Cloud Computing Speeds Antenna Design

In a previous blog, I noted that born in the cloud companies can be a boon to tech startups looking to optimize precious resources. In this post, I offer a spectacular case in point.

Optisys had big goals and big compute needs. Designing its next-gen antenna, the Utah-based startup sought order-of-magnitude reductions in size, weight and lead time, and a cost-effective solution for running large, concurrent RF electronics simulations. Establishing an in-house IT function wasn’t an option: Optisys (like many startups) had little appetite or budget for investing outside its core business. Instead, it adopted Rescale’s cloud-based platform to satisfy its simulation needs. Continue reading

ANSYS and Green Hills Software Together at CES 2018

Safety first — especially when it comes to engineering control systems for autonomous vehicles. These systems must meet the same high-level safety standards long-mandated for aerospace and defense technologies. In addition, the operating systems that run the certified programs must also be safe — from hackers.

Together, ANSYS and Green Hills Software have developed a comprehensive solution for driverless cars that rises to the level of ISO 26262 (ASIL D) certification and is invulnerable to hacker attacks. Continue reading

Looking Forward to AIAA SciTech Forum

In a few days, I’ll be in Florida at the AIAA SciTech Forum, along with some of our technology experts. This is the place where you can get an inside look at how much innovation is going on in the aerospace industry today. At ANSYS, we are constantly expanding our simulation platform capabilities through internal development and integration, acquisitions and partnership. Let me highlight just a tiny part of what happened in 2017 and what you can “touch” at our booth at SciTech.

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Investigating Placement of Antennas Inside an Aircraft Fuselage

You may be surprised to learn that a standard passenger jet can have 30 to 50 antennas protruding from the aircraft’s external surface, producing drag forces that can drastically reduce fuel efficiency at a time when airlines are trying to reduce energy consumption. Most antenna designs are engineered for safety purposes, such as air traffic control, traffic collision avoidance, instrument landing systems and distance measuring equipment. Increasingly, antennas are being added to meet passenger demand for more and faster Wi-Fi access, in-flight TV and cellphone applications.

aircraft antennas

Antennas are mounted on the exterior of today’s airliners

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The Firenze Race Team (FRT) Engineers Innovation

As students at the University of Florence, we aren’t just racing to class, we’re racing around Europe. Last season was particularly exciting for our 35-member Firenze Race Team (FRT). We designed two new single-seater cars — the FR-17T and FR-17DT — and introduced them at Formula Student competitions in Italy and Germany.

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Ensuring Signal Integrity Throughout a Channel

Electronic devices — with well-designed signal integrity (SI) — have transformed the way we communicate, work, learn and entertain. Around the globe, we find smart phones, fiber-optic and wireless networks, pocket-size computers, LED screen displays that mimic paper and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that deliver packages. Automobiles are filled with electronics that control engine functions, keep wheels from skidding, avoid accidents, direct our travel routes and, now, drive themselves. Aircraft are equipped with radar, fly-by-wire systems and airborne communications. And the innovations keep coming…

deep channel analysis for signal integrity

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Enhancing the Accuracy of Full-body Scanners for Improved Airport Security

If you’ve traveled by plane in recent years, you know the airport security drill: Put all your possessions through the X-ray detector, empty your pockets and step into one of the full-body scanners — or millimeter-wave holographic scanner, to use its official name. After you raise your hands above your head, the scanner sends out millimeter waves (mm-waves) that penetrate your clothing and bounce off your skin — or any other object you might be trying to conceal under your clothing, like a weapon of some sort. (The mm-wave radiation is 10,000 times less powerful than a single cellphone call, so you need not be concerned about any health effects.) An antenna array in the sweeping scanner device detects the reflected mm-waves and reconstructs an image of your body.

Airport mm-wave scanner

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Do Trees Improve the Near-road Air Quality?

The Laboratory for Environmental Flow Modeling at the University of California, Riverside, has used ANSYS Fluent software to model a variety of environmental flows. As a third year Ph.D. candidate student in Mechanical Engineering, I recently evaluated the influence of roadside vegetation barriers on the near-road air quality using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), as part of a research team that included my colleague Seyedmorteza Amini and my advisor Dr. Marko Princevac.

Exposure to traffic-related air pollution leads to public health concerns such as respiratory problems, birth and developmental defects, cardiovascular effects and cancer for people who live and work near major roadways. The near-road air quality can be improved directly by deploying vehicle emission control techniques, using alternative fuels or electric vehicles (EVs), or via passive pollutant control and roadside configuration design such as solid and vegetative barriers. Continue reading

How to Avoid Turbulence in Cloud Computing

seat belts turbulence clouds“Please fasten your seat belts, we may encounter some turbulence as we enter the clouds ahead,” the pilot announced on my flight back from a big computer conference in Denver last month. The lady sitting next to me leaned over and admitted: “I never really understand what the pilot means by that announcement.” It reminded me that you may also need some clarity about cloud computing for your ANSYS simulations.

Bumps along a cloud-computing journey can be caused by concerns about security and where the data is stored, lack of licensing options and/or end-user productivity. We have taken steps to ensure you can move in and out of the cloud smoothly, and in analogy with what I just wrote: in our case “no seat belts required.”

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The Australian Formula Collective Designs Winning Race Car Components using ANSYS Simulation Solutions

The University of Western Australia Motorsport team has competed in Formula SAE Australasia since 2001. With the help of ANSYS pervasive engineering simulation solutions, our team has won the event twice, taken the trophy for engineering design four times and collected more than 30 trophies for individual events. As of 2017, we are now partnering with Edith Cowan University Racing, another Western Australian team, in a collaboration known as Australian Formula Collective (AFC).

Western Australia Motorsport teamAustralian Formula Collective with ECU Racing’s Formula SAE vehicle designed with the help of ANSYS simulation solutions.

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