Top 5 Engineering Technology Articles This Week

My picks for the Top 5 engineering technology articles are focused on the topic of artificial intelligence this week — a topic I personally find fascinating. AI technologies already permeate our lives and have been fueled in part by cloud computing and web-based data gathering, so I hope you’ll enjoy exploring this fast going research area with me.

Microsoft is putting Cortana machine learning in a fridge
What If Intelligent Machines Could Learn From Each Other?
Study says artificial intelligence will change our lives but won’t kill us
How Artificial Intelligence is Helping Japanese Cucumber Farmers
New center to align AI systems with human values

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Microsoft is putting Cortana machine learning in a fridge
Techcrunch

liebherr-stage-refrigerators-and-freezers-1Even though this is just a prototype for now, Microsoft is working with an appliance manufacturer to create a truly smart refrigerator. I first started reading about this concept back in 2013 when it was reported that Japan’s electronics firms were implementing “smart” appliances.

What Microsoft is doing differently here is using the data to make it a “learning” fridge. It appears that it will be focused on food management. Meaning it will be able to recognize new types of object and measure how much product has been consumed, thus being able to not only inventory the contents but be able to help manage a more intelligent shopping list. Not sure I’m sold on this one yet, but it’s intriguing.

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What If Intelligent Machines Could Learn From Each Other?
SingularityHUB

engineering technology

The internet of things, virtual reality. augmented reality and artificial intelligence are in the forefront of most media outlets these days, and even though the conversations began long ago, there are many questions to answer. We know that sensor devices are at the core of IoT, with microprocessors, memory, wireless interfaces and batteries as the energy source, but adding AI to the mix raises some interesting additional questions:

  • Does a device compromise the privacy of its owner if it participates in a shared learning environment?
  • How does a device know which neighboring devices to trust when deciding which ones to collaborate with?
  • What if a malicious entity enters a network with the aim of injecting disruptive logic into a shared IoT learning environment?

As products are developed and introduced, it’s comforting to know that while there are no hard and fast answers, researchers are considering how consumers might potentially be affected.

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Study says artificial intelligence will change our lives but won’t kill us
Geekwire

Stanford University has just released a report entitled Artificial Intelligence and Life in 2030. This report is the first in a planned series of studies that will continue for at least
a hundred years.  AI technologies, including self-driving cars, healthcare diagnostics and targeted treatments, and physical assistance for elder care are expected. Robotics are already being applied to facilitate the delivery of online purchases through drones and self-driving trucks.

Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk have already raised concerns that this technology could get out of hand, but it’s probably safe to say that we’re not facing a “Terminator” style robot uprising. The Stanford report represents a first look at AI applications across eight domains of human activity.


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How Artificial Intelligence is Helping Japanese Cucumber Farmers
Newsweek

Cucumber farmers in Japan are using Google’s artificial intelligence software to carry out the task of sorting vegetables, one of the most time-consuming processes they face along with being a time-intensive system to learn.

Makoto Koike, who worked as a computer systems designer in the automobile industry prior to returning to his parent’s farm, designed a sorting system to address these problems using a $35 Raspberry Pi 3 computer and Google’s open source deep-learning platform TensorFlow.


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New center to align AI systems with human values
Berkeley News

This week UC Berkley announced a new Centre for Human-Compatible Artificial Intelligence, which is being funded by a $5.5 million grant from the Open Philanthropy Project, with additional grants for the center’s research from the Leverhulme Trust and the Future of Life Institute. The center is looking at ways to guarantee that even the most sophisticated of AI systems will act in a manned that is aligned with human values.

Stuart Russell, who will lead the center, is a UC Berkeley professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences, as well as the author of Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, originally published in 1995. While I have not personally read the book, while doing further research on it, I was surprised to learn that AI was formally initiated in 1956, when the name was coined, and that even then AI work had already been underway for about five years.
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Thank you for joining me on my journey into further understanding the field of artificial intelligence ! If you have read any interesting articles or research on this topic, please share in the comments section of the blog!

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