How to Approach Topology Optimization in ANSYS AIM 18.2

Topology optimization has been around for last 20-25 years, however only recently got more attention due to improvements made in additive manufacturing and 3D printing processes (DMLS (DMLM), EBM, SLM, SLS). More importantly, simulation driven topology optimization is rekindled due to more cost effective availability of almost infinite compute capacity in the form of GPUs, TPUs and cloud which makes it easier than ever to iterate over design choices. Modern topology optimization is mixed with machine learning to learn aesthetic styles and further complement the design by volumes of simulation.

ANSYS took its first step in ANSYS 18.0 in the context of ANSYS Mechanical and now it is expanded to the designer community through ANSYS AIM addressing primarily two key issues: abstracting the mechanics of simulation with eager program controlled setup followed by embedded experience with automated geometry reconstruction. You can organically design parts from a single block of material or improve an existing design, both workflows are fully supported and where possible automated. Continue reading

ANSYS AIM 18.2 Extends Fluid Flow Simulation to More Real-world Applications

In ANSYS AIM 18.2, several improvements have been introduced to the capabilities for simulating fluids. In this blog, I’ll highlight two of what I think are the most significant.

First: time-dependent fluid flow (including solid-fluid heat transfer). Time-dependent fluid flow enables the modelling of both applied physics conditions that change over time, and unsteady flow phenomena, for example varying inlet velocity and/or temperature in an internal pipe flow simulation; or vortex shedding from external flow around a cylinder, such as a chimney.

Second: particle injection (also known as discrete phase modelling, or DPM for short), where the injected particle could be a droplet, for example, a fire sprinkler system spraying water into air, or raindrops, but it could also be a bubble of gas into a fluid. Continue reading

Proprietary ANSYS App Optimizes Duct Flow and Pressure

Effective design for almost any kind of product, from consumer goods to industrial equipment, requires taking a large number of factors into account. By making appropriate trade-offs using simulation for digital exploration and optimization, companies can quickly develop efficient and reliable products.

For example, industrial gas turbines burn gas to turn rotors to produce electricity, with substantial amounts of hot exhaust gases as a byproduct. Instead of just warming up the surrounding air, the heat contained in exhaust gases can be put to work by capturing it and letting it flow around tubes containing water, converting the water into steam. The boiler that contains the pipes and the exhaust gases is called a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The steam can then flow to a steam turbine to generate more electricity.

Typical inlet duct design point analyzed as part of digital exploration

Typical inlet duct design point analyzed

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True-Load Software and ANSYS Workbench Solve Difficult Strain Challenges

As the founder and president of Wolf Star Technologies and the creator of True-Load software, which calculates the loads from measured strain occurring in moving vehicles, I would like to tell you a little about the struggles and triumphs I encountered (and overcame) in my engineering career and how this led to the creation of True-Load. This has culminated in the successful integration of True-Load into the ANSYS Workbench platform, so more engineers than ever will have access to my software and be able to integrate it with their ANSYS simulations. Continue reading

3-D Design Helps Pool Cleaning, Accessibility Go Swimmingly

What comes to mind when you think of public swimming pools?  A refreshing escape from the summer heat? Children playing and swimming? Free-swimmers, divers, and water polo players jockeying for limited space? How 3-D design makes pools cleaner and more accessible for everyone? Hmm. I may need to explain that last one.

While many of us focus on the positive aspects, there are some of us who avoid public pools: non-swimmers, of course; people concerned about bacteria and other health issues; and people with reduced mobility (PMR) who find accessing public pools difficult to manage and unwelcoming.

Hexagone, a French company founded in 1987, has made its mission to serve these last two categories of recreationists, designing and equipping public pools with professional high-tech cleaning devices and creating solutions that increase PMR accessibility and safety. Continue reading

Defining the Future of Cloud-based Engineering Simulation: ANSYS at AWS re:Invent 2016

Each year the cloud faithful converge on Las Vegas in the fall for AWS re:Invent. This year’s event delivered exciting announcements for ANSYS users interested in performing engineering simulation on the AWS cloud.

With well over 30,000 attendees, the 2016 conference was too big to be contained within the expansive Venetian hotel/Sands expo complex and it spilled across into adjacent facilities (comfortable shoes were a requirement). Wednesday’s keynote session by Andy Jassy, CEO and Thursday’s session by Werner Vogels, CTO highlighted the growing reach of AWS. The conference featured a staggering number of new features, services and some powerful new hardware. Continue reading

Billet Designs Uses ANSYS SpaceClaim as Primary 3-D CAD Tool

Billet Designs is a small engineering firm that found great success in using ANSYS SpaceClaim as their primary 3-D CAD tool. They specialize in wide variety of offerings for their clients, including product design for automotive and consumer products, programming, automation, PLC controls and robotics.

Steven Aguirre of Billet Designs says their main focus is on the design of electromechanical components of consumer products. His broad background in various industries gives him a unique and expansive knowledge into common design and product development issues and challenges. As the owner of a small engineering firm, he has to balance product design with marketing, order fulfillment, sales, manufacturing and general development of his product line. Continue reading

Maximizing Engineering Throughput with Pay-Per-Use Simulation in the Cloud

My colleagues Steve Del, Giovanni Petrone and I often discuss the benefits of moving engineering simulation to the cloud, marshalling greater computing resources and faster processing on high-performance computing (HPC) solutions. While most companies would find this compelling, budget-conscious companies are concerned about the costs. The missing piece is a pay-per-use simulation business model, where  you use what you need, when you need it, and only pay for what you use.

Well, now that piece is in place. Last week’s release of ANSYS Enterprise Cloud adds support for ANSYS Elastic Licensing™, enabling you to fully leverage the pay-per-use business model on the public cloud for both hardware and software. Continue reading

How to Greatly Reduce HPC Costs for Engineering Simulation on Cloud

Most simulation engineers with a hunger for high performance computing (HPC) have looked longingly to the cloud. Cloud computing has the potential to provide virtually unlimited access to HPC, enabling larger simulations and more design variations to be done in less time, since many machines working in parallel can solve even very large problems quickly. While the cloud offers much more than unlimited computing power, it’s those HPC resources that provide the strongest pull to the cloud. The question we seek to answer here is, “is it possible to get cloud-based HPC at very low cost?” Continue reading

Getting Faster, Cost-effective Simulation on the Cloud

To get the most value out of engineering simulation, ANSYS customers often take advantage of high performance computing (HPC). In simple terms, HPC enables you to apply a group of computers running in parallel to solve larger problems and/or reduce the solution time for a given problem. Unlike “embarrassingly parallel” applications like genomics or graphics rendering, all of the compute cores involved in a single Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation need to communicate with each other during the solution process. That places significant demands on the network fabric used to connect the machines. Cloud computing can certainly provide computing capacity at a vast, global scale, but can it provide the desired HPC performance? Continue reading