Cloud Computing Speeds Antenna Design

In a previous blog, I noted that born in the cloud companies can be a boon to tech startups looking to optimize precious resources. In this post, I offer a spectacular case in point.

Optisys had big goals and big compute needs. Designing its next-gen antenna, the Utah-based startup sought order-of-magnitude reductions in size, weight and lead time, and a cost-effective solution for running large, concurrent RF electronics simulations. Establishing an in-house IT function wasn’t an option: Optisys (like many startups) had little appetite or budget for investing outside its core business. Instead, it adopted Rescale’s cloud-based platform to satisfy its simulation needs. Continue reading

ANSYS Discovery Live Engineering Design Competition

Over the last four months, I’ve had the pleasure of talking with several ANSYS Discovery Live technology preview users and learning about their unique stories. Regardless of the user, there is one common theme I hear — excitement. Users are excited about many things this technological breakthrough brings to them, and I am happy to announce another exciting aspect of Discovery Live.

Introducing the 1st Discovery Live Engineering Design Competition

Starting today, we are launching a Discovery Live engineering design competition! This is an opportunity for anyone to put on display their experience with Discovery Live, show the world their findings, and win awesome prizes. Continue reading

ANSYS and Green Hills Software Together at CES 2018

Safety first — especially when it comes to engineering control systems for autonomous vehicles. These systems must meet the same high-level safety standards long-mandated for aerospace and defense technologies. In addition, the operating systems that run the certified programs must also be safe — from hackers.

Together, ANSYS and Green Hills Software have developed a comprehensive solution for driverless cars that rises to the level of ISO 26262 (ASIL D) certification and is invulnerable to hacker attacks. Continue reading

Investigating Placement of Antennas Inside an Aircraft Fuselage

You may be surprised to learn that a standard passenger jet can have 30 to 50 antennas protruding from the aircraft’s external surface, producing drag forces that can drastically reduce fuel efficiency at a time when airlines are trying to reduce energy consumption. Most antenna designs are engineered for safety purposes, such as air traffic control, traffic collision avoidance, instrument landing systems and distance measuring equipment. Increasingly, antennas are being added to meet passenger demand for more and faster Wi-Fi access, in-flight TV and cellphone applications.

aircraft antennas

Antennas are mounted on the exterior of today’s airliners

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Ensuring Signal Integrity Throughout a Channel

Electronic devices — with well-designed signal integrity (SI) — have transformed the way we communicate, work, learn and entertain. Around the globe, we find smart phones, fiber-optic and wireless networks, pocket-size computers, LED screen displays that mimic paper and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that deliver packages. Automobiles are filled with electronics that control engine functions, keep wheels from skidding, avoid accidents, direct our travel routes and, now, drive themselves. Aircraft are equipped with radar, fly-by-wire systems and airborne communications. And the innovations keep coming…

deep channel analysis for signal integrity

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Enhancing the Accuracy of Full-body Scanners for Improved Airport Security

If you’ve traveled by plane in recent years, you know the airport security drill: Put all your possessions through the X-ray detector, empty your pockets and step into one of the full-body scanners — or millimeter-wave holographic scanner, to use its official name. After you raise your hands above your head, the scanner sends out millimeter waves (mm-waves) that penetrate your clothing and bounce off your skin — or any other object you might be trying to conceal under your clothing, like a weapon of some sort. (The mm-wave radiation is 10,000 times less powerful than a single cellphone call, so you need not be concerned about any health effects.) An antenna array in the sweeping scanner device detects the reflected mm-waves and reconstructs an image of your body.

Airport mm-wave scanner

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The Bell X-1’s Historic Supersonic Flight with ANSYS AIM

During the autumn of 1947, the sleek orange form of the Bell X-1 “Glamorous Glennis” dropped clear of its B-29 mothership and lit its four chambered XLR-11 rocket engine. The flight that followed marked a milestone in aviation history as the X-1 and pilot, Charles “Chuck” Yeager successfully completed the first controlled supersonic flight.

The lives of many pilots had been claimed during World War II by the little understood effects of compressibility on an aircraft as it approached the speed of sound and the X-1 was built for the purpose of investigating this flight regime. With only a vague idea of what to expect, the X-1 test pilots and engineers bravely pushed the speed limit leading to the momentous flight on 14th October 1947. Continue reading

Ensuring EMI/EMC Compliance with Electronics Simulation

Today we live in a hyper-connected world, surrounded by smart products. If industry forecasts are correct, by 2020 — just 2 short years from now — there will be over 28 billion internet-connected devices. Beyond smart phones and autonomous vehicles, smart cities, smart factories, and smart homes are also quickly emerging as promising opportunities that could help improve how we live, work and play.

While these new capabilities will be a delight to us as consumers, they are a nightmare for engineers and product designers. With hundreds of sensors, microprocessors, and wired and wireless communication components, engineers face immense challenges in ensuring reliability and performance. In the complex web of electronic circuitry, something, somewhere that is left unaddressed could lead to failure. One of the big challenges confronting product designers is electromagnetic interference, or EMI.

communication channelFull-wave model of communications channel
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Discovery Live Paves the Way for Rapid Simulation Results

I was recently presented with a unique opportunity to compare the results of full ANSYS CFD simulations with the results obtained using the new ANSYS Discovery Live product, which provides results instantly upon changing the geometry without interrupting a run. I was very pleased and surprised by the speed and accuracy of Discovery Live in this comparison test.

I work for Astec, Inc., the subsidiary of Astec Industries that builds asphalt plants. Roadtec Inc., another Astec Industries company, builds asphalt pavers, reclaimers and material transfer vehicles (MTVs). An MTV helps to accomplish non-stop, non-contact paving by offering a continuous supply of Hot Mix to the paver. By separating dump trucks from the paver this way, contractors are able to make a smoother finished road.

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ANSYS Adds 3DSIM for Simulation-Driven Additive Manufacturing

As we announced recently, ANSYS and 3DSIM have joined forces to offer engineers, designers and machine operators the only end-to-end additive manufacturing (AM) simulation workflow in the world today. We call it simulation-driven additive manufacturing. The powerful combination of exaSIM and FLEX from 3DSIM with ANSYS Workbench and the full line of ANSYS solvers will give you unprecedented design-to-print capabilities for AM.

Why is this important? Because there are still challenges to be overcome in AM — especially for metals — to ensure that every part will be built successfully with full confidence in its design and functionality the first time through the AM process. Our aim is to ensure first build success through comprehensive simulation of all aspects of additive manufacturing, from machine setup to the microstructure of the metal to the structural integrity of the finished part. Continue reading