Multiphysics Simulation of a Car Side Mirror with ANSYS AIM

One of the most important problems in the automotive industry is the general multiphysics simulation of coupled phenomena, where multiple — and sometimes conflicting — conditions need to be accounted for, all at the same time. One common application is the resistive heating of a car side mirror.

Designing the mechanism for keeping the mirror defrosted must also take into account the structural response of the mirror as the external environmental conditions, such as air pressure and cold temperature, cause physical stress and thermal deformation. The task is a base requirement of the automotive industry and requires a full multiphysics approach, which is still a challenge for common finite element method (FEM) simulation. In this post, we’ll show you how our engineers at SVS FEM used ANSYS AIM to model a side mirror and multiphysics analysis to solve some of its difficult design problems. Continue reading

TSMC’s InFO Packaging Technology is a Game Changer, empowered by ANSYS

For engineers designing integrated circuits (IC) including system on chips (SoC), using integration and miniaturization to increase performance and bandwidth while reducing power and footprint has been an ongoing, continuous strategy. Now TSMC has developed an InFO packaging technology that is truly a game changer!

Why is InFO technology a game changer?

As mobile phones and other handheld devices continue to be a key driver of semiconductor innovation, chips often go into systems that demand a small footprint and minimum height. Since wiring dimensions of a chip are much smaller than that on a board, a chip cannot be mounted directly on a board. Continue reading

Wireless Power Transfer (WPT)

Wireless power transfer (WPT) is much researched and discussed in the context of IoT, electric vehicles and mobile electronic devices. The methodology of powering a device without a physical connection is well known. However, designing the coil shapes and their placement, maximizing efficiency and validating behavior at the system level still represent challenges that cannot be achieved without simulation. The next frontier to be explored is extending and applying wireless power transfer systems to more applications, such as continuous charging of multiple devices, increasing the range of efficient power transfer and ensuring the WPT system design meets regulatory guidelines. Continue reading