How to Prepare for Engineering Jobs in Simulation

Learning simulation is a great way to get ahead in the engineering job search.

Learning simulation is a great way to get ahead in the engineering job search.

Simulation is ubiquitous throughout industry, but it wasn’t always that way. What started as a tool for the aerospace and automotive sectors is now spawning an engineering job everywhere.

“You can get an engineering job simulating hair dryers, refrigerators even surgical equipment. It’s really universal,” says Gilles Eggenspieler, Academic Program sales director at ANSYS.

“Companies tell us that they look for two things in the engineers they hire,” adds Eggenspieler. “Did they build anything, and do they have any special skills?” Continue reading

Near-instant Simulations Speed Up Prototyping and Additive Manufacturing Labs

Additive manufacturing makes designing a lattice structure for a bracket possible. However, does it have a chance of success? Simulation can tell you.

Additive manufacturing makes designing a lattice structure for a bracket possible. However, does it have a chance of success? Simulation can tell you.

Traditional prototype techniques take weeks and cost a considerable amount of a product development budget.

It’s true that additive manufacturing has reduced the time and cost to build prototypes. However, the near-instant simulation capabilities of ANSYS Discovery Live can speed up prototyping labs even more.

“Traditional simulation tools are hard to use, take a long time to produce results and are too expensive to be used on a regular basis,” says Tejas Rao, manager of ANSYS’ Discovery Live Technical Team.

“Discovery Live, however, offers instantaneous real-time simulation in an extremely easy-to-use multiphysics interface,” Rao adds. “It also includes integrated geometry manipulation. This means you can do simulation on your own in seconds.”

So how can Discovery Live help a prototyping lab? Continue reading

Simulation Compares How HUD Housings Affect Image Quality

HUD informs drivers of their speed, the speed limit, next turn and more — without forcing them to move their eyes off the road.

HUD informs drivers of their speed, the speed limit, next turn and more — without forcing them to move their eyes off the road.

Any fan of Iron Man knows the power of an effective head-up display (HUD). But you don’t need to be fighting Thanos to benefit from a HUD.

In fact, HUDs can become a significant enabler of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) in the automotive industry.

An effective HUD can inform a driver without forcing them to move their eyes off the road. It can show:

  • Car speed.
  • The road’s speed limit.
  • The next turn.
  • Traffic.
  • Lane suggestions.

For engineers, the challenge is to design a display that doesn’t force the driver to change focus. As a result, the information must remain legible under all road conditions. Simulation can help engineers design HUDs for any condition. Continue reading

How to Automate Parameter Changes in ANSYS Discovery Live

Parameter studies in Discovery Live automates design point creation. The geometry and simulations are then automatically generated in real-time.

Parameter studies in Discovery Live automates design point creation. The geometry and simulations are then automatically generated in real-time.

Real-time design analysis in ANSYS Discovery Live is now more automated. Previously, you needed to manually change each parameter to see a new simulation result.

When you had multiple parameters to adjust or were curious about all possible permutations, the process of manually iterating through the parameters could be time-prohibitive.

This is where Discovery Live’s parameter study feature comes into play. It allows you to rapidly explore numerous design possibilities by automatically cycling though geometric or simulation parameters. Continue reading

ANSYS 19.2 Speeds Your Time to Market with New CAE Workflows

Engineers are under pressure to optimize designs during ever-shrinking development cycles. In response, computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools — like the latest enhancements in the ANSYS 19.2 release — now facilitate faster and easier-to-use workflows.

New ANSYS Fluent Task-based Workflow with Mosaic-enabled Meshing

A Mosaic mesh of an F1 wing connects hexahedral elements in the bulk and isotropic elements in the boundary, using polyhedral elements.

A Mosaic mesh of an F1 wing connects hexahedral elements in the bulk and isotropic elements in the boundary, using polyhedral elements.

Engineers using ANSYS Fluent can now create more accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

Fluent’s single-window, task-based workflow for watertight geometries dramatically reduces the time to set up and run CFD simulations.

This new workflow incorporates best practices to help prevent engineers from second-guessing themselves as they set up complex CFD models. Continue reading

Simulations Prove Composites Can Increase an Aircraft’s Payloads and Service Life

Streamline simulations from ANSYS Fluent simulate the aerodynamic loads on composite wings.

Streamline simulations from ANSYS Fluent simulate the aerodynamic loads on composite wings.

Composite materials have a significant history with the aerospace industry due to their light weight and substantial strength.

However, you will still see a lot of metal wings flying around.

Metal wings have a limited service life — often as short as six to eight years — due to corrosion and fatigue.

And, during this period, the wings will require regular maintenance.

When the wing inevitably needs to be replaced, the cost can be so large that many airliners will scrap the whole vehicle.

Aero Composites aims to replace many of these metal wings with composite counterparts. Continue reading

Engineering Colleges Need Simulation in the Classroom

A class within Western New England University is learning how to use simulation software.

A class within Western New England University is learning how to use simulation software.

Engineering colleges need to get on the simulation bandwagon.

Simulation is a necessity for the automotive, aerospace, consumer goods, electronics, industrial and even health care industries.

So, why do so many engineering colleges not teach the basics of finite element analysis (FEA) or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software?

I cannot stress enough the importance of learning and understanding simulation tools based on my experience as a recent mechanical engineering grad. Continue reading

Simulation Can Help Avoid Deformation Failures in Metal Additive Manufacturing

Simulation shows how the additive manufacturing process distorted a bike stem after it was removed from its supports.

Simulation shows how the additive manufacturing process distorted a bike stem after it was removed from its supports.

Engineers put a lot of time into designing parts to a specific tolerance. Unfortunately, metal additive manufacturing (AM) causes thermal stresses that can significantly deform these parts.

If the part warps — even a little — it could affect performance and how it fits into an assembly.

To predict and compensate for part deformations, engineers can use ANSYS Additive Print. The tool uses these predictions to ensures the print deforms into the part the engineer intended. Continue reading

How to Build a Computational Fluid Dynamics Mesh for Fast and Accurate Simulations

Traditionally, CFD experts and novices won’t be happy working with a hard-to-mesh geometry like this. However, Mosaic technology makes building this mesh much easier.

Traditionally, CFD experts and novices won’t be happy working with a hard-to-mesh geometry like this. However, Mosaic technology makes building this mesh much easier. (Courtesy of Centre for Sports Engineering Research, Sheffield Hallam University)

Mesh creation is one of the biggest reasons engineers have a hard time setting up a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation.

Even CFD experts can have a hard time building a fast and accurate mesh from complex geometries and flow regimes.

The trick is that engineers need accuracy near the thin boundary layers, which requires a very tight mesh.

However, this tight mesh slows down the processing of the fluid’s bulk without adding any accuracy.

The solution is to have multiple meshes — with different densities and element types — at different regions of the geometry. This would give you meshes that are accurate at the boundary and fast in the bulk. Continue reading

Simulation Best Practices: High Resolution Images that Impress Customers

Optimal design of a Nautilus-based dual-usage turbine

Optimal design of a Nautilus-based dual-usage turbine

High resolution images of engineering simulations are fantastic marketing materials. Just look at all the entries we get for the ANSYS Hall of Fame.

If you had the cash, which yacht would you buy:

  • The one with a gorgeous print graphic of a ship optimized by simulation software?
  • Or the one that says “best in class” seven times in a 30-word ad?

“But, wait a minute, I’m an engineer not a marketer,” you say aloud. “How can I build a simulation image to wow my customers and the ANSYS Hall of Fame judges?”

Well, you follow some best practices. Continue reading