Using ANSYS CFD to Analyze High-Lift Wing Design

Agastya ParikhFour years ago, as a high school sophomore, I began work on an independent project that explored ways to improve the performance of high-lift systems used on the Airbus A330-300. One of the biggest challenges facing me was how to best conduct experiments to assess the performance of the different designs. In prior years, I had conducted simple research on aircraft wing design and aeroelasticity using unpowered balsa models of the aircraft being tested. To employ this same method would be unworkable for the relatively complex systems of flaps and slats required by the Airbus aircraft. I would have needed to build a larger scale model or perform wind-tunnel testing — neither of which was viable because I did not have access to equipment of the complexity required. Continue reading

Designing Superior Turbomachinery Products

fan blades turbomachineryRotating machinery (or turbomachinery) is an application area that spans many industry segments. Each of these significantly influences the performance and efficiency of the entire system. Rotating machinery also covers a range of different scales from very large hydraulic turbines (10m diameter runner), steam and gas turbines to small automotive turbochargers that can fit roughly in the palm of our hand. Improving the performance of rotating machinery has long been realized as a crucial factor in the success of the system as a whole. Continue reading

Cars and Electronics in Tokyo: 2014 Automotive Simulation World Congress

This is the third year that ANSYS hosted the Automotive Simulation World Congress (ASWC), an international conference focused on engineering simulation in the ground transportation industry. The ASWC is an annual conference that rotates between the three major regions of the world. In previous blogs, I wrote about the 2012 and 2013 ASWC’s held in Detroit and Frankfurt respectively. This year the conference was held in Tokyo on October 9 and 10. Continue reading

Becoming an Engineering Hero – Exploring the Great Wall of China

The Chinese believe that you can’t be a true hero unless you climb the Great Wall of China. As someone who yearns to be a hero in everyone’s eyes, (much less the eyes of 1.3 billion Chinese folks), I set out to conquer the wall earlier this month during a vacation to Beijing, Xi’an and Hong Kong.

image at the Great Wall of China

First, a grossly abbreviated history of the Great Wall: While several small walls were constructed as early as the 8th century BC, it was Qin Shi Huang, considered the first emperor of China (and the body protected by the equally amazing terracotta warrior army), who devised a large wall to protect his territory from northern invaders. With the help of several other dynasties, the wall was modified over several thousand years, leading to a modernization effort by the Ming Dynasty in the 14th century. Continue reading

This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology News Articles

Happy Friday, folks! This week’s roundup of interesting engineering technology news articles includes a look at battery development, the impact of coding over the past 30 years and monster trucks simulating earthquakes.

Enjoy!

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This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology News Articles

Happy Friday, folks! This week’s interesting engineering technology news articles looks at the technology behind tennis, robo-dogs at veterinary school and how simulation helped James Cameron reach the bottom of the Mariana Trench.

Enjoy!

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This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology News Articles

This week’s top 5 interesting engineering technology news articles looks at the 64th Annual Technology and Engineering Emmy Awards, the trouble with lithium-ion batteries and 8 ways electric engineering is changing medicine, to name a few!

Enjoy!

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This Week’s Top 5 Engineering Technology News Articles

Happy Friday and Happy New Year, folks! This week’s roundup looks at what we thought 2013 would look like 10 years ago, how engineers are getting creative to keep massive supercomputers cool, and a new computer-based method to figure out a drug’s side effects before it hits the market.

Enjoy!

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