power the US in the future and Boeing’s latest simulator technology.

Enjoy!

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Influencing Efficient Wind Energy Generation

Wind power can be a source of cheap, renewable energy when it is captured and used efficiently. From a business perspective, engineering simulation technology contributes to wind energy viability by influencing efficient generation, which can impact design, manufacturing, site selection, farm layout, deployment and operation.

The industry continually innovates to meet growing complexities for both onshore and offshore wind turbines. The combination of cost and weight reduction requirements, coupled with reliability and economic considerations, puts additional demand on engineering design and processes. The benefits of engineering simulation include better understanding of components and system-level performance, which deals with both components and systems and covers fluids, structure, electronic, acoustics, composites, transmission, seismic, fatigue and thermal analysis and design.

Sample results from a CFD simulation of wind turbine blade – shows flow stream lines. Courtesy IMPSA.

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