Embedding ANSYS AIM into a STEM Education

In a high school classroom, we battle constantly against a storm of changing technologies, competing educational needs, time and materials. As technology advances and industries change, educators do their best to keep students competitive and prepared for these changes. It becomes increasingly difficult, though, to develop meaningful challenges for students because of the cost of materials and other resources.

At the same time, it is challenging to justify the time and importance of your content against other subjects in the school, such as math or science. With the power of ANSYS AIM and ANSYS SpaceClaim, the technology education classroom has been given an important tool to fight back against the storm. Continue reading

Stronger Bike Frame and Colder Water Bottle Designed Using Simulation

Have you ever thought, “I love this product, but it would be even better if…”? Maybe you wish it were more durable, lighter or even more aesthetically pleasing. Perhaps if it had more features, or operated under more grueling conditions, it would better fit your needs. While you may not think about these little things very often, we at Jacobs Analytics are obsessed with these details and believe in perpetual innovation. We have taken the answers to these questions and designed things like a stronger bike frame and a colder water.

The products we use everyday make our lives easier and more efficient; and when they work well enough, we tend not to think much about them. Then one day you come across a better version and realize the product you have been using did have room for improvement, and the improved design makes your daily experience that much better. Continue reading

Celebrating 20 Years of Solar Racing with ANSYS

On November 18, 2016, the Blue Sky Solar Racing team gathered at the MaRS Discovery District to celebrate our past achievements and to look forward to the future. We hosted a number of our industry sponsors, faculty supporters, and alumni who explored various displays on the team’s history including photos, trophies and artifacts from past cars. Four generations of cars were displayed at this event as well, including Cerulean (2007), Azure (2011), B-7 (2013) and Horizon (2015). It was an incredible way to celebrate the achievements of the past 20 years of Blue Sky Solar Racing with those who have been part of our journey. Continue reading

David vs. Goliath Story Using Simulation Software in the Startup World

Have you ever heard the story of David and Goliath? The old tale tells of how the young David defeated the mighty giant Goliath with daring and clever methods instead of traditional ones. At ReVibe Energy, we’ve been inspired by the story.

Now, we’re not aiming to triumph over our competitors using the same means David used against Goliath, but rather to attract potential customers through innovative and agile methods. By using engineering simulation software from ANSYS we can distinguish ourselves from our competitors and offer current and prospective customers better products in a shorter amount of time.

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Multiphysics Simulation of a Car Side Mirror with ANSYS AIM

One of the most important problems in the automotive industry is the general multiphysics simulation of coupled phenomena, where multiple — and sometimes conflicting — conditions need to be accounted for, all at the same time. One common application is the resistive heating of a car side mirror.

Designing the mechanism for keeping the mirror defrosted must also take into account the structural response of the mirror as the external environmental conditions, such as air pressure and cold temperature, cause physical stress and thermal deformation. The task is a base requirement of the automotive industry and requires a full multiphysics approach, which is still a challenge for common finite element method (FEM) simulation. In this post, we’ll show you how our engineers at SVS FEM used ANSYS AIM to model a side mirror and multiphysics analysis to solve some of its difficult design problems. Continue reading

My Experience Learning Numerical Simulation Online: Guest Blog

A few years ago, I was fortunate to work on a team that designed a road bike power meter that made it into the bike kit for a professional cycling team. That’s a rewarding accomplishment for a “roadie” like me. Finite element analysis (FEA) was an integral part of the success of that product and insights from the analyses led to a decisive mechanical change during development. It’s safe to say I’m passionate about numerical simulation.

Now I’m taking on a new challenge and am employing FEA to develop hi-tech structural composites. Here, industry is moving toward the numerical simulation realm of virtual rapid prototyping, early in the design cycle, and away from the expensive and time consuming loop to physically build, test, iterate, repeat. Physical validation of simulation is still critical but the goal is to reserve it for mature designs that are already well understood through FEA.

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MUR Motorsports Leverages ANSYS Simulation to Win

As the winners of the Formula SAE competition Australia last year, MUR Motorsports is looking to repeat our success by designing a more aggressive aerodynamics package and optimizing the weight of the vehicle. These targets were deemed by our in-house lap simulator to be two of the driving factors for winning the F-SAE Australasian competition in December. To effectively manage our workload and streamline the design process, we used ANSYS simulation software in almost all of our subteam’s design processes. Continue reading

Electromagnetic Braking Simulation by the CMU Hyperloop Team

Elon Musk’s Hyperloop concept, a futuristic train in a pneumatic tube that propels passengers across the country at near super-sonic speeds, could — if successful — revolutionize mass transportation. The Hyperloop, theoretically, can achieve fantastic speeds of up to 760 miles an hour because the train — or pod — magnetically levitates over an I-rail track inside the continuous metal tube, eliminating friction, while the vacuum in the tube itself minimizes air resistance and drag.

As a competitor in the Spacex Hyperloop pod competition, Carnegie Mellon University’s Hyperloop team is building a version of the Hyperloop pod using simulation with the theory that electromagnetic braking is the most effective way to slow the Hyperloop pod. Continue reading

AirLoom Energy On Track to Replace Wind Turbine Using Simulation

AirLoom Energy (from left to right): Mookwon Seo (engineer), Olivia Lim (engineer), Robert Lumley (president), Blossom Ko (operations). Additional staff (not pictured): Lance Goode (systems administrator), Josh Hamblin (engineer)

AirLoom Energy (from left to right): Mookwon Seo (engineer), Olivia Lim (engineer), Robert Lumley (president), Blossom Ko (operations). Additional staff (not pictured): Lance Goode (systems administrator), Josh Hamblin (engineer)

Breakthrough energy innovation comes in many forms, as we at AirLoom Energy are proving with our revolutionary design of an alternative to the wind turbine. AirLoom Energy is a startup wind energy company housed at the incubator program (WTBC) at the University of Wyoming, home of the Cowboys football team and big, BIG wind. We were recently awarded an SBIR grant from the National Science Foundation to support the prototype development of our novel AirLoom wind power generation technology, a milestone that can be credited in large part to support received through the ANSYS Startup program. Continue reading

RIT SAE Team Developing Snowmobile Using ANSYS

image001RIT Clean Snowmobile Team SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) is a student organized team that is designing, building, and racing a low emissions and high efficiency snowmobile in the SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge. The Clean Snowmobile Challenge (CSC) is an engineering design competition for college and university students that challenges future engineers to redesign an existing snowmobile for reducing emissions and noise. The intent of the competition is to develop a snowmobile that is acceptable for use in environmentally sensitive areas, such as our National Parks and other pristine regions. Continue reading