Data-Based Model-based System Engineering: Interface Control Documents Management with ANSYS SCADE System

“A picture is worth a thousand words.” Pictures, or model-based designs, as engineers refer to them, provide a natural means of communication. With the newest release of ANSYS SCADE System 15.2, systems engineers can use models and interface control documents (ICDs), rather than text files and long lists of data, to create and manage their systems designs.

However, when precision and complexity come forth, “data dictionaries” enter the game. A dictionary is a way to manage information in an exhaustive way but without the model, it’s not easy to get an overview of your system. The issue you’re then faced with is the consistency between the model and the dictionaries — if inconsistent, the situation is worse than without the model. Continue reading

Deploying Model-Based Systems Engineering within the Enterprise

systems engineering imageToday’s blog post is a continuation of a series on Systems Engineering for Smart Products. In my previous posting, I described how traditional systems engineering has evolved to model-based systems engineering (MBSE), in which the authoritative system definition no longer resides in a set of static text-based design documents, but rather in a dynamic model.

While the benefits of MBSE have been extensively documented, there has been little guidance on how to successfully deploy MBSE within an engineering enterprise. Through engagements with many A&D, automotive and energy companies, we have identified the following success factors. Continue reading

Systems Engineering for Smart Products

I’ve got a lot to say about Systems Engineering for Smart Products, so this is the first in a series of blogs. In nearly every industry, consumers are benefiting from the evolution of smart products. These are highly-engineered, multi-functional products that interact with people and their environments in new ways to ensure our safety, improve efficiency or reduce energy consumption. Under the hood of every smart product is a complex system (or a series of subsystems) of micro-electronics, embedded software and advanced sensor technology that have to operate in unison to measure operating conditions, predict future events, communicate with other devices, and respond to changes faster and more accurately.

Engineering these systems into a commercially viable product is far from trivial. Today’s smart products have thousands of unique requirements that need to be served by a multiplicity of subsystems and components. Each component may have hundreds of design parameters and multiple interfaces that need to be engineered, verified and validated. The endless design dimensions present opportunities for innovation, as well as for design failures, which may result in recalls, lost revenue and a tarnished corporate brand. Continue reading

A New Model Exchange Standard – The Functional Mockup Interface

Nearly every industry today deals with issues of an increasingly complex supply chain, representing interconnected relationships between OEMs, and their Tier 1, 2 and 3 suppliers. Customers who perform simulation driven product development are acutely aware of the supply chain issues, because simulation tools used by various companies are usually different and often not interoperable. This is where standards come in — modeling standards like the IEEE VHDL-AMS language provide a clear modifiable description of behavior and all tools that support this language are expected to behave the same way. However, since each tool provides its own implementation of the language compiler (typically converting from the standard modeling language to C++ code), there can be some differences in behavior. Continue reading