How To Optimize Your Industrial Operations With Digital Twins

The first issue of ANSYS Advantage for 2017 focuses on a revolutionary disruptive technology that you may just be starting to hear about: the digital twin. At the most basic level, a digital twin is a 3-D digital model of an operating physical system. The physical system can be a jet engine, a power generator, a pipeline, a locomotive or an entire industrial plant. Someday, you will most likely have your own digital twin — a virtual copy of yourself — that will allow you and your doctor to predict the behavior of your body to fine tune treatments and optimize your health.

ANSYS Advantage Digital Twins issue

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Learn About the Many Innovative Features of ANSYS 18

I’m excited and honored to share with you the innovations in the latest release of our suite of simulation solutions, ANSYS 18, on behalf of over a thousand R&D professionals at ANSYS. The driving force for these innovations is the spread of simulation to all areas of engineering practice, a trend we call “pervasive engineering simulation.”

This trend is enabling engineers to explore the design parameter space earlier in the product lifecycle (digital exploration), test thousands of detailed designs rapidly and efficiently (digital prototyping), and monitor and optimize their product’s operation after it has been deployed (using digital twins).

To make pervasive engineering simulation as easy as possible for all engineers, we’ve added a lot of new features to each product family, as you can see below. For more information on ANSYS 18, including demo videos, webcasts, application briefs and technical papers, see our ANSYS 18 web pages. Continue reading

Speeding High-Tech Innovation

Since the 1960s, Dr. Gordon Moore’s prediction that computing performance will double every 12 to 18 months has held true. More recently, the gains in computing performance have been enabled by a combination of hardware and software technologies, such as multi-core, multi-threaded designs. The conveniences of the modern world — ubiquitous communication through internet-enabled phones, electronic payments and digital streaming, to name a few, are partly due to continuous engineering innovations delivered through cheaper, faster, more-precise electronics. Continue reading

The Evolution of Simulation and Rotating Machinery

It seems not all that long ago that I first attended the ASME International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI) conference in Toronto. It was just a short drive from my office in Waterloo, Ontario. This year I took a much longer trip to Seoul South Korea to attend the ASME Turbo Expo. As I am already engaged in preparations for the 2017 edition that will be held in Charlotte, NC, I am reminded that much has changed in how rotating machinery is designed and operated. No doubt more evolution will be evident in the 2017 conference. One difference is that the conference will be held in conjunction with the ASME Power and Energy conference. I think that this makes a lot of sense, given the continued important role of turbomachinery in power and energy production and transmission. Continue reading

10 Simulation Advancements for Turbomachinery in ANSYS 17.0

Turbomachinery can be the most rewarding of CFD simulations. At the same time, it can be the most challenging.

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Turbomachinery covers a broad range of products including compressors, turbines (gas, hydraulic, steam, wind), turbochargers, pumps, fans and more. And turbomachinery users demand ongoing improvements, such as increased efficiency, reliability and durability while reducing emissions (for those involving combustion) and noise. Continue reading

Engineering Simulation in a World of “Grow or Go”

In his recent blog, my colleague Todd McDevitt described how engineering simulation is a multiplier of top line growth. That reminded me of an article I read recently by McKinsey & Company arguing that we continue to live in a business world of “grow or go,” i.e., adapt or die. I have unashamedly borrowed the title of that article here, with due thanks to the author of the original. Continue reading

Simulation Speeds Innovation for Pump and Turbine Company

Gilkes Cooling pumps

Cooling pumps Courtesy Gilkes

On November 3rd, as part of the ANSYS Convergence webinar series, we will presenting an interesting story on how simulation has enabled a well-established company to move rapidly along the innovation curve. That company is Gilbert, Gilkes & Gordon Ltd., aka Gilkes. The company has successfully operated for over 150 years in the Lakes District of the United Kingdom. Their main products are small hydropower systems for generating electricity, and pumps for circulating cooling water in diesel engines. Continue reading

ASME Turbo Expo in its 60th year

2015 is a special anniversary year for ASME Turbo Expo: its 60th. This year the annual conference will be held June 15-19 in Montréal Canada, at the Palais des Congrès de Montréal. As in previous years,ASME Turbo Expo ASME Turbo Expo is the premier event on the international turbomachinery calendar. Besides gas turbine related sessions there are a host of others covering steam and wind turbines, compressors, turbochargers, fans and blowers, to name a few. Continue reading

Blade Row Flow Modeling in ANSYS 16.0

As you have probably heard, in January of this year, ANSYS 16.0 was released with a full set of new features and exciting enhancements covering our entire simulation portfolio (see more here). But in this blog, I would like to tell you a little more about turbomachinery blade row flow modeling capability in ANSYS 16.0.

Transient blade row (TBR) simulation is an important analysis and design tool, enabling turbomachinery designers to reliably improve the performance and predict the durability of rotating machinery. Traditional  transient simulation methods are expensive since it requires simulation of all blades in the full 360 degrees  to accurately account for the pitch difference between adjacent blade rows. However, ANSYS CFX pitch-change methods resolve this challenge by providing time accurate  unsteady turbomachinery flow simulations on just a small sector of the machine annulus (typically simulating only one or a few blades, a reduced blade row model), thus tremendously reducing computing cost resources and and reducing the overall time to obtain the simulation. Continue reading

5 Improved Workflows for Rotating Machinery Design and Analysis

There have been a number of new and exciting workflow enhancements included in ANSYS 16.0 for those who design and analyze rotating machinery to make data transfers and simulation setup easier. Here are the top five enhancements:

1) BladeGen to BladeEditor

In ANSYS 16.0, it is now possible to load BladeGen data into BladeEditor in Workbench. Users could always link BladeGen to BladeEditor (i.e ImportBGD function) in Workbench, but to perform a LoadBGD command, it was required to go into BladeEditor and find the BladeGen file to load manually. With the Create New > Geometry feature from the BladeGen (right click menu shown below) this process is much easier now. Continue reading