Simulating Eddy Current Testing of Honeycomb Aircraft Panels with ANSYS Discovery AIM

Wing of an airplane flying above the sunrise cloudy sky at morningWithin the aerospace and transportation industries, it is always desirable to minimize weight without sacrificing strength. One such method of achieving this in aircraft wings and other aircraft structures is to use honeycomb paneling. Such structures are susceptible to damage from things like hail or tool drop, however, and the damage may not be noticeable from the surface. The face sheet may rebound, leaving crushing to the honeycomb core hidden beneath the surface.

Accurately determining impact damage in aluminum honeycomb aircraft panels is critical to evaluating the remaining lifetime of these structures. The hidden crushed core decreases the residual strength of the panels, so it’s important to detect it. Based on using a dial depth gauge for measuring dents, determining the impact damage in honeycomb aircraft panels can be laborious and subjective. If the impact damage also includes crushing of the internal honeycomb core, a manual tap tester is often used, which is both manual and subjective. Continue reading

Tame Product Complexity and Enhance Productivity with ANSYS 19

I think you know the story because you are living it every day. It’s not enough anymore to use the most accurate physical models in your simulations (although you won’t give them up!). Your product challenge is vastly more complicated than that. You’re under unrelenting pressure to lower cycle times and reduce costs, while increasing quality and eliminating risk. That calls for more.

That’s why we are so proud of ANSYS 19. We designed it to help you tame complexity and enhance productivity, so you can address your whole product challenge with greater accuracy — across the broadest range of applications.

ANSYS 19 is how we are making simulation even more pervasive.

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The Bell X-1’s Historic Supersonic Flight with ANSYS AIM

During the autumn of 1947, the sleek orange form of the Bell X-1 “Glamorous Glennis” dropped clear of its B-29 mothership and lit its four chambered XLR-11 rocket engine. The flight that followed marked a milestone in aviation history as the X-1 and pilot, Charles “Chuck” Yeager successfully completed the first controlled supersonic flight.

The lives of many pilots had been claimed during World War II by the little understood effects of compressibility on an aircraft as it approached the speed of sound and the X-1 was built for the purpose of investigating this flight regime. With only a vague idea of what to expect, the X-1 test pilots and engineers bravely pushed the speed limit leading to the momentous flight on 14th October 1947. Continue reading

How to Approach Topology Optimization in ANSYS AIM 18.2

Topology optimization has been around for last 20-25 years, however only recently got more attention due to improvements made in additive manufacturing and 3D printing processes (DMLS (DMLM), EBM, SLM, SLS). More importantly, simulation driven topology optimization is rekindled due to more cost effective availability of almost infinite compute capacity in the form of GPUs, TPUs and cloud which makes it easier than ever to iterate over design choices. Modern topology optimization is mixed with machine learning to learn aesthetic styles and further complement the design by volumes of simulation.

ANSYS took its first step in ANSYS 18.0 in the context of ANSYS Mechanical and now it is expanded to the designer community through ANSYS AIM addressing primarily two key issues: abstracting the mechanics of simulation with eager program controlled setup followed by embedded experience with automated geometry reconstruction. You can organically design parts from a single block of material or improve an existing design, both workflows are fully supported and where possible automated. Continue reading

ANSYS AIM 18.2 Extends Fluid Flow Simulation to More Real-world Applications

In ANSYS AIM 18.2, several improvements have been introduced to the capabilities for simulating fluids. In this blog, I’ll highlight two of what I think are the most significant.

First: time-dependent fluid flow (including solid-fluid heat transfer). Time-dependent fluid flow enables the modelling of both applied physics conditions that change over time, and unsteady flow phenomena, for example varying inlet velocity and/or temperature in an internal pipe flow simulation; or vortex shedding from external flow around a cylinder, such as a chimney.

Second: particle injection (also known as discrete phase modelling, or DPM for short), where the injected particle could be a droplet, for example, a fire sprinkler system spraying water into air, or raindrops, but it could also be a bubble of gas into a fluid. Continue reading

ANSYS 18.2 Enhances Simulation Speed and Accuracy

ansys 18 2We continue to expand upon our best-in-class products and platform, and deliver on the Pervasive Engineering Simulation vision, with this week’s release of ANSYS 18.2. This latest release brings increased levels of accuracy, speed and ease-of-use — spurring more engineers to use simulation across every stage of the product lifecycle to design cutting-edge products more efficiently and economically.

More companies are turning to simulation to drive increasingly rapid and innovative product development and gain deeper insight into product design.

“Our customers rely on ANSYS engineering simulation technology to cut costs, limit late-stage design changes, and tame the toughest engineering challenges. This latest release continues to build upon the industry’s most accurate simulation portfolio, offering enhanced speed and accuracy – enabling more users, no matter their level of experience, to reduce development time and increase product quality.” said Mark Hindsbo, ANSYS vice president and general manager.

Highlights of the release include: Continue reading

Structural Simulation Delivers Modular Wi-Fi Towers Quickly

Wi-Fi access today seems more like a right than a privilege. But easy access to Wi-Fi is not widespread in many countries, especially in out-of-the-way rural areas where structural design and building of Wi-Fi towers can be challenging. In the interior of Brazil, only 22 percent of the people have Wi-Fi due to the costs of installing towers and the economics of providing service to sparsely populated areas. But startup Jet Towers is trying to remedy this situation using ANSYS AIM for structural simulation to design prefabricated, modular truss towers that can be installed and running within a week of purchase, instead of the normal five weeks for custom designed Wi-Fi towers.

Simulation helps design Wi-Fi towers

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ANSYS Advantage: Simulate Early for Successful Products

ANSYS Advantage Issue 2 2017The vast majority of engineering decisions are made without the insights that engineering simulation could provide into the impact of those decisions. It is estimated that 80 percent of the total product development costs are locked in by choices made early in the design process — and subsequent analysis and optimization now has to live within the implied constraints or face very costly and time-consuming design changes.

With increasingly complex products taking advantage of advanced materials, additive manufacturing and IoT, this issue will grow exponentially as many more permutations and design options must be evaluated for any given product. The only way to harness the potential of these mega trends, and tame the inherent complexity, is to bring simulation upfront in the product development process. To design the products of tomorrow, leading companies are doing exactly that.

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Enabling Digital Exploration with ANSYS 18.1

Digital exploration has never been more vital to long-term business success than it is today. The product design space is exploding, driven by increasingly smarter devices, advanced materials, and next-generation manufacturing technologies like 3-D printing and mass customization. At the same time sustainability and cost put pressure on identifying and eliminating unnecessary safety margins, while still ensuring long-term product strength and durability. Design engineers have an unprecedented opportunity to innovate and explore product designs, but also orders of magnitude more complexity to manage. Continue reading

Ideal Upfront Simulation Tool for Design Engineers

A few days ago someone asked me if ANSYS flagship products are appropriate for the “average” engineer, and more particularly design engineers doing upfront simulation. I believe the better question to ask is which ANSYS products are geared toward design engineers, and why.

More often than not, design engineers are quite familiar with 3-D modeling tools, which are the starting point of simulations in the product development process. But given their focus on product design, manufacturability, documentation, etc., they typically do not have time or prior experience required to learn how to use a fully featured simulation tool like ANSYS Mechanical or CFD. Continue reading