Learn How Simulation Speeds Turbomachinery Development: TurboExpo Preview

Turbine blades of turbo jet engine turboexpo

I was reminded just how complicated and expensive it is to develop a jet engine when I came across a video describing GE’s recent $26 million Cdn investment to upgrade its Winnipeg test facility. That is on top of even bigger investments by Rolls-Royce ($50 million) and GE ($40 million) and in recent years. Physical testing is not only expensive, it is time consuming and can lengthen design cycles.

Meanwhile, it has become easier than ever to simulate engine performance prior to any physical testing. Improved techniques like harmonic analysis, turbomachinery-specific workflows and better validation coupled with faster, more capable high performance & cloud computing are quickly expanding simulation so engineers can be confident in their designs before the first prototype is ever built. While physical testing is not going away anytime soon, ANSYS is working on digital prototyping with leading turbomachinery companies and helping them to cut it down to size. Continue reading

Aeromechanics and Performance Simulation for Turbomachinery

Prediction of blade row performance and aeromechanics is important to turbomachinery development because turbomachinery blading lies at the heart of all types of turbomachines: pumps, fans, compressors, turbines etc. Improving the aerodynamic (or hydrodynamic) and structural aspects of the blading is essential to meeting modern requirements for performance and durability. If we consider that the fluid mechanics primarily influences performance, including fuel efficiency, then the structural mechanics is more responsible for durability. But of course, the two are closely related, and that is particularly true as the operating temperature increases, as in the hot section of modern gas turbines. Most end users do not want to sacrifice durability for energy efficiency, but rather demand both. Continue reading