ANSYS Discovery Live Engineering Design Competition

Over the last four months, I’ve had the pleasure of talking with several ANSYS Discovery Live technology preview users and learning about their unique stories. Regardless of the user, there is one common theme I hear — excitement. Users are excited about many things this technological breakthrough brings to them, and I am happy to announce another exciting aspect of Discovery Live.

Introducing the 1st Discovery Live Engineering Design Competition

Starting today, we are launching a Discovery Live engineering design competition! This is an opportunity for anyone to put on display their experience with Discovery Live, show the world their findings, and win awesome prizes. Continue reading

The Bell X-1’s Historic Supersonic Flight with ANSYS AIM

During the autumn of 1947, the sleek orange form of the Bell X-1 “Glamorous Glennis” dropped clear of its B-29 mothership and lit its four chambered XLR-11 rocket engine. The flight that followed marked a milestone in aviation history as the X-1 and pilot, Charles “Chuck” Yeager successfully completed the first controlled supersonic flight.

The lives of many pilots had been claimed during World War II by the little understood effects of compressibility on an aircraft as it approached the speed of sound and the X-1 was built for the purpose of investigating this flight regime. With only a vague idea of what to expect, the X-1 test pilots and engineers bravely pushed the speed limit leading to the momentous flight on 14th October 1947. Continue reading

Discovery Live Paves the Way for Rapid Simulation Results

I was recently presented with a unique opportunity to compare the results of full ANSYS CFD simulations with the results obtained using the new ANSYS Discovery Live product, which provides results instantly upon changing the geometry without interrupting a run. I was very pleased and surprised by the speed and accuracy of Discovery Live in this comparison test.

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What’s Happening with ANSYS Discovery Live

It has been nearly two months since we unveiled ANSYS Discovery Live to the public and made it freely available for download. Discovery Live is the first ever real-time engineering simulation software available to all engineers. Since that time, many things have happened that has made this launch a tremendous success. I’d like to share some of those with you today, and make you aware of some exciting opportunities.

Behind ANSYS developing Discovery Live was the firm belief in the power of simulation and its benefits for everyone. The ability to accurately predict a product’s performance as part of the validation stage, or make adjustments to models to simulate products already in the field are examples of pervasive engineering simulation. But what Discovery Live has done is further advance the reach of simulation to the upfront design exploration stage. ANSYS has had a passion for helping engineers in this space for some time, and Discovery Live represents a true milestone for making this happen even more than it already has. Continue reading

How to Approach Topology Optimization in ANSYS AIM 18.2

Topology optimization has been around for last 20-25 years, however only recently got more attention due to improvements made in additive manufacturing and 3D printing processes (DMLS (DMLM), EBM, SLM, SLS). More importantly, simulation driven topology optimization is rekindled due to more cost effective availability of almost infinite compute capacity in the form of GPUs, TPUs and cloud which makes it easier than ever to iterate over design choices. Modern topology optimization is mixed with machine learning to learn aesthetic styles and further complement the design by volumes of simulation.

ANSYS took its first step in ANSYS 18.0 in the context of ANSYS Mechanical and now it is expanded to the designer community through ANSYS AIM addressing primarily two key issues: abstracting the mechanics of simulation with eager program controlled setup followed by embedded experience with automated geometry reconstruction. You can organically design parts from a single block of material or improve an existing design, both workflows are fully supported and where possible automated. Continue reading

Student Space Systems Aims High With Liquid Rocket Engine

In 2014, Student Space Systems (SSS) began at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as a high-powered rocketry group. In those early days, most of the rocket building was done simply with prefabricated parts. Since then, SSS has progressed to designing and creating its own rocket technology, including power electronics, telemetry and propulsion systems. One of its biggest goals — and challenges — has been to create a liquid-fueled rocket engine built with additive manufacturing techniques.

SSS members prepare Olympus rocket for flight in Mojave Desert Continue reading

ANSYS AIM 18.2 Extends Fluid Flow Simulation to More Real-world Applications

In ANSYS AIM 18.2, several improvements have been introduced to the capabilities for simulating fluids. In this blog, I’ll highlight two of what I think are the most significant.

First: time-dependent fluid flow (including solid-fluid heat transfer). Time-dependent fluid flow enables the modelling of both applied physics conditions that change over time, and unsteady flow phenomena, for example varying inlet velocity and/or temperature in an internal pipe flow simulation; or vortex shedding from external flow around a cylinder, such as a chimney.

Second: particle injection (also known as discrete phase modelling, or DPM for short), where the injected particle could be a droplet, for example, a fire sprinkler system spraying water into air, or raindrops, but it could also be a bubble of gas into a fluid. Continue reading

Instant Engineering Simulation: ANSYS Discovery Live

ANSYS has long held the vision that every engineer would be able to benefit from the insight of engineering simulation. It seems intuitive that you would want to build a digital model of your product and instantly see stresses, flows, temperature, etc. to gain insights into the design, as well as make changes in in real-time and see how they affect the performance.

Speed and Ease of Use Changes Everything

Simulation is ranked as one of the most critical engineering technologies in this age of the Internet of Things and additive manufacturing. However, half a century after its introduction it is still the domain of specialists and used predominantly for the most complex of engineering projects. Why? The learning curve is steep, sometimes requiring decades of experience, and it is after all rocket-science and can be both complex and time consuming to do simulations. All of this is about to change! Continue reading

Embedding ANSYS AIM into a STEM Education

In a high school classroom, we battle constantly against a storm of changing technologies, competing educational needs, time and materials. As technology advances and industries change, educators do their best to keep students competitive and prepared for these changes. It becomes increasingly difficult, though, to develop meaningful challenges for students because of the cost of materials and other resources.

At the same time, it is challenging to justify the time and importance of your content against other subjects in the school, such as math or science. With the power of ANSYS AIM and ANSYS SpaceClaim, the technology education classroom has been given an important tool to fight back against the storm. Continue reading

Geometry Scripting in ANSYS SpaceClaim for Rapid Model Changes

Geometry scripting, macros and batch files are great ways to automate repetitive tasks or reduce a complicated workflow to a single mouse click. Although you may have never written or recorded your own script, there’s a good chance you’ve benefited from one created by someone else.

ANSYS SpaceClaim recently introduced a geometry scripting environment that further eases common geometry related tasks. More specifically, it’s a simple way to record or write a set of commands that will automate repetitive tasks or make complicated workflows easy. It also serves as a method of extending the user interface to make otherwise impossible geometry by expanding the different things you can do with geometry. From replaying recorded changes on imported models to parameterizing variables only thought possible in a feature-based system, scripting is a powerful ally in making smart, robust geometry. Continue reading